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Milan Babic

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WORLD
June 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.N. court at The Hague sentenced Milan Babic, leader of Croatia's rebellious Serbs, to 13 years in prison for inflaming an ethnic cleansing campaign that killed about 200 Croats and expelled tens of thousands. The judgment sought to strike a balance between punishing the crime and rewarding Babic's willingness to testify against former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and other former allies.
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WORLD
June 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.N. court at The Hague sentenced Milan Babic, leader of Croatia's rebellious Serbs, to 13 years in prison for inflaming an ethnic cleansing campaign that killed about 200 Croats and expelled tens of thousands. The judgment sought to strike a balance between punishing the crime and rewarding Babic's willingness to testify against former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and other former allies.
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WORLD
November 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. war crimes tribunal has indicted former Croatian Serb leader Milan Babic on five counts of war crimes in "ethnic cleansing" in the 1990s. Babic, 47, is accused of seeking to drive non-Serbs from parts of Croatia that prosecutors say he wanted to turn into a "new Serb-dominated state." He was aided by Slobodan Milosevic, who was then president of Serbia, the indictment said. Babic testified against Milosevic last year, accusing him of fueling war in Croatia.
WORLD
November 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. war crimes tribunal has indicted former Croatian Serb leader Milan Babic on five counts of war crimes in "ethnic cleansing" in the 1990s. Babic, 47, is accused of seeking to drive non-Serbs from parts of Croatia that prosecutors say he wanted to turn into a "new Serb-dominated state." He was aided by Slobodan Milosevic, who was then president of Serbia, the indictment said. Babic testified against Milosevic last year, accusing him of fueling war in Croatia.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
The last key opponent of a U.N. plan to deploy thousands of peacekeepers to war-torn Croatia was ousted from power Sunday, news reports said. The Yugoslav news agency Tanjug said legislators in the ethnic Serbian enclave of Krajina in southwestern Croatia fired Krajina President Milan Babic in a special session. The assembly also dissolved the Krajina government, Tanjug said. Babic could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1992
The United Nations' peace plan for Serbia and Croatia is in deep trouble. That plan, agreed to by leaders of both sides, called for the withdrawal of all combatants from disputed territory and the installation of a U.N. peacekeeping force. But as Carol Williams reports in today's Times, a renegade Serbian leader, Milan Babic, has now refused to allow U.N. Undersecretary General Marrack Goulding to deploy foreign forces in Babic's regional stronghold.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A United Nations plan for restoring peace in the Balkans has been halted at the armed barricades around Krajina, the Serbian-controlled stretch of disputed territory where rebels would rather wage war than remain part of Croatia. The U.N. plan to send as many as 10,000 peacekeeping troops to Croatian trouble spots has won at least professions of support from all parties to the Yugoslav conflict, except for one bespectacled dentist who controls the angry enclave of Krajina.
WORLD
November 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Former rebel Croatian Serb leader Milan Babic entered no plea to counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity at his first appearance before the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague. Babic, 47, was charged this month with war crimes and crimes against humanity for killing and persecuting non-Serbs in an "ethnic cleansing" campaign in the early 1990s.
WORLD
March 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Croatian Serb convicted of ethnic cleansing after leading a brutal revolt during the Balkan wars committed suicide in prison, the U.N. tribunal said. Milan Babic's suicide came three weeks after he reaffirmed his remorse for his crimes, telling a tribunal that his guilt was a "pain that I have to live with for the rest of my life."
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The defense chief of the volatile Serbian-held Krajina region of Croatia broke with his political superior and said he supports a U.N. effort to deploy thousands of peacekeeping troops to the crumbling Yugoslav federation. Milan Martic, interior minister of self-proclaimed independent Krajina, said he wants the peacekeepers to come as soon as possible. Tensions are high in the region, imperiling the 16-day-old cease-fire.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
The last key opponent of a U.N. plan to deploy thousands of peacekeepers to war-torn Croatia was ousted from power Sunday, news reports said. The Yugoslav news agency Tanjug said legislators in the ethnic Serbian enclave of Krajina in southwestern Croatia fired Krajina President Milan Babic in a special session. The assembly also dissolved the Krajina government, Tanjug said. Babic could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1992
The United Nations' peace plan for Serbia and Croatia is in deep trouble. That plan, agreed to by leaders of both sides, called for the withdrawal of all combatants from disputed territory and the installation of a U.N. peacekeeping force. But as Carol Williams reports in today's Times, a renegade Serbian leader, Milan Babic, has now refused to allow U.N. Undersecretary General Marrack Goulding to deploy foreign forces in Babic's regional stronghold.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A United Nations plan for restoring peace in the Balkans has been halted at the armed barricades around Krajina, the Serbian-controlled stretch of disputed territory where rebels would rather wage war than remain part of Croatia. The U.N. plan to send as many as 10,000 peacekeeping troops to Croatian trouble spots has won at least professions of support from all parties to the Yugoslav conflict, except for one bespectacled dentist who controls the angry enclave of Krajina.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | From Reuters
Three people Saturday were reported killed in fighting in Croatia, renewing fears that the truce there could collapse. At least 10 people have died this week in the worst outbreak of fighting between Croatian forces and Serbian irregulars backed by the Yugoslav army since the United Nations negotiated a cease-fire in Yugoslavia on Jan. 3.
WORLD
December 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Judges at Slobodan Milosevic's war crimes trial revealed Friday that a secret witness testifying against the former Yugoslav president is Milan Babic, once one of his key allies. Babic allowed his name to be released after three weeks on the witness stand. His lawyer said he had decided to contribute to reconciliation in the Balkans. Before Friday, the court had referred to Babic as Witness C-61 and forbidden publication of his name, though his identity was widely known in the Balkans.
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