Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMilitary Commission
IN THE NEWS

Military Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
April 5, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
His words leave little doubt about his role. It is his punishment that remains uncertain. Four years ago, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed not only brazenly portrayed himself as mastermind of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The senior Al Qaeda operative also bragged to a U.S. military tribunal that he had directed other major terrorist attacks around the globe. Mohammed claimed responsibility for the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993, for the "shoe bomber" attempt to blow up a U.S. airliner in 2001, for the deadly bombing of a nightclub in Indonesia, for planned assassination attempts against Pope John Paul II and President Clinton, and for aborted attacks in London, Los Angeles, Chicago and elsewhere.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 13, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The judge in the military commission case against Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other suspected Sept. 11 plotters ruled that details of harsh interrogation techniques used on them would be kept secret during their trial, a decision that human rights advocates called an attempt to hide the fact that the men were tortured. The order, signed by Army Col. James L. Pohl on Dec. 6 and made public Wednesday, represents a clear victory for U.S. military and Justice Department prosecutors in the opening round of pretrial disputes.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The Obama administration will announce plans today to revive the Bush-era military commission system for prosecuting terrorism suspects, current and former officials said, reversing a campaign pledge to rely instead on federal courts and the traditional military justice system. Word of the decision infuriated human rights groups, which argued that any trials under the system created by President George W. Bush would be widely viewed as tainted.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Top officials in the George W. Bush and Obama administrations, including the two presidents themselves, repeatedly and publicly pronounced a group of senior Al Qaeda leaders guilty in the Sept. 11 conspiracy and created an “unlawful command influence” that pressured the U.S. military to bring capital murder charges against them in a military commission trial, defense lawyers said Friday. The lawyers, speaking at a pretrial hearing at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, asserted that the Washington officials unfairly prejudged their clients.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Lawyers representing Osama bin Laden's former driver asked a federal judge Thursday to halt his fast-approaching military trial so they can continue challenging the legality of the military commission system. Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a Yemeni held at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has been fighting his detention in federal court since 2004. Declared an enemy combatant by a military tribunal, Hamdan is scheduled to go to trial before a military commission on July 21.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the case of a Guantanamo detainee challenging the legality of the military commission system that plans to try him on charges of war crimes. Detainee Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who once was the driver for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, is accused of conspiracy and supporting terrorism. Hamdan had sought to combine his case with a separate challenge the Supreme Court is considering regarding detainees at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
The Obama administration is considering "multiple options" for trying the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, as local officials and some members of Congress resist the current Department of Justice plan for a civilian trial in New York. But administration officials are not saying whether Khalid Shaikh Mohammed could be tried before a military commission, or at the Illinois prison where they plan to move other detainees from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, or at some other unnamed site. Administration officials said last month that the White House was involved in discussions about the trial, as Congress was actively considering precluding options for trying Mohammed and the other detainees in New York.
OPINION
August 12, 2008
With credit for time served at Guantanamo Bay, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, the onetime driver for Osama bin Laden who was convicted last week of material support for terrorism, could be a free man in January. But not if the Bush administration asserts the right to continue holding him for the duration of the so-called war on terror. Having touted the fairness of the military commission system at Guantanamo, the administration should honor its rulings. That means releasing Hamdan.
OPINION
November 19, 2010
Those who never thought terrorists should be put on trial in civilian courts are now claiming vindication in the partial acquittal of a Tanzanian man accused in the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998. It's nothing of the sort. The exoneration of Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani on 276 counts of murder and attempted murder, and his conviction on a single conspiracy count that could lead to life imprisonment, instead demonstrate the deliberateness and fairness of civilian justice. The danger is that President Obama will overlook that fact amid the din from critics such as Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Moving closer to holding military tribunals for captives from the war on terrorism, the Pentagon on Friday said it is considering a wide range of two dozen criminal charges that could be filed -- including murder, rape and poisoning. U.S. military authorities disclosed the list because they are seeking input from the public this month before finalizing the types of charges and deciding which, if any, captives should be taken before a military commission.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
The Australian government on Tuesday dropped its case against David Hicks in which it sought to block the former Guantanamo detainee from profiting from "Guantanamo: My Journey," a book he wrote about his experiences. Hicks, described as a former kangaroo skinner and Outback cowboy who left Australia for Afghanistan, was captured by U.S. forces in Afghanistan in 2001 and sent to the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba, the Associated Press reports . While in Guantanamo, Hicks pleaded guilty to providing material support to Al Qaeda.
