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Middle East History

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OPINION
October 2, 2002 | GRAHAM E. FULLER, Graham E. Fuller is a former vice chairman of the National Intelligence Council at the CIA.
History will probably record that it was George W. Bush's neoconservative, harshly unilateral style and blunt military means that blasted open the logjam of the Middle Eastern status quo--a status quo that is hard to defend by any measure. He may wield a far blunter instrument than is desirable for engineering complex processes of political and social change, but that's the way it's going to be. Bush's policies will be the most catalytic force for change to hit the Middle East in many decades.
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OPINION
October 2, 2002 | GRAHAM E. FULLER, Graham E. Fuller is a former vice chairman of the National Intelligence Council at the CIA.
History will probably record that it was George W. Bush's neoconservative, harshly unilateral style and blunt military means that blasted open the logjam of the Middle Eastern status quo--a status quo that is hard to defend by any measure. He may wield a far blunter instrument than is desirable for engineering complex processes of political and social change, but that's the way it's going to be. Bush's policies will be the most catalytic force for change to hit the Middle East in many decades.
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NEWS
August 11, 1990
The crumbling of the Ottoman Empire left behind a power vacuum and a web of vague and ill-defined boundaries in its former lands. The political intrigues of European powers before and after World War I produced today's boundaries, which many Arabs say are arbitrary. Borders rarely mattered before oil was discovered; now they are one of the reasons that Iraq invaded Iran in 1980 and Kuwait in 1990.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wouldn't let me see it either. The monks laughed: What a foolish question. Only the high priest and one selected guardian, they explained, are permitted inside the sanctuary to view the richest treasure of this Christian shrine, the holiest object of the Ethiopian church: the Ark of the Covenant.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wouldn't let me see it either. The monks laughed: What a foolish question. Only the high priest and one selected guardian, they explained, are permitted inside the sanctuary to view the richest treasure of this Christian shrine, the holiest object of the Ethiopian church: the Ark of the Covenant.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Middle East peace process lurched toward deadlock Wednesday with Israelis and Palestinians trading ultimatums over Jewish settlements in the occupied territories and Israel and Syria even disagreeing about the facts of their shared history. Although they denied that they might walk out over the issue, Palestinian participants said that no progress can be made until Israel agrees to stop building settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deployment of U.S. forces to Saudi Arabia marks a watershed in the brief--and tumultuous--relationship between the United States and the Arab world. Just 50 years ago, when White House aides suggested that Washington seek to build some influence in the desert wastelands of the Arabian Peninsula, then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt was unimpressed. "Tell the British I hope they can take care of the king of Saudi Arabia," Roosevelt scribbled in a staff memo.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Today a new dawn is emerging from the darkness of the past. A new chapter is being opened in the history of coexistence among nations. --Anwar Sadat, 1979 Anwar Sadat, the late Egyptian leader, spoke those lofty words exactly 10 years ago today as he stood on the White House lawn with President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin after signing the first, and as yet only, treaty of peace between Israel and one of its Arab neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The four middle-aged Israeli reservists lounged in the shade of a small grove of olive trees not far from here, at the site of one of history's most famous military engagements. Their dusty Jeeps were parked nearby and their assault rifles lay on the ground beside them. "I'm a friend of Saladin," one of the soldiers quipped, referring to the 12th-Century Kurdish general and Muslim hero. "We just chased the Crusaders out of here."
NEWS
March 12, 1991
The Middle East has long been a region of shifting allegiances and borders. Here are just three versions arrangements that have come and gone during this century. Saddam Hussein tried to personally change the map once more by annexing Kuwait. He failed, but in the aftermath the world once more sees the different--and sometimes conflicting--interests of those countries with a stake in the region. As Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Middle East peace process lurched toward deadlock Wednesday with Israelis and Palestinians trading ultimatums over Jewish settlements in the occupied territories and Israel and Syria even disagreeing about the facts of their shared history. Although they denied that they might walk out over the issue, Palestinian participants said that no progress can be made until Israel agrees to stop building settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
NEWS
March 12, 1991
The Middle East has long been a region of shifting allegiances and borders. Here are just three versions arrangements that have come and gone during this century. Saddam Hussein tried to personally change the map once more by annexing Kuwait. He failed, but in the aftermath the world once more sees the different--and sometimes conflicting--interests of those countries with a stake in the region. As Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deployment of U.S. forces to Saudi Arabia marks a watershed in the brief--and tumultuous--relationship between the United States and the Arab world. Just 50 years ago, when White House aides suggested that Washington seek to build some influence in the desert wastelands of the Arabian Peninsula, then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt was unimpressed. "Tell the British I hope they can take care of the king of Saudi Arabia," Roosevelt scribbled in a staff memo.
NEWS
August 11, 1990
The crumbling of the Ottoman Empire left behind a power vacuum and a web of vague and ill-defined boundaries in its former lands. The political intrigues of European powers before and after World War I produced today's boundaries, which many Arabs say are arbitrary. Borders rarely mattered before oil was discovered; now they are one of the reasons that Iraq invaded Iran in 1980 and Kuwait in 1990.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Today a new dawn is emerging from the darkness of the past. A new chapter is being opened in the history of coexistence among nations. --Anwar Sadat, 1979 Anwar Sadat, the late Egyptian leader, spoke those lofty words exactly 10 years ago today as he stood on the White House lawn with President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin after signing the first, and as yet only, treaty of peace between Israel and one of its Arab neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The four middle-aged Israeli reservists lounged in the shade of a small grove of olive trees not far from here, at the site of one of history's most famous military engagements. Their dusty Jeeps were parked nearby and their assault rifles lay on the ground beside them. "I'm a friend of Saladin," one of the soldiers quipped, referring to the 12th-Century Kurdish general and Muslim hero. "We just chased the Crusaders out of here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1996 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Cal Lutheran University will host a panel discussion Thursday on the future of Jerusalem, featuring viewpoints from Jewish, Muslim and Christian perspectives. The discussion, from 7 to 9 p.m. at CLU's Nelson Room, is being presented by the school and the World Affairs Council of Ventura County. Admission is free. Ido Horoni, an official with the Israeli Consulate in Los Angeles, will present the Jewish and Israeli perspective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996
Nova Lee Pack, a retired Oxnard police officer who later worked as head of security for the Raytheon Corp.'s former Ventura County plant, died Tuesday. He was 71. Pack was born Oct. 19, 1924, in Paris, Ark. While a child, he lived in several cities in Arkansas and Illinois, said Pack's wife, Mary, 78. Pack, a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War, served in the Navy and Army. He had lived in Ventura County for 45 years.
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