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WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
President Obama threatened today to use military action against the regime of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi if he did not stop his advance on the rebels and permit humanitarian assistance to reach Libya. He said the United Nations Security Council resolution, which on Thursday authorized "all necessary measures" to protect civilians, permitted the use of force. "The resolution will be enforced through military action" if necessary, Obama said from the White House. But he also said that the United States would not deploy ground troops in the north African country.
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WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The House overwhelmingly agreed Tuesday to condemn Russian military action in Ukraine, a vote that provided more symbolism than substance as Congress continues to wrestle over its response to the crisis in Crimea. The resolution won bipartisan backing on the eve of Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk's visit to the capital, where he is expected to meet with House and Senate leaders Wednesday, and hold talks with President Obama at the White House. Yet Congress has struggled to provide a more substantive package of $1 billion in loan guarantees for the new Ukrainian government, or slap additional sanctions on Russia beyond those imposed last week by the White House.
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NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama has launched a media blitz culminating in a speech to the nation urging military action against Syria. He will speak to diverse constituencies that have little in common: a war-weary U.S. public, a fractious Congress, nations worried about the impact of a strike. Here is a primer on how to listen to the president's speech Tuesday. What started the current crisis? Syria has been locked in a civil war for more than two years, during which more than 100,000 people have died and more than 2 million people have fled to other countries as refugees.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
  WASHINGTON -- President Obama told Russian President Vladimir Putin on Saturday that the U.S. may boycott an upcoming economic summit in Russia and threatened further penalties if Moscow does not recall its military forces from Ukrainian territory. In a 90-minute telephone call, Obama warned Putin that Russia faces "greater political and economic isolation," according to a White House description of the call. The president suggested the United Nations would take action for what he called a "breach of international law. " Obama made the threats as the two leaders publicly clashed over the deepening crisis in the former Soviet state.
WORLD
March 7, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
President Obama on Tuesday ruled out a unilateral U.S. military campaign to support the beleaguered rebels in Syria, calling such an operation "much more complicated" than the NATO-led air war launched to help protect civilians during the civil war in Libya last year. At a White House news conference, Obama described the shelling and other attacks on civilians and rebel fighters by forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad as "heartbreaking and outrageous. " But Obama made it clear that he is not prepared to send U.S. forces to try to stop the carnage in Syrian cities and towns, or to help overthrow Assad, as some Republicans in Congress have urged.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Seeking to calm a nervous public, Taiwan on Sunday dismissed reports that China is preparing military action over comments by the island's president. The Taiwanese Defense Ministry said no unusual activity by Chinese forces has been seen since President Lee Teng-hui said earlier this month that relations between the two should be conducted on a "state-to-state" basis.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of Americans favor military action against Iraq if international economic sanctions are not effective, and the level of support rises among those who are following the Persian Gulf crisis closely, according to survey results released Thursday.
WORLD
March 11, 2003 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi said Monday that Japan, which had expressed support for a U.S.-proposed March 17 deadline for Iraq to disarm or face war, will not help foot the bill for any military action. "We will not bear the burden of paying for war," Koizumi told reporters. However, he said Japan would cooperate in any reconstruction of Iraq, as it is doing in Afghanistan. During the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Japan contributed $11 billion to the war effort but did not send troops.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton stiffened his support for military action against the fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Wednesday, suggesting air strikes on Serbian strongholds to end "mass, deliberate, systematic extermination" of civilians. The Democratic presidential nominee equated the situation to Nazi Germany's slaughter of the Jews during World War II and went beyond his previous statements on the use of military power in the region. He said he will seek to coordinate U.N. and U.S.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the nation braces for a possible ground assault in the Persian Gulf, Orange County residents show overwhelming--and growing--support for both the military effort there and for President Bush's handling of it, a new poll shows. With little distinction between rich and poor, men and women, 87% of county residents taking part in this week's Times Orange County Poll said they approve of the military action now under way against Iraq.
