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Mike Antonovich

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1994 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some senior county government officials are running their offices woefully over budget, but the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has done little to rein them in. That's because it is the supervisors who are the budget busters. Four of the five supervisors are projected to spend significantly more on their staffs this year than was budgeted, according to a report from the board's executive officer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without hearing one campaign speech or debate, without stepping into a voting booth, without even formally asking for a change in representation, San Fernando Valley residents have acquired a new county supervisor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1994 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a compromise over who should hold one of the region's most powerful political posts, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority board on Wednesday elected Los Angeles County Supervisor Ed Edelman as its next chairman, picking fellow Supervisor Mike Antonovich to succeed him after his retirement in December. Antonovich had angled to take over the job immediately, lobbying board members to bypass the usual rotation and install him as the next chairman over Edelman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1993 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they grapple with the worst fiscal crisis in their history, members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are running offices with annual payrolls of up to $1.9 million, including salaries of two aides earning more than $100,000 a year. Operating without firm spending controls, the five supervisors vary greatly in how much they spend to staff their offices, an examination of payroll expenditures shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich called on prosecutors Thursday to review allegations that the county's former AIDS program director violated state law by soliciting contributions from county employees. Last month, a county audit initiated by Antonovich concluded that Charles L. "Chuck" Henry asked colleagues at the Office of AIDS Programs and Policy to make donations to Antonio Villaraigosa's mayoral campaign. Henry, who has since been removed as director, denies any wrongdoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The slow-growth movement faces one of its biggest political tests Tuesday in Los Angeles County's 5th Supervisorial District, which contains a treasure of undeveloped land ranging from the Santa Monica Mountains to the hills, canyons and high desert north of the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Supervisor Mike Antonovich asked Tuesday that the county Board of Supervisors end the mandatory water rationing program in county waterworks districts. The program, which required a 20% reduction, actually resulted in user cutbacks of more than 30%, according to Antonovich. Because of heavy winter rains and additional State Water Project deliveries, Antonovich said he would ask that mandatory rationing be replaced by a program calling for a voluntary reduction of 10%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to limit sheep-grazing and land-tilling in the Antelope Valley to reduce dust. An ordinance proposed by Supervisor Mike Antonovich and approved unanimously requires grazing and tilling permits from shepherds and farmers. Applications from the dust-prone west side of the valley will be the least-frequently granted, Deputy Agriculture Director Cato Fiksdal said. The measure, a so-called urgency ordinance, becomes effective immediately for four months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich is this year's recipient of the Alexis de Tocqueville Award given by the Claremont Institute to honor support of state and local government. The award will be presented at a dinner honoring Antonovich on Sept. 22 at the Sheraton Grande Hotel in Los Angeles. Tickets are $150 a person or $1,000 for a table of eight. Dinner proceeds will benefit the institute, a Southern California conservative think tank founded in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
County Supervisor Mike Antonovich will return the $1,000 in campaign money he received from the film development agency now under investigation by the district attorney's office for possible misuse of public funds. The Entertainment Industry Development Corp., a quasi-public agency that provides film permits and tries to keep movie production in L.A., gave nearly $200,000 to candidates in the last four years, including politicians such as Antonovich who sit on its board.
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