OPINION
May 17, 2012
When Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced in 2009 that Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other accused Sept. 11 conspirators would be tried in a civilian federal court, we said that his decision "makes an eloquent statement about the Obama administration's determination to avenge the victims of terrorism within the rule of law. " But the five never made it to civilian court; instead, thanks to domestic politics, they are being tried for murder and...
OPINION
April 19, 2012 | By Reed Brody
Abd al Rahim al Nashiri, wearing white prison clothes, seemed by turns amused and bewildered as he sat in a bright room last week during a pretrial hearing at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Nashiri is charged with being a key organizer of Al Qaeda's attack on the U.S. destroyer Cole on Oct. 12, 2000, off the coast of Yemen, which killed 17 U.S. servicemen, as well as of two other attacks. He faces the death penalty if convicted in a trial before a military commission that is scheduled to begin in November.
OPINION
April 10, 2011 | By David K. Shipler
The system of military commissions that will try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other alleged 9/11 plotters contains a dirty little secret. Hardly anybody talks about it, but it's a key reason for concern as the apparatus becomes established. It is this: The commissions can operate inside the United States, and they have jurisdiction over a broad range of crimes. Nothing in the Military Commissions Act limits the military trials to Guantanamo detainees, or to people captured and held abroad, or even to terrorism suspects.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
His words leave little doubt about his role. It is his punishment that remains uncertain. Four years ago, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed not only brazenly portrayed himself as mastermind of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The senior Al Qaeda operative also bragged to a U.S. military tribunal that he had directed other major terrorist attacks around the globe. Mohammed claimed responsibility for the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993, for the "shoe bomber" attempt to blow up a U.S. airliner in 2001, for the deadly bombing of a nightclub in Indonesia, for planned assassination attempts against Pope John Paul II and President Clinton, and for aborted attacks in London, Los Angeles, Chicago and elsewhere.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Sometimes putting the best face forward requires doing an about-face, as the long trail to trial for Khalid Shaikh Mohammed demonstrates. Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and four accused co-conspirators will be tried by a military commission in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, instead of in a civilian court in New York, Atty. Gen. Eric Holder Jr. announced Monday. The move marks a shift in the Obama administration's policy in the face of sharp opposition from a host of officials, some of who had earlier supported a civilian trial in New York.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
The Australian government on Tuesday dropped its case against David Hicks in which it sought to block the former Guantanamo detainee from profiting from "Guantanamo: My Journey," a book he wrote about his experiences. Hicks, described as a former kangaroo skinner and Outback cowboy who left Australia for Afghanistan, was captured by U.S. forces in Afghanistan in 2001 and sent to the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba, the Associated Press reports . While in Guantanamo, Hicks pleaded guilty to providing material support to Al Qaeda.
OPINION
September 23, 2001 | NEAL A. RICHARDSON and SPENCER J. CRONA, Neal A. Richardson is a deputy district attorney in Denver. Spencer J. Crona is a lawyer in Denver
The prime objective in war should be the defeat of the enemy on the field of battle. But what if terrorist operatives are captured instead of killed? What if the good offices of our newfound friends the Pakistanis result in the delivery to our custody of Osama bin Laden himself?
NATIONAL
March 9, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano and David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The first captive at the U.S. naval base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to be charged in a military tribunal during the Obama presidency is expected to be one of the prison's most notorious inmates — Abd al Rahim al Nashiri, the alleged mastermind of the 2000 bombing of the U.S. destroyer Cole that killed 17 sailors. And his case, beset with Nashiri's allegations of torture and mistreatment, is fraught with complications for the administration, which this week reversed course and announced it would maintain the George W. Bush legacy of holding military tribunals inside the Caribbean fortress.
OPINION
January 8, 2011
The words "arbitrary" and "capricious" are too kind to describe the Congressional Research Service's decision to fire Morris D. Davis, a retired Air Force colonel and former chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Davis' offense was to speak and write on his own time about a subject on which he is an expert: flaws in the military commission system and the appropriate way to bring accused terrorists to justice. His dismissal reflects a decision by his employers to take a legitimate principle ?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|