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Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo

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NEWS
April 12, 1989
Drug czar Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, believed to be Mexico's biggest cocaine dealer, brushed off the accusations as he was charged in Mexico City with possession, trafficking and transportation of illegal drugs. "I don't know why they connect me with the cocaine business," he said after the charges were read. "I have never had that type of dealings." Felix Gallardo, 43, arrested Saturday in Guadalajara, said he does "legal business" and earns his money from two hotels.
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NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials have arrested a man they accuse of being the mentor and principal financier of imprisoned drug kingpin Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo during the drug lord's two years in prison. Baltazar Diaz Vega, 40, was arrested Tuesday at his home in Culiacan, a city in northwestern Mexico known as a drug center and Felix Gallardo's home base. Diaz Vega has played a key role in Colombian-Mexican-U.S.
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NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials have arrested a man they accuse of being the mentor and principal financier of imprisoned drug kingpin Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo during the drug lord's two years in prison. Baltazar Diaz Vega, 40, was arrested Tuesday at his home in Culiacan, a city in northwestern Mexico known as a drug center and Felix Gallardo's home base. Diaz Vega has played a key role in Colombian-Mexican-U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capture of Mexican cocaine baron Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo two years ago elated American officials, who predicted his arrest would have "a significant impact" on drug supplies in the United States. The multimillion-dollar empire of the "godfather" of Mexican traffickers would crumble, they said. But today, U.S. and Mexican officials concede that Felix Gallardo continues to direct a lucrative cocaine-trafficking business from his jail cell in southern Mexico City.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Mexico and the United States agreed Friday on closer ties in the war on drugs, including joint operations to halt cross-border trafficking, Attorney General Dick Thornburgh said. Thornburgh reached the agreement with Mexican Attorney General Enrique Alvarez del Castillo, days after Mexico captured Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, one of Latin America's top drug barons. "It is my hope that as a result of this meeting, we can begin to strengthen our ties in helping to eradicate what President Bush has called the scourge of drugs," Thornburgh said after the meeting.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Tuesday strongly praised Mexico for its actions against drug trafficking, calling the government's new crackdown on cocaine smugglers "unprecedented." "Mexico has taken some very significant steps," Baker told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. "There shouldn't be a lot of debate and doubt about certifying Mexico (as aiding in U.S. anti-drug efforts)." Baker pointed to the arrest April 8 of Mexican drug kingpin Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo as a sign of the country's new toughness toward drugs.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Enrique Alvarez del Castillo said Monday that arresting Mexico's biggest reputed drug lord and six police officials in a weekend sweep was a blow at corruption, and he vowed to continue the crackdown. Alvarez told reporters that arresting men like Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, 43, was "one of the top priorities" of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari's new administration. In addition to Felix Gallardo and three aides, the sweep also netted the top federal anti-drug official in the alleged drug kingpin's home state and five other ranking police officials, Alvarez said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
The arrest of a man said to be Mexico's narcotics kingpin is one more indication that President Carlos Salinas de Gortari is serious about eliminating corruption in the Mexican legal and political system. Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, who was arrested by Mexican federal agents this week in the Pacific Coast state of Sinaloa, is considered that nation's top trafficker in cocaine, heroin and marijuana, not just by Mexican officials but by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. U.S. officials are so overjoyed at the seizure of a man they suspect ordered the brutal murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985 that a DEA spokesman called the arrest a "landmark" in the history of cooperation between Mexican and U.S. law enforcement.
