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Mike Nichols

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Nichols is running scared. "Here's the most mysterious thing to me," says Nichols, a performer and director with an almost golden touch on Broadway and in Hollywood over the past half-century. "I look back at those first plays I did and the first movies I did, and I only have one question, which is, 'What was I so confident about? Where did I get that?' It scares me because I'm not [confident] now at all. I'm anything but confident. " Contemplating the terrors of life seems both apt and incongruous in the course of an interview with Nichols.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By David Ng
With seats scarce and ticket prices through the roof, "Betrayal" is one of the most coveted shows on Broadway. The production features real-life couple Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz enacting Harold Pinter's reverse-chronological tale of adultery, directed by Mike Nichols. "Betrayal," which officially opened Sunday at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in New York, has already made news for its robust box-office performance. The production has exceeded $1.1 million in ticket sales on a weekly basis during its preview period -- a number more often associated with blockbuster musicals than revivals of plays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007 | Glenn Kenny, Special to The Times
From the very beginning of his moviemaking career, director Mike Nichols has displayed an extraordinary knack for knowing what the adult moviegoing public of America wants to see, even before said public knows it wants to see it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Wielding silence as deftly as he harnessed speech, British playwright Harold Pinter wrote plays that have the precision of musical scores. Much of the joy in encountering these extravagantly minimalist works in performance is noticing where the stresses have been placed and interpretive liberties taken. "Betrayal," first produced in London in 1978, is the Pinter play that has lately been drawing the starriest interpreters. In Ian Rickson's 2011 West End revival, Kristin Scott Thomas was like an icy cinder, coolly burning her way to the heart of this drama that lays bare the gamesmanship of marital infidelity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By David Ng
Mike Nichols picked up his sixth Tony Award on Sunday for directing the recent revival of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman. " Nichols, 80, thanked Rebecca Miller, the daughter of the playwright, as well as the cast and crew of the production. The revival starred Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield. The director said that "Death of a Salesman" is a rare play that "gets truer as time goes by. " He also noted that the Beacon Theatre, where the award ceremony was taking place, "was my neighborhood move theater when I was a kid. " TONYS 2012: Red carpet | Winners & Nominees The other nominees in the category were Nicholas Hytner for "One Man, Two Guvnors," Pam MacKinnon for "Clybourne Park" and Roger Rees and Alex Timbers for "Peter and the Starcatcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
It seems like only yesterday that Mike Nichols and Elaine May were the freshest voices in comedy--he the love-struck dentist, she the patient in a wonderful send-up of "Brief Encounter," one among their many deft little skits. But they broke up the team nearly 30 years ago. It seems like only the day after yesterday that Nichols was the hottest young director on Broadway, commencing with the Tony-winning "Barefoot in the Park," but that was in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Mike Nichols was improvising. The former improvisational comedian who (with Elaine May) brought psychoanalytic humor to America in the 1950s was at it again. Nichols was trying to explain "Heartburn," the Meryl Streep-Jack Nicholson domestic comedy that has since opened to completely mixed notices. He was on the spot, in his own living room. And Nichols was taking his time with the answer. He might have been improvising the role of the English dentist he used to do onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't enough that Mike Nichols had pledged $1.5 million of his own money in a bidding war for the film rights to the best-selling "Primary Colors," a roman a clef based on Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign. The Oscar-winning director also had to "audition"--that is, present his vision of the film to "Anonymous," the phantom author of the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1998 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a regular contributor to Calendar
Mike Nichols has a secret. Actually, the fabled film director has lots of secrets. As soon as he is alone in his Bel Air Hotel suite, Nichols drops his voice to a conspiratorial hiss, swearing a visitor to silence, a bad idea when the visitor is a reporter. Nichols should know better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2004 | Matt Wolf, Special to The Times
Jude LAW and Natalie Portman are sitting atop a London bus, which might not be the first place you would expect to see two of today's hotter young film actors. In fact, they're filming an early scene in the movie version of the British play "Closer," which happens to be the encounter where their characters begin to get, well, close. Law is playing Dan, the journalist who has come to the rescue of Alice (played by Portman), who has been hit by a car.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By David Ng
