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Military Desertions

NATIONAL
February 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An Army hearing officer has recommended a court-martial for a soldier charged with desertion after he refused to deploy to Iraq. In a Feb. 16 report just released, Lt. Col. Linda Taylor recommended that Sgt. Kevin Benderman face a general court-martial, the most serious type. The procedure requires approval from Ft. Stewart's General Court-Martial Convening Authority. Benderman, 40, an Army mechanic, refused to accompany his unit Jan.
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NATIONAL
January 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Army has brought charges against a soldier who refused to return to Iraq for a second combat tour because he now objected to war, officials said Thursday. Sgt. Kevin Benderman notified his commanders Dec. 28 that he was seeking a discharge as a conscientious objector. He refused orders to deploy with his unit Jan. 8 while the Army processed his objector claim. Benderman was charged with desertion and a second count that accused him of intentionally skipping his deployment flight.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2005 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
An Army National Guard soldier said Tuesday that the inadequate training and equipment he received had led him to abandon his unit rather than face deployment to Iraq. "I guess I'm AWOL right now," Spc. Joseph Jacobo, 46, said in a telephone interview from the Los Angeles area. Among his concerns, Jacobo said, was that he had been unable to find anyone at his Texas training base who could fix his M-4 assault rifle, the primary weapon he would carry in Iraq. The weapon jams, he said.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Marine charged with desertion after he claimed to have been kidnapped last year in Iraq was again declared a deserter Wednesday after he failed to return from a holiday leave. Cpl. Wassef Ali Hassoun was required to return to Camp Lejeune by noon Tuesday, but did not report for duty in a motor pool, said Maj. Matt Morgan, a spokesman for the 4th Marine Expeditionary Brigade. Hassoun was still missing Wednesday, Morgan said.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2004 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
A Marine corporal who disappeared in June from a military camp near Fallouja, Iraq, and later turned up with relatives in Lebanon -- claiming he had been kidnapped and held hostage -- was charged Thursday with desertion. Wassef Ali Hassoun of West Jordan, Utah, also was charged with loss of government property and theft of a military firearm, accused of leaving the Marine camp with his service pistol, and with theft and wrongful appropriation of a government vehicle.
WORLD
December 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Army deserter Charles Robert Jenkins will move to his wife's hometown in northern Japan this week, days after his release from U.S. military prison and almost four decades after he defected to North Korea, the Japanese government said. Jenkins, his wife, Hitomi Soga, and their two daughters will head Friday to the small island of Sado. A U.S. military court sentenced Jenkins to 30 days in jail last month. He was released Saturday after serving 25 days.
WORLD
November 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
U.S. Army deserter Charles Robert Jenkins was released from military jail today after serving 25 days for abandoning his squadron in 1965 and defecting to North Korea, where he lived for nearly four decades. Jenkins, 64, left the prison at the U.S. naval base in Yokosuka and was taken by helicopter to the Camp Zama Army base, where he was to stay with his family for several days before moving to his wife's hometown in northern Japan.
WORLD
November 4, 2004 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Charles Robert Jenkins, the GI who deserted to North Korea, was given a 30-day sentence Wednesday by a military judge after testifying to four decades of harrowing conditions under the communist regime that were widely acknowledged to be worse than a prison term. The 64-year-old Jenkins, who frequently burst into tears during his court-martial at this U.S. military camp near Tokyo, said that he was kept in conditions of near-starvation and that the North Koreans removed the U.S.
WORLD
November 3, 2004 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 40 years after he vanished across the demilitarized zone into North Korea, Charles Robert Jenkins pleaded guilty in a U.S. military court here today to deserting the Army and aiding the enemy. In an emotional appearance at this base on the outskirts of Tokyo, the former GI said he abandoned his patrol in January 1965 and slipped into the communist country because he was depressed and feared being sent to Vietnam.
WORLD
September 29, 2004 | From Reuters
Thirty percent of former U.S. soldiers who have been called back to duty involuntarily to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan have failed to report on time, and eight have been declared AWOL, the Army said Tuesday. The Individual Ready Reserve is a seldom-tapped personnel pool made up of 111,000 people who have completed their voluntary Army service and returned to civilian life but remain eligible to be mobilized in a national emergency. Many left active duty years ago.
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