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WORLD
December 27, 2009 | By Edmund Sanders
In a deadly spurt of violence, six Palestinians were killed by Israeli security forces Saturday, three of them suspects in the slaying of an Israeli West Bank settler two days earlier. The bloodshed in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, after a relative lull in violence since spring, marked a setback for U.S. and international efforts to restart peace talks that collapsed a year ago. Israeli security forces killed three Palestinians in the West Bank city of Nablus during an early-morning raid Saturday.
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WORLD
November 24, 2009 | By Liz Sly and Caesar Ahmed
Hopes for a January election in Iraq faded Monday after Shiite Muslim and Kurdish legislators teamed up to vote for a new version of an election law that in effect takes seats away from Sunni Arabs and is almost certain to draw another veto from the country's Sunni vice president. Parliament then adjourned for a holiday until Dec. 8, leaving in limbo the fate of the law that is needed if the crucial election is to take place by the end of January, as mandated by Iraq's Constitution.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
Three polling stations in Baghdad were struck by explosions that killed at least 14 people Thursday, an apparent attempt to sow fear before elections Sunday that Iraqis hope will stabilize their country after years of bloodshed. The attacks were launched as security forces and hospital patients cast the first ballots in the parliamentary elections that will choose the next four-year government. The bombings came a day after similar assaults in the northeastern city of Baqubah that killed more than 30 people.
WORLD
December 16, 2009 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
As their superiors inspected a car mangled by one of three blasts that rocked Baghdad's government center Tuesday, two Iraqi soldiers nearby scoffed at the military's shortcomings in protecting the capital. For one thing, they said, checkpoints don't stop those who are -- or appear to be -- influential. The soldiers, who declined to provide their names because they were not authorized to talk to journalists, watched as authorities huddled over the burned-out car in an exclusive parking lot for government employees, just around the corner from the Defense Ministry.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
A year after peace talks collapsed, Israelis and Palestinians appear headed back to the negotiating table -- just not the same table. A U.S.-backed proposal to launch so-called proximity talks moved forward Wednesday when the Arab League gave its blessing for Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas to join the effort. Under the American plan, U.S. Middle East envoy George J. Mitchell will meet separately with Israelis and Palestinians in hopes of narrowing their differences and getting both sides back in the same room.
WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Liz Sly
Hundreds of candidates accused of having ties to the outlawed Baath Party will be allowed to participate in Iraq's upcoming election after a decision Wednesday by judges to defer hearing their appeals until after the poll. The step may help ease political tensions in the run-up to the elections, and closely matches a U.S. proposal pressed recently by Vice President Joe Biden. The 500 or so candidates affected could still be barred from taking their seats if they are elected to parliament, potentially creating a fresh political crisis.
WORLD
February 14, 2010
During a visit to the Tehran military courthouse one day last fall, Hossein and Hamid spotted the doctor. Memories from their five days at Kahrizak prison came flooding back. Prisoners seeking help were handed a few aspirin and told to go away. When they asked for bandages, the doctor struck some lightly with a club. One inmate had been beaten so badly on his feet that his toes were swollen and infected and he couldn't walk properly. He arranged for an appointment with the doctor, who told him, "Get lost before I beat you up," according to Hossein, who said he didn't even bother asking for help for his own injuries.
WORLD
April 4, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iranian scientists have submitted plans to start work on at least one new nuclear facility by September, a top official was quoted as saying Saturday, in a move that could inflame tensions with the West. Ali Akbar Salehi, who oversees Iran's complex of nuclear installations, told the semiofficial Iranian Labor News Agency that his Atomic Energy Organization has taken steps to commission "one or two" new sites pending the approval of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. He said the new installations were in line with a 2009 policy to expand the nation's nuclear technology infrastructure.
WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By Paul Richter
President Obama and other U.S. officials have explored whether the administration should offer its own Middle East peace proposal to break the logjam between Palestinians and Israelis, officials said Wednesday. At a time of growing frustration in the White House over the lack of a peace agreement, Obama and aides recently discussed whether the administration may need to turn to such an approach, officials said. Two weeks ago, Obama talked about Middle East peace efforts with a number of former senior U.S. officials in Democratic and Republican administrations meeting at the White House with Gen. James L. Jones, the national security advisor.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Mohammad Haider's family buried him quietly, without a funeral, as they had been instructed by Syrian authorities. The Syrian Kurd's body was returned March 23, two days after security forces opened fire on a Kurdish New Year's celebration in northern Syria sponsored by a political party, human-rights groups said. The killing, which surfaced Monday, underscored worsening conditions for the minority. Syrian Kurds, who live in the north near the border with Turkey, have a long and fraught relationship with the state.
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