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Middle Age

HOME & GARDEN
March 31, 2005 | Chris Erskine
First sign of spring: Strawberries big as baseballs. Second sign of spring: Fall soccer sign-ups. Seriously, is there any food more perfect than a deviled egg? Car I'd most love to wake up next to: the Audi A6. Woman I'd most love to drive around? I'm thinking, I'm thinking.... Middle age is that point in life when you finally understand the infield-fly rule. L.A.'s signature sandwich: the burrito. L.A.'s signature dish: Halle Berry. Squeaky new fan belt? Try a little surf wax.
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NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Cognitive decline may start earlier than previously thought - about age 45, according to a study released this week - but that doesn't mean those hitting middle age should think their brain functions are doomed. "I think the notion that we do things as well when we're older as when we're younger is not that tenable," said Dr. Marc L. Gordon, chief of neurology at Zucker Hillside Hospital and an Alzheimer's disease researcher at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , both in New York.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | From Associated Press
Middle-age people who are overweight but have normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels are kidding themselves if they think their health is just fine, medical researchers say. Northwestern University researchers tracked 17,643 patients for three decades and found that being overweight in midlife substantially increased the risk of dying of heart disease -- even in people with healthy blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Jon Caramanica
The most shocking thing about the sweatiest recent sex scene on television wasn't that it ended, um, prematurely, nor that it resulted, indirectly, in a black eye. It's that it involved Ray Romano. Hearing Romano -- his character, Joe Tranelli, actually -- narrate this encounter, from his first post-divorce date, has been one of the many uncomfortable pleasures of "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 10 p.m. Mondays), honest about disappointment in a way uncommon for television. Unlike, say, "Cougar Town," which tackles middle age with hysteria and a series of blunt-force punch lines, "Men of a Certain Age" has far more in common with "thirtysomething": slow, even-keeled, interested in detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
The uninvitingly titled "Chlorine" is a flat, undercooked suburban comedy. Or is it a drama? Or maybe a kind of satire? Regardless, it's short on style, substance or any clear raison d'être. Set in a vaguely upscale New England berg called Copper Canyon (but filmed in New Jersey), the story attempts to lay bare the desperate times and desperate measures - relatively speaking, that is - of a circle of locals caught in the orbit of a shady construction deal. The film's nominal protagonist, beleaguered banker Roger Lent (Vincent D'Onofrio, in a strangely sleepy performance)
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman onstage is a poofball of black, all silky long legs and fur trim. Her hair is bobbed in a spray of Easter chick yellow. When she talks to the hungry crowd at the Century Club, you can still hear her breathy bedroom voice. She is, as her press release would have it, a "sex kitten on the prowl again." "I'm Joey, I'm a girl and I'm on the cover of Playboy," she coos, before promoting her pictorial with an encore of "I Get a Kick Out of You."
BUSINESS
August 1, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Retirement has long been viewed as a race you run from the day you begin working to the day you can finally stop. But the notion that the race is about getting to a "finish" line as fast as you can, and with a huge nest egg saved, doesn't fit reality for many Americans today. This report focuses on different ways of thinking about the journey to retirement--and what life can be like after you get there. * Retirement is about to become fashionable--and politically and economically important.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Billy Crystal has sold a joking book on aging to Henry Holt and Co., according to the Hollywood Reporter , for which he was paid $4 million. And just think: with that money, he can buy more than 75,000 jumbo packs of Depends . True, that's not much of a joke. But Crystal's humor, of late, hardly seems worth $4 million. The comedian, actor and one-time "Saturday Night Live" cast member was most recently in the spotlight as the host of the 2012 Academy Awards. "Billy Crystal, hosting his ninth Oscar show (his first was in 1990, his most recent was in 2004)
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The afternoon's first shark showed up like a silent marauder. Long, blue and sleek, it glided close to the boat for a look-see, made a swift pass near the bow, then swam off into open water. From the deck, we watched its sharp fin slicing through the sea. "All right," the dive master said cheerfully. "Everyone into the water." I don't know. You get to be 43 like me, wonder what life is about and start looking around for some spice.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
The aging actress sits alone onstage in a pool of light, holding a script. The audience watches from the darkness. Joan Hotchkis is reenacting a casting call for a commercial. Not exactly the pinnacle of her career aspirations, but hey, it's work. As she relives the scene, she muses about some of the actresses waiting their turn; they are competitors for the gig. Boy, she thinks, some of them are hardly recognizable these days. Skin so taut from face-lifts. Those perpetually surprised looks.
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