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Midlife Crisis

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005 | Christine N. Ziemba
In the online community of www.quarterlifecrisis.com, angst can be spelled out in one simple phrase: 25 is the new 50. The under-30 set that frequents the site -- to the tune of 1 million hits a month -- can empathize with Andrew Largeman's soul-searching in "Garden State," using the message boards to document their own seemingly eternal journeys to adulthood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
A vibe in no particular search of a plot, "A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III" channels '70s mellow and '30s style through a prism of California dreamin'. In this Charlie Sheen vehicle, the fizzy mood and visuals are often, well, winning. For his second stint in the feature director's chair (after 2001's "CQ"), Roman Coppola has fashioned a noodling indulgence that's alternately freewheeling and dead in the water. The on-screen action never matters or fully engages, but for Sheen fans who are tracking his ongoing image rehabilitation, and those willing to go with the cinematic flow, the self-conscious exercise in low-budget dress-up offers some rewards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"The Boise Club" is Bernard Baldan's contribution to the literature of embattled middle-aged white men who feel stranded by feminism and an ever-changing world that robs them of their once-unquestioned dominance. Note to Robert Bly, Tim Allen, Rob Becker, etc: You don't have to step aside just yet. It's not that Baldan has nothing to contribute to the genre. He actually has a couple of funny bits, a sketch, which he has fashioned into a play. A three-hour play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"This Is 40," Judd Apatow's new comic rant, picks up the family squabble five years after "Knocked Up" left off. Settle in for a major dose of the bratty behavior that has become the writer-director's marquee move, because 40 is turning out to be a very good year. Katherine Heigl and Seth Rogen, the central punch line in "Knocked Up," are nowhere in sight and the film is better for it. In fact, not since Apatow so thoroughly crashed (and trashed) the romantic comedy scene in 2005 with the foul-mouthed charm of "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" has Apatow gotten relationships this right.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1996
Jerry Colburn's theory on "Babe" was a bit farfetched ("Lingering Over the Lessons of 'Babe,' " Counterpunch, Feb. 26). How he could speculate that "Babe" is about midlife crisis was amusing. He reminds me of the psychiatrist who thought Disneyland was filled with sexual symbols. He refers to the movie letting us feel sympathy for the animals' mortal condition as an aside--not as the primary issue. The next time you eat bacon or ham, or any animal, remember that it once was a living being who felt pain, starvation, thirst, separation and profound abuses at the hands of humans.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | Chris Erskine
Welcome to my midlife crisis, brought to you by my wife and three kids, a cat, a dog, and assorted slimy creatures that pass for pets. Welcome to my crisis, brought to you by a crazy world where nothing ever seems fair. George and John are gone. Who's next? That's right, George and John are gone--half the Beatles--but the entire Rolling Stones are alive and well, which makes you wonder just how random and fickle life can be and that maybe a midlife crisis isn't so unjustified. What sane person wouldn't have a midlife crisis in times like these?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Elliott Jaques, a psychoanalyst and management consultant whose studies led to controversial ideas about work and theories about midlife crisis, died March 8 in Gloucester, Mass. He was 86. The cause was an infection that damaged his heart, said his wife, Kathryn Cason.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Far from being a time of failing health, personal turmoil and the "midlife crisis," middle age for many is the most fulfilling time of life, according to a new study. "People in the middle decades generally have a greater sense of physical, emotional and mental well-being than was previously believed," said Orville Gilbert Brim, who directed the research project for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do men do when they hit midlife crisis? In John Bishop's "The Trip Back Down," revived by the Company of Angels, they settle into mediocrity by using alcohol as an anesthetic. If this sounds grimly depressing, it is, but director Lee Magnuson manages to grind out some laughs despite the angry tone of the over-long script.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Estonian writer-director Veiko Õunpuu's dazzling, surreal "The Temptation of St. Tony" concerns a modern-day St. Anthony (Taavi Eelmaa) who, in the wake of the death of his father, is plunged into a midlife crisis. A midlevel factory manager, Tony starts to question the value of virtue and longs to find meaning in his day-to-day reality. Tony, who lives in a stark glass-walled house with his unfaithful wife (Tiina Tauraite) and small daughter, attends loud, drunken parties; he seems lost in a crass, pleasure-seeking existence.
