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Mileva Maric

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NEWS
March 9, 1990 | SIMSON L. GARFINKEL, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
Albert Einstein sometimes helped his first wife do the household chores: "He felt sorry that after her housework was done, she had to do his mathematical problems till way past midnight," says Senta Troemel-Ploetz, a linguist and historian. But was Mileva Maric merely Einstein's housekeeper and algebraic assistant, or was she a physicist in her own right, who would have been recognized as a co-author in her husband's work were it not for the pervasive sexual discrimination of the time?
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NEWS
March 9, 1990 | SIMSON L. GARFINKEL, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
Albert Einstein sometimes helped his first wife do the household chores: "He felt sorry that after her housework was done, she had to do his mathematical problems till way past midnight," says Senta Troemel-Ploetz, a linguist and historian. But was Mileva Maric merely Einstein's housekeeper and algebraic assistant, or was she a physicist in her own right, who would have been recognized as a co-author in her husband's work were it not for the pervasive sexual discrimination of the time?
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NEWS
May 4, 1987 | DAVE JOHNSON
Relatively speaking, correspondence between Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric, who became his first wife, makes interesting reading. Their letters, revealing a troubled romance and the excitement of mathematical discovery, were discovered when material was being gathered for "The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein," the New York Times reported. At 20, Einstein wrote a letter in which he anticipated his first theory of relativity, published six years later.
NEWS
May 4, 1987 | DAVE JOHNSON
Relatively speaking, correspondence between Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric, who became his first wife, makes interesting reading. Their letters, revealing a troubled romance and the excitement of mathematical discovery, were discovered when material was being gathered for "The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein," the New York Times reported. At 20, Einstein wrote a letter in which he anticipated his first theory of relativity, published six years later.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
Heirs of Albert Einstein announced Thursday that they have settled a dispute over rights to a trust overseeing letters written by the legendary physicist. Lawyers said at a court hearing that the settlement had been reached in a suit filed last year by Einstein's granddaughter, Evelyn, against the trustees of an archive that originally consisted of some 450 of Einstein's letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
They used to say that behind every great man was a great woman. In Albert Einstein's case, the two may have been working side by side. That's the premise of the intriguing, if inconclusive, documentary "Einstein's Wife" (9 p.m., KCET).
BOOKS
May 10, 1987
August, 1899 Du Maedel klein und fein was schreib ich Dir hinein? Wueste Dir gar mancherlei Ein Kuss ist auch dabei Aufs Muendchen klein. Wenn Du drum boese bist Musst nit gleich greinen Die beste Strafe ist-- Gibst mir auch einen. Dies Gruesschen zum Andenken an Ihr spitsbuebisches Freunderl Albert Einstein Dainty Missy mine, May I scribble you a line? A zillion come to mind, but this Is offered with a kiss On your chinny chin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1987
Albert Einstein was the greatest physicist of the 20th Century and, with Isaac Newton, one of the greatest physicists of all time. Now, more than 30 years after his death in 1955, Einstein's papers are being published, and they are turning out to be as remarkable as the man himself. The publication of the papers was delayed for many years by the opposition of Einstein's executor, Otto Nathan, whom Einstein had befriended in Princeton, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
To mark the centenary of the "miracle year" in which, in the course of three short papers and an addendum, young Albert Einstein changed the shape of the universe, "Nova," the PBS science series, tonight presents "Einstein's Big Idea," a fantastically grand docudramatic adaptation of David Bodanis' book "E=mc2: A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation."
BOOKS
October 22, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
A WOMAN UNKNOWN Voices From a Spanish Life By Lucia Graves; Counterpoint: 288 pp., $25 The poet Robert Graves has been in danger, in the 15 years since his death, of being more read about than read. His famous life was fed by many deep springs: women, myth and the island of Majorca, where he lived with his family for 50 years. Shining out like a beacon from these books about Graves from photographs and text is the large-eyed figure of his daughter Lucia, born in 1943.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This has to be a mistake. There, on the Borders shelf, packed with weighty physics volumes, lies a slick little book titled "Driving Mr. Albert." Its cover shows the rear end of a Buick with the license plate "E=MC2." Its plot is bizarre: Young man drives cross-country with old doctor who stole Einstein's brain 45 years ago and never gave it back. They roll westward with the sliced-and-diced brain in a Tupperware bowl in a gray duffel bag in the Buick's trunk.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2007 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
THE year was 1915. War and privation had come to Germany. Meanwhile, in Berlin, a solitary man struggled with the equations for a new theory of gravity. "I have been laboring inhumanly," Albert Einstein, then 36, wrote to a friend in his native German. "I am quite overworked."
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