WORLD
February 11, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Acknowledging “enormous frustration,” President Obama said Thursday that the administration “continues to explore every possible avenue” to solve the nearly 3-year-old Syrian civil war. In an appearance with French President Francois Hollande at the White House, Obama said the threat to civilians in Syria and to the broader Middle East continues to worsen. “Right now, we don't think there's a military solution per se to the problem.... The situation is fluid, and we are continuing to explore every possible avenue to solve this problem,” he said.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU -- President Obama told congressional leaders Sunday that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.” After an aborted rescue mission of U.S. citizens Saturday, 380 U.S. officials and private citizens -- as well as 300 citizens of...
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Political science professor Sergei Medvedev, a longtime lover and explorer of the Arctic, drew the ire of Russian President Vladimir Putin when he recently called for international protection of the icy northern region in the face of economic development plans. Last month, Putin called Medvedev, who teaches at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, "a moron. " The incident prompted a nationwide discussion of the Arctic and coincided with the arrest of 30 Greenpeace activists protesting a Russian oil drilling project in the region.
OPINION
September 15, 2013 | Doyle McManus
President Obama and his aides were surprised this month by the strength of public opposition to their call for military action against Syria. They shouldn't have been. Americans have almost always been reluctant to go to war. In 1939, polls showed that most Americans not only wanted to stay out of war against Nazi Germany, they weren't even sure they wanted to send military aid to Britain - fearing, perhaps, a slippery slope. Today, Americans have additional reasons to be skeptical.
OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
In all the long history of American presidential addresses, has there been an odder one than this? With the solemn grandeur appropriate to a declaration of war, President Obama informed the American people Tuesday night that a congressional vote on military action had been postponed because Russia was brokering a diplomatic initiative that might - or might not - put Syria's chemical weapons under international control. A Gettysburg Address this wasn't. There will be many more turns on the road to Damascus, but the politics of these weeks since the criminal use of chemical weapons in Syria on Aug. 21 already tell us a lot about the United States.
OPINION
September 11, 2013
Re "The road to Damascus," Editorial, Sept. 10 The Times dispassionately explains the challenges faced by the Obama administration in selling the case for action against Bashar Assad's regime in Syria. Members of the administration have been spending an immense amount of energy and media time making the case that the U.S. is compelled to act against Syria. The American people just aren't buying this, so your tone seems wishy-washy on a matter that deserves a voice. Allow me to do you the favor: The United States is not compelled and should not act in the Syrian civil war. Getting involved in the Syrian conflict is a slippery slope.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Suppose that, sometime in 1990, U.S. intelligence agencies identify the North African training camp of a band of terrorists that had attacked an American embassy. The Pentagon reports that it can bomb the camp but warns that the raid could result in American casualties and probably would provoke a diplomatic uproar. Would President Bush give the go-ahead? Would President Dukakis?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991
The United States has such a long and unhappy history of military intervention in the Caribbean that President Bush was wise to play it cool when asked whether this country might join an international military effort to restore Haiti's first democratically elected government, ousted Monday in an unwarranted military coup. But diplomatic nuance aside, the President's response didn't mean that some measure of international force to help resolve the Haitian crisis is out of the question.
OPINION
September 10, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
When I first moved to Washington, I drove a beat-up Honda. But, because those were the waning days of the crack era, it was common to have any car broken into, particularly where I lived. This helped me rationalize my habit of keeping my car filthy. I figured a dirty-looking car would make a less tempting target. One day I parked around Dupont Circle. An enterprising homeless guy asked if he could clean my car for, I think, five bucks. I said something to the effect of "Sorry, buddy, but I keep it dirty so it won't get broken into.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama has launched a media blitz culminating in a speech to the nation urging military action against Syria. He will speak to diverse constituencies that have little in common: a war-weary U.S. public, a fractious Congress, nations worried about the impact of a strike. Here is a primer on how to listen to the president's speech Tuesday. What started the current crisis? Syria has been locked in a civil war for more than two years, during which more than 100,000 people have died and more than 2 million people have fled to other countries as refugees.
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