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Mike Port

SPORTS
December 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Angel General Manager Mike Port will head a sports consulting firm from his San Clemente home. Port will work on special projects and will assist teams in presenting salary arbitration cases.
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SPORTS
May 11, 1991
Mike Port fired? Dan O'Brien hired? Richard Brown in charge? There's something wrong at the Big A, and it sure wasn't Port. What we have unfortunately is a troubled organization destined for nowhere but the cellar with the departure of Mr. Port. Who does Richard Brown, a relative newcomer to baseball, think he is firing the man who has finally set the Angels on the right track. While the doubters doubted, Port orchestrated trades in which the dividends have been astronomical. Claudell Washington for Luis Polonia, Mike Witt for Dave Winfield are a couple of transactions consummated by Port.
SPORTS
May 7, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's slightly past noon on a game day, and Mike Port is looking forward to an Angel victory. In that respect, nothing has changed. But Port's car is in the driveway of his home in San Clemente and not in the space once reserved for him at Anaheim Stadium. He is wearing a plaid shirt and jeans instead of a business suit, and his chair is a yellow upholstered swivel rocker next to the fireplace in his living room. In front of him is a coffee table, not a desk piled with scouting reports.
SPORTS
May 7, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Despite his personal regard for Mike Port, Angel owner Gene Autry said he couldn't overrule club President Richard Brown's decision to fire Port as general manager last Tuesday. In his first public comments on Port's dismissal, Autry said he called Port after the move was made but was unwilling to interfere with Brown's decision. "That's what you've got people there for," Autry said. "I don't like to go over anybody's head.
SPORTS
May 6, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Mike Port continues to remain silent regarding his dismissal as the Angels' general manager last Tuesday. Tim Mead, the club's director of media relations, said he told Port reporters have requested interviews but Port said he "had nothing to say at this time."
SPORTS
May 2, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Mike Port, fired as general manager Tuesday, canceled a conference call with reporters Wednesday. A club spokesman said Port "had someplace he had to be." There was no immediate word on when Port would comment publicly on his dismissal. Wally Joyner, outspoken in his criticism of Port's firing, said he hadn't received any rebukes for his comments. "Not yet," he said.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing insurmountable differences in their styles, Angels President Richard Brown fired General Manager Mike Port on Tuesday. Dan O'Brien, the Angels' senior vice president for baseball operations, will assume Port's duties for the rest of the season, although he will not assume Port's title. Port, 45, had been with the Angels since 1977, progressing from director of player personnel to vice president and chief administrative officer in 1980. He added the title of general manager on Sept.
SPORTS
May 1, 1991 | MIKE PENNER
There were really two Mike Ports who occupied the office of Angel general manager, although one went largely unseen by the public--obfuscated, as Port would put it, by the verbal gobbledygook that often made him seem a Spiro Agnew cast adrift in a sea of Luis Polonias. Away from the At-this-point-in-times and the I-submit-to-yous, we submit that Port could be almost a regular guy, or at least an irregular guy with a sense of humor.
SPORTS
May 1, 1991 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Angels said goodby to General Manager Mike Port on Tuesday, firing the man whose job had been to preside over so many farewells. Like his own, they were sometimes swift and seldom fond. Port became the team's general manager in 1984. Soon, a tradition took hold, and it seemed that every year a veteran player went by the wayside, without ceremonial thanks or tribute. Justly or not, Port became the symbol of the business-first Angels, a team that didn't have time for goodbys.
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