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Midori

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
This is, indeed, a golden age of violinists. At a masterly 31, the Japanese-born Midori stands as the leader -- actually the groundbreaker -- of its younger generation. On Wednesday night, Midori began the second week of her current Los Angeles Philharmonic residency in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, playing the once-neglected, now-ubiquitous Violin Concerto by Samuel Barber.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Like Father, Like Son" is a deceptively simple title for a film of considerable emotional complexity. Its children-switched-at-birth story sounds schematic, but what we see on screen is both meaningful and deeply moving. If you are familiar with the work of writer-director Hirokazu Kore-eda, none of this will come as a surprise. As one of Japan's most respected filmmakers (his earlier films include "After Life," "Nobody Knows" and "Still Walking"), there is a gentleness and delicacy of touch about his work that almost defies belief.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SANTA BARBARA - Midori is a formal and famously unflappable violinist. I don't know whether she is fearless, but she may be that too. She came to our attention at age 14 in 1986 as a soloist for Leonard Bernstein in his "Serenade. " She broke two strings during the performance, but nothing fazed her. Bernstein bowed to her afterward in awe. She's as committed a musician as you will find. She never lets an audience down. But there can be a downside to her dedication and her striving for perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SANTA BARBARA - Midori is a formal and famously unflappable violinist. I don't know whether she is fearless, but she may be that too. She came to our attention at age 14 in 1986 as a soloist for Leonard Bernstein in his "Serenade. " She broke two strings during the performance, but nothing fazed her. Bernstein bowed to her afterward in awe. She's as committed a musician as you will find. She never lets an audience down. But there can be a downside to her dedication and her striving for perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
For someone who is supposed to be a superstar, for someone who goes by a single name, Midori sure doesn't rely on personal charisma to get her point across. In fact, for three-fourths of her recital Monday night at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, she barely seemed to be relying on the violin . She most definitely is not into the tricks of its trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2002 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Midori, planted in front of two chalkboards in a packed high school classroom, sways rhythmically as she draws her bow across her burnished violin. With an upsweep, she finishes a Mozart piece and elicits loud applause. But she gets even louder and more spontaneous cheers when she says, "To be honest, I was not a very good high school student. I didn't fail anything" -- this draws groans -- "In college, I was pretty much straight A's."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | John Henken
Listening to these suave readings, it is hard to believe that these concertos were ever considered difficult for either fiddlers or public. This is almost a case of playing that is too good to be true to the character of the music. Midori is refined and technically immaculate and Abbado and his Berliners are patrician in support--the resources of this team are truly awesome and everywhere evident.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
Could there be a more appropriate Web address for the young philanthropist of the violin, Midori, than the one she has chosen, gotomidori.com? After more than 20 years onstage, she isn't just her generation's most giving, selfless musical figure, continually spawning successful outreach programs and teaching on both coasts (at the Manhattan School of Music and, more recently, at USC, where she holds the Jascha Heifetz chair).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Like Father, Like Son" is a deceptively simple title for a film of considerable emotional complexity. Its children-switched-at-birth story sounds schematic, but what we see on screen is both meaningful and deeply moving. If you are familiar with the work of writer-director Hirokazu Kore-eda, none of this will come as a surprise. As one of Japan's most respected filmmakers (his earlier films include "After Life," "Nobody Knows" and "Still Walking"), there is a gentleness and delicacy of touch about his work that almost defies belief.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2009 | Rick Schultz
Brahms is never far from the heart of conductor Carl St.Clair and the Pacific Symphony. In February, they played the composer's genial Third Symphony, and on Thursday they chose the larger, more darkly beautiful First for the latter half of their season-opening gala concert celebrating St.Clair's 20th anniversary with the orchestra. They were in wonderful form all night at the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, starting with Frank Ticheli's "Shooting Stars," a short piece -- Copland seen through a Stravinskian kaleidoscope -- long on orchestral color and rhythmic variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Focus on Eötvös," as the Los Angeles Philharmonic titled its concerts last week, wasn't exactly a festival. The focus was, in fact, tight. Only two works by the Hungarian composer were played at Walt Disney Concert Hall, although they were significant. The opera, "Angels in America," was presented at the Green Umbrella concert on Tuesday. The world premiere of a violin concerto commissioned by the orchestra for Midori was the centerpiece of the L.A. Phil's weekend subscription series.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
