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Middle East Government

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WORLD
April 29, 2005 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The new government formed Thursday in Iraq is both an important achievement and a serious cause for concern as President Bush pushes his goal of promoting democratic reform in the Middle East. For Bush and those within his administration who have devoted enormous effort to Iraq and taken huge political risks, the moment was sweet: freely elected Iraqi legislators confirming a multiethnic Middle East government committed to drafting a constitution securing basic human rights and freedoms.
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WORLD
April 29, 2005 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The new government formed Thursday in Iraq is both an important achievement and a serious cause for concern as President Bush pushes his goal of promoting democratic reform in the Middle East. For Bush and those within his administration who have devoted enormous effort to Iraq and taken huge political risks, the moment was sweet: freely elected Iraqi legislators confirming a multiethnic Middle East government committed to drafting a constitution securing basic human rights and freedoms.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The click-click of toppling dominoes in Eastern Europe has caught the ear of Arab editorialists surveying totalitarian regimes in their own region. Spurred by unconfirmed reports that Arab mercenaries had taken up arms in Romania to defend the collapsing dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu, Arab leaders and commentators issued sharp denials early this week.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a graceful rhythm as old as China, 43-year-old peasant Yang Guilian stood in ankle-deep water and transplanted a handful of rice to a carefully prepared paddy. In fertile land south of Hangzhou Bay--the cradle of rice cultivation dating back at least 7,000 years to the Neolithic Age--Yang, loose cotton trousers rolled above her knees, handled the thin green seedlings in a manner unchanged for thousands of years.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a graceful rhythm as old as China, 43-year-old peasant Yang Guilian stood in ankle-deep water and transplanted a handful of rice to a carefully prepared paddy. In fertile land south of Hangzhou Bay--the cradle of rice cultivation dating back at least 7,000 years to the Neolithic Age--Yang, loose cotton trousers rolled above her knees, handled the thin green seedlings in a manner unchanged for thousands of years.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The arrest of a Jordanian-born Muslim extremist in the World Trade Center bombing created a sensation Friday across the Middle East with governments and other organizations scrambling to turn the case to their own advantage. In Jerusalem, officials and commentators from across the Israeli political spectrum, cited the charges against Mohammed A.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel on Tuesday launched a satellite widely believed to be capable of spying on its neighbors in the Middle East, a region springing headlong into the missile age. Government officials denied persistent reports that the satellite, called Ofek 2, carries sophisticated optics. The 352-pound probe is equipped only with communications and testing equipment, they said.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
Transportation officials have warned British airports to watch out for bombs made of plastic explosives hidden inside containers of candy from the Middle East, the government said today. Airline sources said the Department of Transport issued a memo warning every British airport to be on the alert for tins of soft candy that could actually be filled with the Czechoslovak-made plastic explosive Semtex.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California companies looking for alternatives to Asia's troubled economies should consider pursuing the nearly $2 billion worth of aerospace contracts coming up in Africa and the Middle East, according to the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. In spite of its mammoth size and potential market of 650 million people, Africa has not been a major target for U.S. companies. In 1997, their exports to Africa came to $6.4 billion, or less than 1% of foreign sales.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hundreds of Kurdish refugees headed home to Iraq from this squalid mountaintop camp Tuesday at the start of what U.S. military officers hope will be a mass refugee return to the country they fled in fear and panic just a month ago. Not all the refugees are convinced that U.S. and allied security will guarantee them long-term protection from Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, and a substantial minority still declare that they will never go down to the haven area set up for them in northern Iraq.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The arrest of a Jordanian-born Muslim extremist in the World Trade Center bombing created a sensation Friday across the Middle East with governments and other organizations scrambling to turn the case to their own advantage. In Jerusalem, officials and commentators from across the Israeli political spectrum, cited the charges against Mohammed A.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel on Tuesday launched a satellite widely believed to be capable of spying on its neighbors in the Middle East, a region springing headlong into the missile age. Government officials denied persistent reports that the satellite, called Ofek 2, carries sophisticated optics. The 352-pound probe is equipped only with communications and testing equipment, they said.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The click-click of toppling dominoes in Eastern Europe has caught the ear of Arab editorialists surveying totalitarian regimes in their own region. Spurred by unconfirmed reports that Arab mercenaries had taken up arms in Romania to defend the collapsing dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu, Arab leaders and commentators issued sharp denials early this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1999
Government warnings of potential anti-American terrorist operations coinciding with the end of the century were given chilling emphasis with last week's arrest of Ahmed Ressam, an Algerian, who was trying to enter the United States from Canada with false papers and bomb-making materials hidden in his car.
WORLD
April 28, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudi authorities said Friday they had arrested more than 170 people, including some who had taken pilot training, in connection with a vast plot to attack oil fields and prominent national figures. The Bush administration welcomed the arrests, which a government spokesman described as showing Saudi Arabia's continued efforts "to be a good partner with us in the war on terror." In a meeting with reporters in Washington, D.C.
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