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Mike Webster

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Webster, the rugged Pittsburgh Steeler center who snapped the ball to Terry Bradshaw to win Super Bowl championships but was beset by physical and financial difficulties in retirement, died Tuesday in Pittsburgh. He was 50. No cause of death was announced by Allegheny General Hospital at the request of the family, but Webster was being treated in the coronary care unit after being admitted Monday.
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SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The estate of Pro Football Hall of Famer Mike Webster has sued the NFL over concussions the Pittsburgh Steelers center sustained during his career. Webster's is one of six estates of deceased former players among the 66 plaintiffs in the lawsuit that was  filed in L.A. Superior Court last month and moved to U.S. District Court for the Central District of California this week. The plaintiffs include the estates of former Steelers offensive linemen Terry Long and Justin Strzelczyk.
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SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | ALAN ROBINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mike Webster, the indestructible Pittsburgh Steeler with the rolled-up shirt sleeves and the ever-present stare that warned don't tread on me, never met another man he couldn't beat. With Webster often serving as his solitary defender, Terry Bradshaw always had the best protection. With Webster pushing aside much bigger defensive tackles, Franco Harris always had the biggest holes. The Pittsburgh Steelers always had the most Super Bowl rings.
SPORTS
December 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The estate of NFL Hall of Fame center Mike Webster is entitled to collect more than $1.5 million in disability benefits because brain damage left him unable to work after his football career. The unanimous decision Wednesday by a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a Baltimore judge's order that the NFL pay Webster's estate benefits retroactive to the date of his retirement, plus interest and legal fees. The amount is about $1.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mike Webster, mainstay center on the Pittsburgh's four Super Bowl championship teams, retired after a 17-year career that probably will carry him into the NFL Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mike Webster, mainstay center on the Pittsburgh's four Super Bowl championship teams, retired after a 17-year career that probably will carry him into the NFL Hall of Fame. "It has been 17 wonderful years, but one thing you learn in this game is reality, " said Webster, who will turn 39 Monday. "It's time." Webster spent the last two seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs after changing his plans to retire in 1989.
SPORTS
November 27, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
If you were on the lam from the law or fleeing war crimes, where would you go to hide out? The Cayman Islands? Paraguay? A cabin in the Rockies? A secluded villa in the south of France? How about center on an NFL football team? You wouldn't even have to change your name. It has long been the notion here that Judge Crater disappeared into the middle of a pro football line years ago. Amelia Earhart could have crashed there. Even your friends and neighbors lose track of you.
SPORTS
February 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Steelers center Mike Webster, the last veteran of the team's four Super Bowl victories, announced his retirement from the National Football League, saying he could not imagine playing for any team but Pittsburgh. "After wearing the black and gold for so long, I just couldn't look at any other jersey and imagine myself wearing it," Webster said Tuesday night. "I'm at peace with my decision. It's the right thing to do. I wanted it to end here in Pittsburgh."
SPORTS
December 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The estate of NFL Hall of Fame center Mike Webster is entitled to collect more than $1.5 million in disability benefits because brain damage left him unable to work after his football career. The unanimous decision Wednesday by a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a Baltimore judge's order that the NFL pay Webster's estate benefits retroactive to the date of his retirement, plus interest and legal fees. The amount is about $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Webster, the rugged Pittsburgh Steeler center who snapped the ball to Terry Bradshaw to win Super Bowl championships but was beset by physical and financial difficulties in retirement, died Tuesday in Pittsburgh. He was 50. No cause of death was announced by Allegheny General Hospital at the request of the family, but Webster was being treated in the coronary care unit after being admitted Monday.
SPORTS
July 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
His famous jaw never slackened. His eyes never teared. Don Shula was the epitome of the great coach Saturday as he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Shula was in full control as he recounted his 67-year journey from Grand River, Ohio, to "the ultimate honor." He reflected on the great triumphs as the winningest coach in pro football history--and the disappointments, but at no time was Shula off-stride. And that's just what anyone who played for or against him would have expected.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | ALAN ROBINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mike Webster, the indestructible Pittsburgh Steeler with the rolled-up shirt sleeves and the ever-present stare that warned don't tread on me, never met another man he couldn't beat. With Webster often serving as his solitary defender, Terry Bradshaw always had the best protection. With Webster pushing aside much bigger defensive tackles, Franco Harris always had the biggest holes. The Pittsburgh Steelers always had the most Super Bowl rings.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Crimes in Time" / 6 and 10 p.m. History Channel Producers of this two-hour special have selected four crimes that ostensibly "tell the story of an era." Well, you can be the judge of that while watching an account of the man who in 1911 stole the Mona Lisa--not for money, but for revenge.
SPORTS
January 26, 1997 | BOB OATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During the 49 years that Los Angeles was represented in pro football by the Rams, Tom Mack was their best offensive lineman and Jack Youngblood was, except for Deacon Jones, their best defensive end. Or so many Ram fans have said for many years.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mike Webster, mainstay center on the Pittsburgh's four Super Bowl championship teams, retired after a 17-year career that probably will carry him into the NFL Hall of Fame. "It has been 17 wonderful years, but one thing you learn in this game is reality, " said Webster, who will turn 39 Monday. "It's time." Webster spent the last two seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs after changing his plans to retire in 1989.
SPORTS
July 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
His famous jaw never slackened. His eyes never teared. Don Shula was the epitome of the great coach Saturday as he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Shula was in full control as he recounted his 67-year journey from Grand River, Ohio, to "the ultimate honor." He reflected on the great triumphs as the winningest coach in pro football history--and the disappointments, but at no time was Shula off-stride. And that's just what anyone who played for or against him would have expected.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Crimes in Time" / 6 and 10 p.m. History Channel Producers of this two-hour special have selected four crimes that ostensibly "tell the story of an era." Well, you can be the judge of that while watching an account of the man who in 1911 stole the Mona Lisa--not for money, but for revenge.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mike Webster, mainstay center on the Pittsburgh's four Super Bowl championship teams, retired after a 17-year career that probably will carry him into the NFL Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
November 27, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
If you were on the lam from the law or fleeing war crimes, where would you go to hide out? The Cayman Islands? Paraguay? A cabin in the Rockies? A secluded villa in the south of France? How about center on an NFL football team? You wouldn't even have to change your name. It has long been the notion here that Judge Crater disappeared into the middle of a pro football line years ago. Amelia Earhart could have crashed there. Even your friends and neighbors lose track of you.
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