Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMiddle Income
IN THE NEWS

Middle Income

BUSINESS
November 1, 1992
Hollywood consists of thousands of individuals who are usually unemployed but from time-to-time find short-term work on a production, "IRS Examiners About to Zoom In on Hollywood" (Oct. 20). Annual incomes of these actors, painters, editors, Teamsters, camera operators, writers, hairdressers, carpenters, costumers, electricians, makeup artists, etc. are, at best, middle income. Unlike "employees" in most industries, these workers are truly independent and entrepreneurial. They have no company-administered health plans or retirement programs.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Thursday rejected a move by a small group of lawmakers to scrap the Democratic leadership's proposed middle-income tax cut and use the money instead to reduce the federal budget deficit and help repair the nation's neglected infrastructure.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1992 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she dialed the telephone and asked for Robert, she hoped this call would be different. "Hello, this is Mrs. Pierce," she said soberly, identifying herself as a bill collector. "I'm calling in regard to the $14,000 owed on these credit cards." It was a quick conversation: "Contact my attorney. I'm filing for bankruptcy," Robert said and abruptly hung up. Mrs. Pierce, whose real name is Cora Smith, wasn't surprised.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top Bush Administration officials predicted Thursday that the economy would remain sluggish until an upswing in the spring and pressed hard again for a reduction in capital gains taxes to spur growth and create jobs. Their proposed solution was immediately challenged by several Democrats, who contended that it would further enrich the wealthy and do little for the middle-income Americans whom they want to help through tax reductions next year.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democratic leaders endorsed a new plan Thursday to reduce individual income taxes by as much as $200 annually for 90 million wage earners over the next two years and pay for it by raising taxes on the wealthiest 1% of the population. The proposal unveiled by Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, was expected to be the cornerstone of an economy-stimulating tax bill scheduled for House consideration early next year. With a presidential election year approaching, House Democrats decided to push a proposed tax reduction for 80% of all taxpayers at the expense of the wealthiest even though President Bush has warned that he will oppose legislation that raises taxes on anyone.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political momentum to approve a tax cut increased significantly Tuesday as Democratic congressional leaders said they will press for immediate passage of a bill to provide relief for middle-income families--despite the objections of a key legislator. Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said that a strong majority of House Democrats is ready to vote for a tax cut targeted mainly toward average wage-earners.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to rank-and-file pressure, the Democratic chairmen of the Senate and House tax-writing committees have agreed to propose a tax cut for middle-income taxpayers in October and to push for its adoption next year. Since the legislation is expected to meet pay-as-you-go requirements of last year's budget agreement between President Bush and Congress by sharply increasing taxes for upper-income Americans, however, it appears certain to be vetoed with scant chance of an override.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tax changes included in the new budget package should increase the progressivity of the federal tax system--but only very slightly--economists and tax analysts said Friday. While the wealthy will bear a somewhat larger share of the tax burden at the federal level if the new package passes, the tax system will still remain less progressive than it was prior to the 1980s, when the affluent received large tax cuts from the Reagan Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | ELLEN YAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ushered in by higher redemption rates, environmental awareness and voluntary curbside programs, a refuse revolution has created a recycling boom in the San Fernando Valley, as it has all over Los Angeles in recent months. The cash-for-trash movement is drawing more people and a greater diversity of recyclers, including middle-class suburbanites, joggers and retirees.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|