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NEWS
October 25, 1999 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the annals of titanic competitions between corporations, few during this century have been waged with the intensity or longevity as the one between Boeing Co. and Douglas Aircraft Co. for leadership of the commercial aircraft industry. It pitted William Boeing against Donald Douglas, both of whom caught the fever for aviation early in the century and who would become the two driving forces in the production of ever more advanced aircraft. Starting in 1920s, Boeing Co.
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WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU -- President Obama told congressional leaders Sunday that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.” After an aborted rescue mission of U.S. citizens Saturday, 380 U.S. officials and private citizens -- as well as 300 citizens of...
BUSINESS
August 29, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
In one of the first major contracts to send military airframe work overseas, Lockheed Corp. on Monday selected Daewoo Heavy Industries of South Korea to assemble the outer wing sections of the Navy's P-7A anti-submarine patrol aircraft. The pact, potentially worth $108 million, stunned union officials at Lockheed's Southern California plants, which have experienced major layoffs in recent years and are in fierce competition for dwindling defense work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
At a time when the Pentagon is proposing closing bases to save taxpayers' money, and military families fresh from the sacrifices of the Gulf War are wondering about their futures, the high command at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro is dealing with an embarrassing story that won't go away. Some high-flying senior officers have been riding military aircraft all over the country for personal reasons, and now the trail leads straight to the top, to Brig. Gen. Wayne T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
At a time when the Pentagon is proposing to close bases to save taxpayers' money and military families fresh from the sacrifices of the Gulf War are wondering about their futures, the high command at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station is dealing with an embarrassing story that will not go away. Some high-flying senior officers have been riding military aircraft all over the country for personal reasons, and now the trail leads straight to the top, to Brig. Gen. Wayne T.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., citing completion of several military aircraft production programs and the need to cut costs, said today that it will lay off 2,750 of its 22,900 employees by the end of June. The layoffs will include about 2,000 employees in Southern California. Ken Cannestra, president of Lockheed Aeronautical Systems, said the company is in the process of notifying the affected employees.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Chinese and Japanese fighter planes tailed each other over a disputed cluster of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, raising alarm that a miscalculation could set off an armed confrontation. Chinese military authorities ordered two J-10 fighter planes to perform what China called “verification and monitoring” on Friday after a Chinese transport plane was tailed by Japanese F-15 fighter jets. The incident above the islands, known as Senkaku to the Japanese and Diaoyu to the Chinese, was the most potentially dangerous in months of escalating tensions over the islands.
NEWS
June 11, 1985
A former Hughes Aircraft Co. employee pleaded guilty Monday to taking kickbacks for awarding subcontracts on military projects and agreed to aid authorities in the ongoing investigation of bribery in Southern California's defense industry. William Benites Huerta, 54, who worked as a subcontract administrator at the Hughes facility in El Segundo, entered guilty pleas to three of the 20 counts filed against him in an indictment by a Los Angeles federal grand jury. Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1990
I will provide the short plank if Mayor Larry Agran of Irvine provides the long walk, along with everybody else who complains about the noise at the Tustin and El Toro air stations (April 7). Agran can try blaming the county, which has cheated on Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) 65 areas. But he has only himself to blame for moving into an area with two military bases that have been there since World War II. Everyone wants to be free, but few are willing to pay for it. The noise was here before most of us were here, before most of us were born!
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