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Military Deployment

WORLD
February 18, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes and Greg Miller
President Obama ordered his first major deployment of U.S. combat troops Tuesday, authorizing 17,000 additional soldiers and Marines for Afghanistan in what he described as an urgent bid to stabilize a deteriorating and neglected country.
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WORLD
January 21, 2009 | Associated Press
The government here has sent NATO headquarters a draft agreement that would give Afghanistan more control over future NATO deployments in the country -- including the positioning of some U.S. troops, officials said. The draft technical agreement would establish rules of conduct for NATO-led troops and require that additional NATO troops and their locations be approved by the Afghan government. The agreement also would prohibit NATO troops from searching Afghan homes.
WORLD
December 18, 2008 | Barbara Demick
China signaled Wednesday that it may send warships to help fight pirates off the coast of Somalia, a sign of Beijing's increasing willingness to flex its military muscle. Although China has participated in United Nations peacekeeping operations in Africa, its navy has seldom left the Pacific region. The Global Times, a newspaper tied to the ruling Communist Party, called the possible deployment China's "biggest naval expedition since the 15th century."
WORLD
November 22, 2008 | Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday that he would like to send more American forces to the war in Afghanistan before national elections scheduled for next year, and that grim depictions of the 7-year-old war are "far too pessimistic." Gates said additional forces would provide greater security and predicted that conditions would "be under enough control to allow the elections to take place" in the fall.
WORLD
October 30, 2008 | Times Wire Services
The U.S. military handed security responsibility for Wasit province to Iraqi authorities Wednesday, putting Baghdad in full control of 13 of the country's 18 provinces, including all of those in the mostly Shiite Muslim south. U.S. and Iraqi forces have been jointly seeking to shut down arms smuggling routes from Iran that use Wasit as a transit point before the weapons are taken elsewhere in Iraq. The weapons are thought to be going to Shiite militant groups. U.S.
WORLD
September 26, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker on Thursday accused Iran of "pushing very hard" to derail a security agreement that would authorize American troops to remain in Iraq past Dec. 31. Crocker also speculated that Iran may be tightening its ties to Shiite Muslim militias in Iraq and co-opting them from anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr, who for the last year has ordered his followers to largely refrain from violence.
WORLD
September 9, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Amid rising anger over civilian deaths in Afghanistan, President Bush says he is sending more forces to fight there, but cautions "there will be times" when U.S. strikes result in the loss of innocent life. In remarks prepared for delivery today to an audience of military officers, Bush is accepting recommendations from senior officers for a modest troop reduction in Iraq as part of a plan that would shift some units to Afghanistan. The new configuration reflects what Bush is calling a "degree of durability" in progress in Iraq.
WORLD
August 3, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Anxious to avoid a U.S. intervention or cutoff of funds, Pakistan's government is proposing military and intelligence changes that both countries say are needed to counter the growing threat from insurgents, officials say. Pakistan wants to deploy a specially trained unit of its Special Service Group into tribal areas along its western border. The region has become a haven for Al Qaeda and Taliban forces that increasingly are attacking Western soldiers in neighboring Afghanistan, officials say.
WORLD
July 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Prince William took part in a British navy helicopter raid that opened fire on a speedboat believed to be used by drug runners, the Ministry of Defense said. It was the second time the prince, second in line to the throne, has helped his crew mates on the Iron Duke go after suspected narcotics traffickers in the Caribbean as part of his program to gain experience in all the branches of the British armed forces. Royal Marine commandos aboard a Lynx used high-power, long-range rifles to disable the 30-foot vessel after it ignored warning shots.
WORLD
June 28, 2008 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
The southern Afghan province of Helmand, part of the Pashtun heartland from which the Taliban emerged in the 1990s, has become the most violent and narcotics-plagued region in the country by far, according to the first formal Pentagon report to Congress on the Afghan conflict. Security for Helmand is the chief responsibility of Britain, which has about 8,200 troops in the province. Since British forces took command of the province two years ago, 103 of their soldiers have been killed.
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