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Military Equipment And Supplies

NEWS
April 30, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego area liquor store operator who wanted to be an international munitions trafficker was sentenced Thursday to more than three years in prison for trying to sell military night vision goggles to his native Iraq in violation of U.S. arms and export laws. The sentencing in federal court in Connecticut culminated a three-year undercover investigation by the U.S. Customs Service into the activities of 37-year-old Fadi Boutros, an Iraqi immigrant who settled in La Mesa.
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NATIONAL
July 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Undercover government investigators purchased sensitive surplus military equipment, such as launcher mounts for shoulder-fired missiles and guided missile radar test-sets, from a Defense Department contractor. Much of the equipment could be useful to terrorists, according to a draft report by the Government Accountability Office. In June, two GAO investigators spent $1.1 million on such equipment at two excess-property warehouses.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is putting its money where its mouth is on the question of whether the Cold War really is over: It is selling off a big chunk of the nation's strategic stockpile, which was created to hoard scarce commodities that might be needed in a global war. Over the last few months, the National Defense Stockpile, the Arlington, Va., agency that oversees the nation's $6.3-billion strategic inventory, has greatly expanded the volume of goods it seeks to sell.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A British manufacturer of gun barrels denied Thursday that eight crates of piping impounded by customs officials contained sections of a "super gun" destined for Iraq. Echoing the Iraqi ambassador, the firm said the crates contain pipes for petrochemical use. However, British military experts Thursday examined the contents of the crates, seized the day before in the northeast England port of Middlesbrough.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Pentagon has delayed awarding millions of dollars in contracts to Toshiba Corp. while Japan investigates charges that the company sold secret high-tech equipment to the Soviets for building quieter submarines, officials said Tuesday. Among the Toshiba contracts jeopardized by the action is the proposed purchase of 90,000 laptop computers for the Air Force valued at $100 million. The company, responding to U.S.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Quietly and without any public debate, the Bush Administration is preparing drastic changes in the basic U.S. strategy for fighting a nuclear war with the Soviet Union, including the creation of new weapons so devastating that they could penetrate the deepest underground bunkers and "decapitate" the entire Soviet leadership.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Northrop Corp. pleaded guilty to 34 criminal fraud charges Tuesday and agreed to pay the government $17 million, one of the largest fines ever assessed a defense contractor, to end a massive criminal case. "This is a very significant victory in our efforts to combat defense contracting fraud and misconduct," said Assistant U.S. Atty. William F. Fahey, lead prosecutor in the case.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An engineer who quit his job with a Garden Grove defense contractor sued his former employer Tuesday, alleging he was driven out because he blew the whistle on a scheme to defraud the government. John A. Trepl II contends that officials of Swedlow Inc. began to pressure him last year after he refused to cooperate in the firm's alleged scheme to cover up flaws in windshields it manufactured for the B-1B bomber. Trepl also said he alerted the FBI to the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Harbor Patrol recovered a floating landing gear assembly that broke off a Yuma, Ariz.-based military jet aircraft while it was apparently operating over the Pacific Ocean, the Sheriff's Department said Saturday. The wheel assembly, the center of the intricate landing gear of an AV-8 Harrier jet fighter, was found floating in the ocean about 1 1/4 miles southwest of Newport Harbor, said Sgt. John K. Holani of the Sheriff's Department Harbor Patrol.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors Wednesday charged VSI Corp. of Culver City and two employees with falsifying and omitting test results for fasteners used in commercial and military aircraft. A lawyer representing a company whistle-blower said he expects VSI and the employees to plead guilty today in U.S. District Court in Seattle.
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