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Midwestern United States Federal Aid

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NEWS
August 27, 1993 | From Reuters
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G. Cisneros distributed $125 million in federal funds Thursday to states and cities to help them start repairing and rebuilding houses and providing shelter for Midwest flood victims. At a conference of federal, state and local officials on ways to meet housing needs after the flood, Cisneros said the money would help get a start "on the housing challenge."
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NEWS
September 3, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration announced plans Thursday for distributing aid to the flood-ravaged Midwest, saying that states and local governments will have to pick up between 10% and 25% of the cost. One Republican governor accused President Clinton of reneging on a promise to pay for all of the losses, and a spokesman for another called the plan "grossly unfair."
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NEWS
June 7, 1988
Democratic Govs. Richard F. Celeste of Ohio and Mario M. Cuomo of New York proposed that Midwestern states voluntarily cut power plant emissions blamed for acid rain in return for federal aid. The proposal is aimed at breaking a deadlock in Congress over cutting emissions that are believed responsible for acid rain in the Eastern United States and Canada without economically crippling the Midwest, the governors said in a joint statement.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | From Reuters
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G. Cisneros distributed $125 million in federal funds Thursday to states and cities to help them start repairing and rebuilding houses and providing shelter for Midwest flood victims. At a conference of federal, state and local officials on ways to meet housing needs after the flood, Cisneros said the money would help get a start "on the housing challenge."
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Berated by President Clinton for gridlock in the face of one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, Democratic and Republican House members finally put aside partisan differences Tuesday and approved nearly $3 billion in emergency relief for the victims of the floods ravaging the Midwest. The House voted, 400 to 27, to pass the relief bill and send it to the Senate, where lawmakers were already talking of raising the amount by at least another $1 billion.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress on Friday approved legislation that will provide $5.7 billion in emergency aid for the flood-stricken Midwest. In one of its final acts before adjourning for a monthlong summer recess, the Senate approved by voice vote a new and expanded version of the flood relief bill accepted only hours earlier by the House. The bill now goes to President Clinton for his signature.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rampaging water drove more people out of their homes Saturday in the Midwest as President Clinton held a flood summit and offered to send federal troops. State officials asked for money, so Clinton's labor secretary handed out checks for millions of dollars in aid. Clinton arrived in St.
NEWS
September 3, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration announced plans Thursday for distributing aid to the flood-ravaged Midwest, saying that states and local governments will have to pick up between 10% and 25% of the cost. One Republican governor accused President Clinton of reneging on a promise to pay for all of the losses, and a spokesman for another called the plan "grossly unfair."
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | Associated Press
The Senate approved a $5.8-billion disaster relief bill for Midwestern flood victims Wednesday night. The voice vote brought the three-week journey of the emergency aid bill nearer to an end. The measure has grown by nearly $3.3 billion since President Clinton proposed the aid July 14 during a visit to flood-stricken Iowa. Most of the increase has been at the Administration's request to meet the growing disaster.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton honored 19 lifesaving heroes of the great Midwestern flood here Thursday and signed into law $5.7 billion in emergency aid for the region. The good Samaritans included a scuba-diving jet-skier who rescued two stranded South Dakotans, and a 32-year-old North Dakota maid who dove into a basement apartment to save a man whose dwelling had become an underwater tomb.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton honored 19 lifesaving heroes of the great Midwestern flood here Thursday and signed into law $5.7 billion in emergency aid for the region. The good Samaritans included a scuba-diving jet-skier who rescued two stranded South Dakotans, and a 32-year-old North Dakota maid who dove into a basement apartment to save a man whose dwelling had become an underwater tomb.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress on Friday approved legislation that will provide $5.7 billion in emergency aid for the flood-stricken Midwest. In one of its final acts before adjourning for a monthlong summer recess, the Senate approved by voice vote a new and expanded version of the flood relief bill accepted only hours earlier by the House. The bill now goes to President Clinton for his signature.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | Associated Press
The Senate approved a $5.8-billion disaster relief bill for Midwestern flood victims Wednesday night. The voice vote brought the three-week journey of the emergency aid bill nearer to an end. The measure has grown by nearly $3.3 billion since President Clinton proposed the aid July 14 during a visit to flood-stricken Iowa. Most of the increase has been at the Administration's request to meet the growing disaster.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Berated by President Clinton for gridlock in the face of one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, Democratic and Republican House members finally put aside partisan differences Tuesday and approved nearly $3 billion in emergency relief for the victims of the floods ravaging the Midwest. The House voted, 400 to 27, to pass the relief bill and send it to the Senate, where lawmakers were already talking of raising the amount by at least another $1 billion.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial inner-city job training program sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) became the focus of a bitter dispute Friday as the House wrestled with a $3-billion Midwest flood relief bill. House leaders decided to wait until Tuesday to try to approve the disaster aid, which was blocked Thursday by 171 Republicans and 45 Democrats who argued that the assistance should be offset by spending cuts in other government programs.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rampaging water drove more people out of their homes Saturday in the Midwest as President Clinton held a flood summit and offered to send federal troops. State officials asked for money, so Clinton's labor secretary handed out checks for millions of dollars in aid. Clinton arrived in St.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial inner-city job training program sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) became the focus of a bitter dispute Friday as the House wrestled with a $3-billion Midwest flood relief bill. House leaders decided to wait until Tuesday to try to approve the disaster aid, which was blocked Thursday by 171 Republicans and 45 Democrats who argued that the assistance should be offset by spending cuts in other government programs.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS. Times staff writers Stephen Braun in Quincy, Ill., and Richard E. Meyer in Los Angeles contributed to this story
Heavy rain drummed down Wednesday on the Midwest as President Clinton inspected flood damage, called it awful and said he would ask Congress for nearly $2.5 billion in aid--an amount that he said was almost certain to grow. Rain fell hard in Kansas and Missouri. Forecasters said new storms were headed northeast, straight toward the hardest hit part of the Mississippi River basin. Worse, the National Weather Service issued a 30-day outlook loaded with still more rain.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS. Times staff writers Stephen Braun in Quincy, Ill., and Richard E. Meyer in Los Angeles contributed to this story
Heavy rain drummed down Wednesday on the Midwest as President Clinton inspected flood damage, called it awful and said he would ask Congress for nearly $2.5 billion in aid--an amount that he said was almost certain to grow. Rain fell hard in Kansas and Missouri. Forecasters said new storms were headed northeast, straight toward the hardest hit part of the Mississippi River basin. Worse, the National Weather Service issued a 30-day outlook loaded with still more rain.
NEWS
June 7, 1988
Democratic Govs. Richard F. Celeste of Ohio and Mario M. Cuomo of New York proposed that Midwestern states voluntarily cut power plant emissions blamed for acid rain in return for federal aid. The proposal is aimed at breaking a deadlock in Congress over cutting emissions that are believed responsible for acid rain in the Eastern United States and Canada without economically crippling the Midwest, the governors said in a joint statement.
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