Mike Nichols picked up his sixth Tony Award on Sunday for directing the recent revival of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman. " Nichols, 80, thanked Rebecca Miller, the daughter of the playwright, as well as the cast and crew of the production. The revival starred Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield. The director said that "Death of a Salesman" is a rare play that "gets truer as time goes by. " He also noted that the Beacon Theatre, where the award ceremony was taking place, "was my neighborhood move theater when I was a kid. " TONYS 2012: Red carpet | Winners & Nominees The other nominees in the category were Nicholas Hytner for "One Man, Two Guvnors," Pam MacKinnon for "Clybourne Park" and Roger Rees and Alex Timbers for "Peter and the Starcatcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Nichols is running scared. "Here's the most mysterious thing to me," says Nichols, a performer and director with an almost golden touch on Broadway and in Hollywood over the past half-century. "I look back at those first plays I did and the first movies I did, and I only have one question, which is, 'What was I so confident about? Where did I get that?' It scares me because I'm not [confident] now at all. I'm anything but confident. " Contemplating the terrors of life seems both apt and incongruous in the course of an interview with Nichols.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If it hadn't been for a girlfriend's mother, Mike Nichols might never have become one of the few artists to earn Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy awards — much less the 38th recipient of the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award, which is being presented Thursday night at a gala ceremony at Sony Studios. The teenage Nichols and his then-girlfriend Lucy were given tickets by her mother to see a new play on Broadway: Tennessee Williams' seminal 1947 drama "A Streetcar Named Desire," starring Marlon Brando and directed by Elia Kazan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
On the eve of being honored by the American Film Institute, Mike Nichols shared memories of some of the actors he has directed. Elizabeth Taylor (Nichols directed her to the best actress Oscar in 1966's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"): She understood, since she had been doing it since she was 4 years old, what movie acting was, and she had that kind of secret deal with the lab that, overnight in the bath, what we had seen her do on the set was about three times better [on screen]
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2010 | By Matea Gold
When Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. started his latest genealogical project for PBS, which used historical archives and cutting-edge genetic research to trace the ancestry of a dozen famous Americans, he already had one hoped-for outcome in mind. "I wanted to pick someone who is Jewish and someone who is Muslim and pray we get the same result in their DNA," he said. Sure enough, genetic testing revealed that director Mike Nichols, of Eastern European Jewish heritage, and surgeon and television host Mehmet Oz, the son of Turkish Muslim immigrants, had a common paternal ancestor thousands of years ago. "That is like affirming the story of Abraham," Gates said delightedly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2009 | Susan King
Oscar-winning director Mike Nichols has been selected by the American Film Institute Board of Trustees to receive the 38th annual AFI Life Achievement Award. The 77-year-old filmmaker joins directors John Ford, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Martin Scorsese, among others, who have received the AFI's highest honor for a career in film. Nichols' first Oscar nomination came with 1966's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" The following year, he won the Oscar for "The Graduate."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Wielding silence as deftly as he harnessed speech, British playwright Harold Pinter wrote plays that have the precision of musical scores. Much of the joy in encountering these extravagantly minimalist works in performance is noticing where the stresses have been placed and interpretive liberties taken. "Betrayal," first produced in London in 1978, is the Pinter play that has lately been drawing the starriest interpreters. In Ian Rickson's 2011 West End revival, Kristin Scott Thomas was like an icy cinder, coolly burning her way to the heart of this drama that lays bare the gamesmanship of marital infidelity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Columbia Pact: Mike Nichols and his Icarus Productions have a new two-year, first-look development and production agreement with Columbia Pictures. The pact marks Nichols' return to Columbia, where he made "The Graduate," "Silkwood" and, most recently, "Postcards From the Edge." His first picture is expected to be "Wolf," described as "an epic love story and thriller."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007 | Glenn Kenny, Special to The Times
From the very beginning of his moviemaking career, director Mike Nichols has displayed an extraordinary knack for knowing what the adult moviegoing public of America wants to see, even before said public knows it wants to see it.
NEWS
November 21, 2007
1. Ethan and Joel Coen, "No Country for Old Men" 2. Joe Wright, "Atonement" 3. Sidney Lumet, "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead" 4. Mike Nichols, "Charlie Wilson's War" 5. Tim Burton, "Sweeney Todd" Best director: Critical kudos and great early box-office returns for "No Country for Old Men" are helping the Coens hold a slim lead over Wright. Meanwhile, Nichols gathers heat.
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