SCIENCE
November 19, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
At middle age, a great ape will neither cheat on a spouse nor buy a red sports car on impulse. But researchers have found that chimpanzees and orangutans experience midlife crises just as surely as do humans. That finding, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could upend firmly held beliefs about the roots of human happiness and the forces that influence its odd trajectory across the life span. If our animal relatives share our propensity for sadness, withdrawal and frustration at life's midpoint, perhaps the midlife crisis is actually driven by biological factors - not the wearing responsibilities of jobs and family and the dawning recognition of our mortality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
There's not much new or profound about "35 & Ticking," but a capable cast and a genial script make it an enjoyable look at friends of a certain age (37, despite the title). Although writer-director Russ Parr sometimes overstays his welcome — peppier editing would have helped — a generally warm approach helps distinguish his oft-told story. A quartet of childhood allies grow up to find themselves at various pre-midlife crossroads: Beautiful sportscaster Zenobia (Nicole Ari Parker)
HEALTH
May 16, 2011 | Yolanda Reid Chassiakos
"Fish out of water," Gladys said with pride as she took a seat in my office. "That's me. " No question, this full-figured, conservatively dressed woman in her 50s with salt-and-pepper hair was far different from most of her young and trendy screenwriting program classmates. Her past year had been a rough one: The unwelcome dissolution of her marriage of two decades and the departure of her adult children for higher education and work had fully emptied her nest. For the first time in more than 20 years, Gladys had no one to care for but herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Maxwell Sim, the title character and dominant voice in the ninth novel from British writer Jonathan Coe, is not someone who could be considered a good traveling companion. And yet, this is exactly the situation Coe offers in "The Terrible Privacy of Maxwell Sim," a smart if occasionally obvious satire of materialism and modern life centered on its 48-year-old narrator. Boorish, not very bright and generally weak in a way that makes him frustrating but often amusing company, Sim is a lonely divorcé hurtling toward a midlife crisis.
HOME & GARDEN
February 5, 2011 | Chris Erskine
The Little German passed her smog check the other day. Naturally, it's a major source of pride in our family ? what passing the bar exam would be to normal people. I think it was the personal essay portion of the smog test that put us over the top. The folks at the DMV said it was one of the finest personal essays they'd ever received. Dear DMV, I wanted to tell you a little bit about this car we're having smogged today. It is as German as sauerkraut and bratwurst , which is the stink it emits after five minutes at highway speeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Estonian writer-director Veiko Õunpuu's dazzling, surreal "The Temptation of St. Tony" concerns a modern-day St. Anthony (Taavi Eelmaa) who, in the wake of the death of his father, is plunged into a midlife crisis. A midlevel factory manager, Tony starts to question the value of virtue and longs to find meaning in his day-to-day reality. Tony, who lives in a stark glass-walled house with his unfaithful wife (Tiina Tauraite) and small daughter, attends loud, drunken parties; he seems lost in a crass, pleasure-seeking existence.
NEWS
July 12, 2005 | Susan Dworski
In a memoir that skillfully blends the monastic spirit of a self-imposed retreat with the isolation of the wilderness, Oregon poet and nonfiction writer John Daniel recounts his experience living nearly five midwinter months in the Rogue River Gorge. At 52, Daniel takes stock of his life with a well-supplied cabin as hermitage, and wild turkeys, bobcats and owls as confreres.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1994 | S. Irene Virbila
It's Sunday morning at the Hollywood Farmers Market, and if you want the sweetest strawberries or the tastiest tomatoes, there's no time to dawdle. Competition for the best produce is fierce. By noon, the crowd is six deep at my favorite tomato stand, and the heavy, vine-ripened fruits are just about gone. As I stop by to pick up my booty, a voice behind me calls, "Do you have the bag for Campanile?" They do. A big one.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By Ella Taylor, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Meg, the fortyish British writer worrying her life away in Scarlett Thomas' eighth novel, "Our Tragic Universe," has life crises to burn. Her shiftless whiner of a boyfriend, Christopher, hasn't earned a crust in the seven years since she ditched a more dependable lover to live with him in Devon. Her best friend, Libby, suffers loudly through a love life as eventful as Meg's is dull, while Meg weighs whether to pursue a simmering crush on Rowan, a much older, retired college professor who dithers between Meg and his live-in partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mattaponi Queen Stories Belle Boggs Graywolf Press: 228 pp., $15 paper Belle Boggs, a Virginia girl, has been cured in a mixture equal parts American West and East: an MFA in fiction from UC Irvine and an award recipient of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference in Vermont. These stories, set on the Mattaponi Indian Reservation in Virginia's Tidewater region, are rich in the details of small-town life. Boggs is precise — she has studied the movements of young and old alike, how they peer through windows, dreaming of other towns; how they peer through windshields at landmarks they've seen for half a century or more.
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