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BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Shan Li
Conflict roiling the Middle East will hamper efforts by Occidental Petroleum to unload as much as $8 billion of its assets in the region, according to a report. Speaking at an energy conference in New Orleans on Tuesday, Occidental Chief Executive Steve Chazen said the oil and gas giant may have to sell its Middle East stake to individual buyers rather than to a consortium made up of Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates, according to Bloomberg. Chazen told investors that that the likelihood of the three countries cooperating on the deal is "difficult at best right now," the report said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Eleven new cases of the occasionally fatal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, were reported in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, two days after the nation's health minister was replaced. In the week ending Monday, 67 cases were reported of the SARS-like virus. One patient died in Riyadh on Monday, the same day that King Abdullah replaced minister Abdullah Rabeeah. Saudi official news outlets reported no specific reason for the ouster. Since the outbreak began in 2012, 272 people have been infected in the oil-rich kingdom, with 81 of them dying.
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OPINION
April 26, 2013 | By David Schenker
Security in the Forbidden City across the street from the Great Hall of the People was tight last month when Li Keqiang was installed as premier of China. But the uniformed guards weren't armed with automatic weapons. Instead, they were equipped with fire extinguishers to prevent would-be protesters from self-immolating. China these days is consumed with concerns about domestic stability. Notwithstanding this internal preoccupation, the Middle Kingdom's increasing appetite for Persian Gulf oil has sparked unprecedented Chinese interest in the Middle East.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | By Steven L. Spiegel
There's a new industry in Washington, Jerusalem and Ramallah. It's called Kerry-bashing: The secretary of State never should have tried to bring about an Israeli-Palestinian deal; he wasted too much time; he's too soft on the Israelis or Palestinians or both; he needs to get on to other issues. Why the criticism? John F. Kerry has brought the peace process back into focus, he's dragged both sides into talks even though they were loath to make concessions, and he has altered the dialogue and perhaps even attained some concessions behind the scenes.
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | By Alexandra Sandels and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - The military coup that toppled Egypt's Islamist president has divided the Middle East between those who see the move as a broadside against pious Muslims and those who view it as a triumph for secular values. Divisions have also played out according to political and regional loyalties. The fall of President Mohamed Morsi, who was democratically elected, spelled the demise of the Muslim Brotherhood's political power in Egypt, and the Islamist movement's regional allies were furious.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Paul Richter
Mitt Romney's criticism of President Obama for taking what he called an "apology tour" of the Middle East is a signature line that the GOP nominee began using in 2010 and continues to repeat, despite wide criticism. Independent fact-checking groups, including PolitiFact and FactCheck, that have examined Obama's speeches on his visits to the region haven't found them to be especially critical of American actions, and found them generally consistent with statements of past presidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
“The Daily Show” was in reruns last week as violent protests erupted across the Muslim world, but back on the air Monday night, Jon Stewart addressed the turmoil in the Middle East - and particularly what he sees as the hypocritical conservative response to it. It's always awkward for such a topical show to respond to big news several days after it's broken, but on the bright side, the downtime gave “The Daily Show's” research team...
WORLD
February 12, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's exit Friday was too much for Amr Nassef, an Egyptian who anchors the news on Al Manar TV, which is operated by Hezbollah in Lebanon. "Allahu akbar, the pharaoh is dead," Nassef said on the air, his voice rising with emotion. "Am I dreaming? I'm afraid to be dreaming. " Across the Middle East, the euphoria was contagious. Young men waved flags through the streets of Ramallah in the West Bank, spontaneous rallies broke out at the Egyptian Embassy in Jordan, and people across the region ripped through the contact lists on their cellphones to share an empowering sense of incredulity, followed by possibility, that accompanied the news.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2013
A worldwide travel alert issued Aug. 2 by the U.S. State Department warns Americans to be alert to "the continued potential for terrorist attacks, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa, and possibly occurring in or emanating from the Arabian Peninsula. " On July 25, the State Department issued a travel warning for Saudi Arabia, telling Americans "to fully consider the risks of traveling" to that country, citing security threats because of terrorist groups, "some affiliated with Al Qaeda, who may target Western interests.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Eleven new cases of the occasionally fatal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, were reported in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, two days after the nation's health minister was replaced. In the week ending Monday, 67 cases were reported of the SARS-like virus. One patient died in Riyadh on Monday, the same day that King Abdullah replaced minister Abdullah Rabeeah. Saudi official news outlets reported no specific reason for the ouster. Since the outbreak began in 2012, 272 people have been infected in the oil-rich kingdom, with 81 of them dying.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Russian troops are massing menacingly on Ukraine's eastern border. The civil war in Syria is still raging, and 33,000 American troops fight on in Afghanistan. So where is Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel headed this week? To Hawaii - for a meeting with defense ministers from Asia, the region the Obama administration still considers its top foreign policy priority. "Asia is one of the great success stories of the world," Hagel told me in an interview in his Pentagon office last week.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Debra Kamin
