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Military Exemptions

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NEWS
July 4, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Melchior is an Orthodox rabbi and a Cabinet minister in the government of Prime Minister Ehud Barak. When a bitter debate opened in parliament Monday on a controversial bill that enshrines military exemptions for religious men, Melchior serenely gave it his support. Melchior's son Yair is 17 and will soon be drafted into the Israeli army. Outside the halls of parliament, Yair is leading a movement against the bill his father advocates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A proposal before the Berkeley City Council next week would have phone calls seeking information on avoiding military combat referred to the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors. The Peace and Justice Commission will ask the council to approve a plan to make the phone number and Web address of the organization available to staff members answering city phone lines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A proposal before the Berkeley City Council next week would have phone calls seeking information on avoiding military combat referred to the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors. The Peace and Justice Commission will ask the council to approve a plan to make the phone number and Web address of the organization available to staff members answering city phone lines.
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Melchior is an Orthodox rabbi and a Cabinet minister in the government of Prime Minister Ehud Barak. When a bitter debate opened in parliament Monday on a controversial bill that enshrines military exemptions for religious men, Melchior serenely gave it his support. Melchior's son Yair is 17 and will soon be drafted into the Israeli army. Outside the halls of parliament, Yair is leading a movement against the bill his father advocates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1990
The city of Los Angeles may ask the military to exempt reserve police officers and firefighters from being called into active duty because they are needed to fight "a war waging here," City Councilman Nate Holden said this week. Holden, who wrote to President Bush asking that reservist police officers be overlooked for active duty because of the nature of their jobs, said 114 people have been killed in Los Angeles since the U.S. military action in the Persian Gulf began seven weeks ago.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Rep. Toby Roth (R-Wis.) has introduced legislation that would direct the Defense Department to allow immediate members of a family to be exempted from service within the same combat zone. With Roth at a press conference was Jim Sullivan, the only son of Albert Sullivan, the youngest of the five Sullivan brothers, who died when their ship was sunk during World War II.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | Reuters
Iran said Tuesday it will sell permanent military exemption cards to some draft dodgers at $16,600 each. The money--about 30 years' earnings at the minimum wage--will be kept as a deposit and returned to those who change their mind and complete the two-year term of service, officials said. Officials quoted by the Iranian news agency IRNA said the offer covers only men of draft age who legally left the country before March 8, 1989. They can pay either dollars or the equivalent in Iranian rials.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | Reuters
The Jordanian government has decided to sell exemption from military service to citizens working abroad. The cost of exemption is likely to be about $10,000 payable in foreign currency, a Cabinet minister who declined to be named said Sunday. The decision, made at a Cabinet meeting Saturday, will also allow overseas workers to buy exemptions for their sons. The buyout has often been requested by spokesmen for 375,000 Jordanians employed abroad, most of whom live in Persian Gulf oil states.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Farmers will receive smaller price-support checks. The federal meat inspection service could be forced to shut down for a month. The AIDS research budget will be reduced. And the Federal Aviation Administration might become a "disaster." Those, officials warn, are just some of the consequences of the across-the-board spending cuts mandated by the Gramm-Rudman law, which President Reagan is to implement today.
NEWS
November 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir and leaders of his right-wing Likud Party expressed confidence today that they can form a government and began coalition talks with four ultra-Orthodox religious parties that won a total of 18 parliament seats. Likud and its allies won 46 of the 120 seats in Tuesday's election. Labor and sympathetic left-wing parties won 49, so either major party could form a government with support from the religious factions.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | Reuters
Iran said Tuesday it will sell permanent military exemption cards to some draft dodgers at $16,600 each. The money--about 30 years' earnings at the minimum wage--will be kept as a deposit and returned to those who change their mind and complete the two-year term of service, officials said. Officials quoted by the Iranian news agency IRNA said the offer covers only men of draft age who legally left the country before March 8, 1989. They can pay either dollars or the equivalent in Iranian rials.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Rep. Toby Roth (R-Wis.) has introduced legislation that would direct the Defense Department to allow immediate members of a family to be exempted from service within the same combat zone. With Roth at a press conference was Jim Sullivan, the only son of Albert Sullivan, the youngest of the five Sullivan brothers, who died when their ship was sunk during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1990
The city of Los Angeles may ask the military to exempt reserve police officers and firefighters from being called into active duty because they are needed to fight "a war waging here," City Councilman Nate Holden said this week. Holden, who wrote to President Bush asking that reservist police officers be overlooked for active duty because of the nature of their jobs, said 114 people have been killed in Los Angeles since the U.S. military action in the Persian Gulf began seven weeks ago.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | Reuters
The Jordanian government has decided to sell exemption from military service to citizens working abroad. The cost of exemption is likely to be about $10,000 payable in foreign currency, a Cabinet minister who declined to be named said Sunday. The decision, made at a Cabinet meeting Saturday, will also allow overseas workers to buy exemptions for their sons. The buyout has often been requested by spokesmen for 375,000 Jordanians employed abroad, most of whom live in Persian Gulf oil states.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Farmers will receive smaller price-support checks. The federal meat inspection service could be forced to shut down for a month. The AIDS research budget will be reduced. And the Federal Aviation Administration might become a "disaster." Those, officials warn, are just some of the consequences of the across-the-board spending cuts mandated by the Gramm-Rudman law, which President Reagan is to implement today.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as he vowed to pursue a "secular revolution" in Israel's legal and education systems, Prime Minister Ehud Barak appeared more politically isolated than ever Monday, with his popularity sagging and his style of governance under public attack from his closest aides. Barak has been ruling in a minority government since July, when several coalition partners defected over his efforts to make peace with the Palestinians.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration is seeking to restrict protections for marine mammals as part of a sweeping proposal to exempt the military from key provisions of environmental legislation. The Pentagon's proposed changes to six landmark environmental laws were presented to Congress in briefings Thursday. Draft legislation was delivered Friday evening to Capitol Hill. Members of Congress begin drafting the defense authorization bill next week.
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