The music of Hungarian composer Peter Eötvös isn't "easy" in any conventional sense. A typical Eötvös piece sets the listener adrift through swaths of treacherous soundscapes and shimmering dissonance, usually without the aid of melody. Though often challenging, his music is also playful in an intellectual way - a childlike romp through a music-theory sand box. This is evident in the title of his new concerto "DoReMi," which was written for the violinist Midori and will have its world premiere Friday in a concert with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Since she made her solo debut at age 11 in 1982, violinist Midori has grown up - and grown middle-aged - under the full glare of the media. Reporters dubbed her a child prodigy when she first stunned audiences as a last-minute substitute with the New York Philharmonic. They chronicled her ascent to adolescent superstardom, a status cemented when at age 14, she went through three violins in a single Tanglewood concert. The media continued to follow her as she matured into a venerated soloist.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By David A. Keeps
Aya Sumika, who played FBI agent Liz Warner on "Numb3rs," and Trevor John, an illustrator, moved into a just-built, two-bedroom condo in West Hollywood as newlyweds in 2007. "There was nothing interesting about it architecturally," Sumika said of the home. "We wanted a blank canvas. " Her goal was to transform it into a "chic urban space with French touches. " It's home to a pit bull rescue and two cats, and in 2010 the couple purchased Midori Ribbon, the luxury gift wrap firm  Sumika 's mother founded.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2009 | Rick Schultz
Brahms is never far from the heart of conductor Carl St.Clair and the Pacific Symphony. In February, they played the composer's genial Third Symphony, and on Thursday they chose the larger, more darkly beautiful First for the latter half of their season-opening gala concert celebrating St.Clair's 20th anniversary with the orchestra. They were in wonderful form all night at the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, starting with Frank Ticheli's "Shooting Stars," a short piece -- Copland seen through a Stravinskian kaleidoscope -- long on orchestral color and rhythmic variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
Could there be a more appropriate Web address for the young philanthropist of the violin, Midori, than the one she has chosen, gotomidori.com? After more than 20 years onstage, she isn't just her generation's most giving, selfless musical figure, continually spawning successful outreach programs and teaching on both coasts (at the Manhattan School of Music and, more recently, at USC, where she holds the Jascha Heifetz chair).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1989
There was a disappointing omission in Shauna Snow's article, "Music Center Presents Chandler Awards" (Sept. 26). Although reporting details of other artists' contributions to the show, the story failed to give the titles of 17-year-old violinist Midori's contributions, saying only that there were "two short offerings by Midori." Having heard Midori last season with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, I agree with Zubin Mehta, who likened this winner of one of the Chandler Awards to "a young Jascha Heifetz" who would "play into the next century and set standards of violin playing that we don't know even exist today."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2004 | Diane Haithman
Celebrated violinist Midori Goto has joined the faculty of USC's Thornton School of Music in the Jascha Heifetz Chair in Music, the university announced Monday. As part of her teaching responsibilities, the 32-year-old Midori, who made her professional debut with the New York Philharmonic at age 11, will form two new student quartets in which she will play as an equal member. "I choose to perform with students because it lends a new perspective to learning, as well as to teaching," Midori says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2004 | Diane Haithman
Celebrated violinist Midori Goto has joined the faculty of USC's Thornton School of Music in the Jascha Heifetz Chair in Music, the university announced Monday. As part of her teaching responsibilities, the 32-year-old Midori, who made her professional debut with the New York Philharmonic at age 11, will form two new student quartets in which she will play as an equal member. "I choose to perform with students because it lends a new perspective to learning, as well as to teaching," Midori says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
This is, indeed, a golden age of violinists. At a masterly 31, the Japanese-born Midori stands as the leader -- actually the groundbreaker -- of its younger generation. On Wednesday night, Midori began the second week of her current Los Angeles Philharmonic residency in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, playing the once-neglected, now-ubiquitous Violin Concerto by Samuel Barber.
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