OPINION
April 16, 1989 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico
The agreement between the Mexican government and the International Monetary Fund, announced Wednesday, is another indication of the growing cleavage that Mexico's society and government is undergoing today. Made public two days after the arrest in Guadalajara of drug lord Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, the $3.6-billion, three-year IMF credit, as well as the drug bust, can be viewed in two different ways, depending on one's vantage point. On the one hand, there is the growing list of intrinsically positive and praiseworthy spectacular arrests that President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has been able to carry out since taking office: oil union leader Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, stockbroker and businessman Eduardo Legorreta, comic-book magnate Guillermo de la Parra and now Felix Gallardo.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's attorney general acknowledged Monday that Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, one of the world's top cocaine, marijuana and heroin traffickers, ran his multibillion-dollar operation for the last 15 years with the protection of corrupt Mexican police officials. Atty. Gen. Enrique Alvarez del Castillo said that six law enforcement officials, including one of his own men, were detained following the Saturday night arrest of Felix Gallardo in Guadalajara. He said the drug lord fingered the officials.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prosecution witness in the Enrique Camarena murder trial testified Friday in Los Angeles federal court that Mexican drug lord Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo told him that he believed his narcotics trafficking operation was safe because he was supplying arms to the Nicaraguan Contras. Lawrence Victor Harrison also said that Felix told him in a face-to-face conversation that he (Felix) got others to provide funds for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1990 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Retamoza insists he had no intention of joining the family business when he traveled south to Tijuana in 1980 to visit his cousin at the El Presidente hotel. But his tall, square-jawed cousin presented a tempting role model. Surrounded by his usual fawning delegation, including four bodyguards, Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo was on his way to amassing cash and property worth an estimated $1 billion as one of Mexico's most notorious drug lords.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A list of prosecution witnesses scheduled to testify against the accused murderers of U.S. undercover drug agent Enrique Camarena indicates that the government's case partially relies on paid informants, accused drug dealers and a former Mexican law enforcement officer reputed to have killed 35 to 50 interrogation subjects.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Tuesday strongly praised Mexico for its actions against drug trafficking, calling the government's new crackdown on cocaine smugglers "unprecedented." "Mexico has taken some very significant steps," Baker told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. "There shouldn't be a lot of debate and doubt about certifying Mexico (as aiding in U.S. anti-drug efforts)." Baker pointed to the arrest April 8 of Mexican drug kingpin Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo as a sign of the country's new toughness toward drugs.
OPINION
April 16, 1989 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico
The agreement between the Mexican government and the International Monetary Fund, announced Wednesday, is another indication of the growing cleavage that Mexico's society and government is undergoing today. Made public two days after the arrest in Guadalajara of drug lord Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, the $3.6-billion, three-year IMF credit, as well as the drug bust, can be viewed in two different ways, depending on one's vantage point. On the one hand, there is the growing list of intrinsically positive and praiseworthy spectacular arrests that President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has been able to carry out since taking office: oil union leader Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, stockbroker and businessman Eduardo Legorreta, comic-book magnate Guillermo de la Parra and now Felix Gallardo.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Mexico and the United States agreed Friday on closer ties in the war on drugs, including joint operations to halt cross-border trafficking, Attorney General Dick Thornburgh said. Thornburgh reached the agreement with Mexican Attorney General Enrique Alvarez del Castillo, days after Mexico captured Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, one of Latin America's top drug barons. "It is my hope that as a result of this meeting, we can begin to strengthen our ties in helping to eradicate what President Bush has called the scourge of drugs," Thornburgh said after the meeting.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prosecution witness in the Enrique Camarena murder trial testified Friday in Los Angeles federal court that Mexican drug lord Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo told him that he believed his narcotics trafficking operation was safe because he was supplying arms to the Nicaraguan Contras. Lawrence Victor Harrison also said that Felix told him in a face-to-face conversation that he (Felix) got others to provide funds for the U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capture of Mexican cocaine baron Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo two years ago elated American officials, who predicted his arrest would have "a significant impact" on drug supplies in the United States. The multimillion-dollar empire of the "godfather" of Mexican traffickers would crumble, they said. But today, U.S. and Mexican officials concede that Felix Gallardo continues to direct a lucrative cocaine-trafficking business from his jail cell in southern Mexico City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
The arrest of a man said to be Mexico's narcotics kingpin is one more indication that President Carlos Salinas de Gortari is serious about eliminating corruption in the Mexican legal and political system. Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, who was arrested by Mexican federal agents this week in the Pacific Coast state of Sinaloa, is considered that nation's top trafficker in cocaine, heroin and marijuana, not just by Mexican officials but by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. U.S. officials are so overjoyed at the seizure of a man they suspect ordered the brutal murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985 that a DEA spokesman called the arrest a "landmark" in the history of cooperation between Mexican and U.S. law enforcement.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, drug enforcement officials had stalked the man they called "the godfather" of Mexican cocaine trafficking, but Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo routinely eluded them through a network of secret ranches and urban safehouses, hidden telephone lines and police protection. Just last month, what were intended as surprise raids on three of the reputed drug lord's houses in Guadalajara came an hour too late and ended in another failure for U.S. and Mexican officials.
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