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NEWS
January 26, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former commander of the Navy's elite counterterrorism unit, SEAL Team Six, was convicted Wednesday of conspiracy to defraud the government for his part in a $113,000 kickback scheme on a hand grenade contract. Retired Navy Cmdr. Richard Marcincko, 48, a highly decorated Vietnam combat veteran, faces five years in prison and $50,000 in fines following his conviction in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va. The jury acquitted him on a separate bribery count after a week of testimony.
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WORLD
December 31, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pakistan suspended truck shipments of U.S. military supplies through the Khyber Pass on Tuesday after launching an offensive against militants who are trying to cripple Washington's war on a resurgent Taliban in neighboring Afghanistan. The U.S. military said a temporary closure of the key supply line was not a problem, and it praised the campaign in the rugged hills of northwestern Pakistan where Al Qaeda leaders -- including Osama bin Laden -- are believed to be hiding.
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WORLD
January 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Brazil is seeking to buy military technology from France that could help it become the first country in Latin America to have a nuclear submarine, the Defense Ministry said. Defense Minister Nelson Jobim went to France to discuss purchasing a diesel-powered Scorpene class submarine that would "serve as a model for the development of a nuclear submarine," said Defense Ministry spokesman Jose Ramos.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Their offices are remodeled railroad box cars. Visitors autograph the bathroom wall. The president of the company made his fortune selling cemetery plots. He drives a cream-colored Rolls-Royce, and gold--scads of it--is his jewelry of choice. They call themselves Red Eye Arms Inc. Their boast: the ability to build a plastic handgun, the next generation of firearms. Their motto: "We are the future in armament."
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Three men were convicted Friday of stealing $13 million worth of missile launchers, jeeps and other goods in the largest known theft of equipment from a U.S. military base. Convicted of conspiracy and conversion of government property were Dennis Lambert, 53, the base's former range maintenance officer; Loyd Pilgrim, 37, a military surplus dealer; and Grant Kruger, 43, president of the Military Vehicles and Arms Museum in Minnesota.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swedlow Inc., a Garden Grove maker of aircraft windows, pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court to one charge of lying to the Air Force about flaws in windshields that it made for the B-1B bomber and agreed to pay a $400,000 fine. Under a plea bargain agreement, U.S. District Court Judge Alicemarie H. Stotler in Santa Ana dismissed three other fraud charges against the company.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former high-ranking Air Force official pleaded guilty Thursday to accepting bribes and conspiring to defraud the government in the Operation Ill Wind investigation of Pentagon procurement fraud. Acting Atty. Gen. William P. Barr said the guilty plea by Victor D. Cohen was the 50th conviction obtained under the Ill Wind probe, which has been handled by the Naval Investigative Service, the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although the U.S. military had considerable experience shuttling troops and equipment between America and Europe, little consideration had been given before the Gulf conflict to transporting troops from Germany to other parts of the world. The enemy--the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact--was nearby, just over the border to the east. "Units in Germany never had a deployment mission," says Col. Thomas C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1994 | TERESA ANN WILLIS
Bruce Herman's Chatsworth office is a memorial to a time that is no more. The 35-year-old building owner, who works out of his home, collects military memorabilia ranging from his favorite collection of Prussian generals' helmets to a rare drum from the 73rd U.S. Army regiment, an African American unit that served in the Civil War. "Honor was such a prized virtue then," Herman said of the Civil War era.
WORLD
November 5, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived in China on Sunday, intending to question top Chinese officials about the purpose of their military buildup and pressure them to stop providing arms to Iran. Pentagon officials have accused China of supplying missile technology to Iran. They have also suggested that more mundane conventional arms designed or built by China have been smuggled by Iran into Iraq and Afghanistan. Chinese officials are well aware of U.S.
WORLD
September 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
China said it would provide the United Nations with information on its military spending and arms deals for the first time in more than a decade. The U.S. and Japan have questioned the pace and amount of China's defense spending. China will give "basic data of its military expenditures for the latest fiscal year," the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. The country already announces basic details of its military budget each year, and it was unknown what data it plans to give to the U.N.
WORLD
August 28, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
mosul, iraq -- Although Washington has made the readiness of Iraqi forces a key benchmark of progress, the Baghdad government is still failing to supply Iraqi commanders in this northern city with adequate equipment to go it alone, U.S. commanders say. Equipment shortages are a major concern in Mosul and other areas as U.S. offensives in Anbar province in the west and belts of cities surrounding Baghdad drive Al Qaeda in Iraq fighters and other militants north.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Despite protests from major U.S. corporations, the Bush administration on Friday tightened regulations governing the export to China of aircraft engines, high-performance computers and other technologies that have possible military uses. The Commerce Department added 31 products to a list that requires special export licenses in hopes of keeping them out of the hands of China's military.
WORLD
June 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Venezuela is considering buying Russian submarines that would transform the South American country into the region's top naval force, a military advisor to President Hugo Chavez said. Gen. Alberto Muller, responding to a Russian newspaper report that Chavez plans to sign a deal for five diesel submarines, said the government was "analyzing the possibilities" but that funding had not been allocated.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon, bearing the brunt of criticism for shortfalls in National Guard supplies after last week's devastating tornado in Kansas, acknowledged Wednesday that Army National Guard units had only 56% of their required equipment. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates told a Senate hearing that equipment levels were the lowest since the Sept. 11 attacks.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A burst of superheated steam killed 10 American sailors Tuesday in a boiler-room accident aboard a Navy assault ship, forcing a scale-back of a new exercise testing a possible amphibious landing in the Persian Gulf conflict. The break in a high-pressure steam line came just minutes after the 29-year-old Iwo Jima pulled out of port in Manama, Bahrain, where it had undergone five days of repairs, according to military officials here.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
The U.S. military logicians who so successfully built up the war machine in the Persian Gulf now have to build something else: the world's largest car wash. Before any of the 110,000 U.S. tanks, armored vehicles and cargo trucks used in Operation Desert Storm can be shipped home, ALL THE DIRT, GRIME AND DESERT MUCK MUST BE CLEANED OFF to the satisfaction of inspectors from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have depleted the equipment inventory of the National Guard, potentially hampering its response to the predicted heavy hurricane season, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) said Monday. The Florida National Guard has only 53% of the dual-use equipment it once had for responding to a storm or domestic disturbance, a recent analysis by the Government Accountability Office found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A California man accused of trying to supply stolen U.S. military equipment and defense secrets to Yemen was denied bail Friday after a prosecutor said the man had ties to a terrorist financier who plotted to help Al Qaeda and Hamas. The allegations emerged at a hearing for Amen Ahmed Ali, 56.
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