What do stuffed turnips have to do with Middle East peace? Practically everything, if you ask Elisa Moed and Cristina Samara Moed, an Israeli Jew, and Samara, a Palestinian Christian, are the co-founders of Breaking Bread Journeys , which describes itself as a "cooperative Israeli-Palestinian tour program providing travelers with the opportunity to tour Israel and the Palestinian Territories. "  At its heart, Breaking Bread employs food - from those who cook it and sell it to those who love it - to provide visitors a taste of life from both sides of the borders.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Shan Li
Conflict roiling the Middle East will hamper efforts by Occidental Petroleum to unload as much as $8 billion of its assets in the region, according to a report. Speaking at an energy conference in New Orleans on Tuesday, Occidental Chief Executive Steve Chazen said the oil and gas giant may have to sell its Middle East stake to individual buyers rather than to a consortium made up of Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates, according to Bloomberg. Chazen told investors that that the likelihood of the three countries cooperating on the deal is "difficult at best right now," the report said.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Patrick Tyler
Israelis and Palestinians are facing their most difficult negotiation since Menachem Begin flew west to face Egyptian President Anwar Sadat a generation ago at Camp David. If Israel were to end its long occupation, if Palestinians were to unite and forswear violence, if two states were able to share an eternal capital in Jerusalem and bind up the wounds of their long enmity, then a viable Palestinian state could emerge to live in peace with its most prominent and powerful neighbor. Sadly, the final hurdles that diplomats, chief among them Secretary of State John F. Kerry, face in organizing a new negotiation are shaped by preconditions.
WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Paul Richter
The Obama administration is mobilizing across several fronts to shore up its relationship with Persian Gulf leaders who fear the United States is reducing its commitments in the Middle East. In unusually blunt remarks Wednesday, the State Department's No. 2 diplomat urged the Gulf nations to overcome their differences with Washington, warning that the two sides cannot afford to become competitors in nations in upheaval, such as Syria and Egypt. No other country can offer the rich but thinly populated Gulf states as much protection as the United States, said Deputy Secretary of State William J. Burns.
OPINION
February 18, 2014 | By John Bolton
President Obama has three significant Middle East diplomatic initiatives underway, treating, respectively, Iran's nuclear weapons program; Syria's deadly, exhausting conflict; and the long-standing Israeli-Palestinian dispute. Into these negotiations, Obama and his administration have poured enormous amounts of American prestige, time and effort. Although rarely considered collectively, these three efforts constitute a significant strategic package for a White House that all too often hardly bothers with foreign policy.
OPINION
March 13, 2011 | By David A. Nichols
The Middle East will undoubtedly continue to be unstable. Its legacy of colonialist exploitation, badly drawn borders, decades of power struggles, the scramble for oil and, since 1948, the Arab-Israeli conflict has ensured a rocky future. For every American president, the question is not whether but when and where the next Middle East crisis will erupt. As President Obama considers his options in the region, which president should he look to as a model for effective leadership in the Middle East?
WORLD
April 21, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy
Qatar, a glittering peninsula of skyscrapers and sand, reminds one of a well-dressed, ambitious little guy playing all the angles in a rough neighborhood. Its pushy rise to prominence is creating suspicion and hardening the Middle East split between moderate U.S. allies and more militant nations.
SPORTS
February 12, 2014 | From staff reports
A Lebanese alpine skier competing in Sochi is in hot water at home after topless photos of her taken during a photo shoot for an Austrian sports calendar surfaced on the Internet. The calendar pictures, taken a few years ago, show Jackie Chamoun , now 22, standing in snow amid ski equipment. But a leaked video of the photo shoot, filmed in a ski resort outside Beirut and aired this week on Lebanese TV along with stills, showed more revealing images of the Olympian. Lebanon is often considered one of the most open and tolerant countries in the Middle East.
OPINION
January 11, 2014
Re "Is Mideast peace possible?," Editorial, Jan. 7 The Times' discussion of the Israeli Arabs vis a vis the Mideast peace process misjudges the status of that group, which is 20% of the population. The Arab citizens have the right to vote and to be elected to office. They also have the protection of a respected legal system. They have more civil rights in Israel than they would have living in many Muslim countries. In fact, some polls have shown that most Arab citizens of Israel would not choose to leave to live in a future Palestinian state.
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