Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMilitary Helicopters
IN THE NEWS

Military Helicopters

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 5, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. acquired closely held Frontier Systems Inc., giving Boeing its first military-reconnaissance helicopter that may compete against Northrop Grumman Corp.'s new model. The value of the deal wasn't disclosed. Irvine-based Frontier has been working on the A-160 Hummingbird helicopter under a contract with the U.S. military's research arm. The Army may fund development and purchases of the aircraft, said Dina Hyde, Boeing's program manager for the aircraft.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Zaid Ali and Laura King, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
SANA, Yemen -- In a strike that bore the hallmarks of Al Qaeda, assailants in military uniforms staged a brazen daytime assault Thursday on Yemen's defense ministry, setting off a daylong battle that killed at least four dozen people and left scores injured, with some foreigners believed to be among the dead. The attack, which terrorized residents of a crowded district in the capital's old city , began with a thunderous car-bomb blast at the compound's gate, and a separate push by fighters on foot and armed with assault weapons.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1989
The noise of military helicopters over Laguna Beach is absolutely unnecessary and unacceptable. Let me state that I have lived in Laguna for over 30 years, am a patriotic taxpayer and have always been tolerant of our military neighbors from El Toro, Tustin and Pendleton. However, I believe something has changed over the years, and our military neighbors are now abusing us. In the old days, we grew accustomed to the occasional ruckus of the El Toro jets scrambling out over our heads.
WORLD
July 26, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- Egypt's political divisions seethed Friday as rival rallies between opponents and supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi surged through cities, and the army increased pressure on Islamists to abandon a month-long sit-in outside a Cairo mosque. The nation's volatile atmosphere -- tanks clattered and riot police gathered -- sharpened hours after state media reported that prosecutors accused Morsi of espionage, murder and conspiring with the Palestinian militant group Hamas.
NEWS
July 27, 1985 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
For the first time, U.S. military helicopters will be used to distribute food in famine-stricken Sudan, where recent rains have washed out many roads and railroad tracks but brought no relief to starving villagers, aid officials announced Friday. Three cargo helicopters will begin a three-month airlift in western Sudan within two weeks, M. Peter McPherson, administrator of the Agency for International Development, said at a news briefing. He said that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1986
At the request of Rep. Robert Badham (R-Newport Beach), Congress will investigate the crashes of the nation's largest military helicopters in which 15 people have died in two years. Badham requested the investigation of the CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter two weeks ago after one from the Marine base in Tustin crashed near Twentynine Palms, killing four Marines.
NEWS
September 5, 1998 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the worst training accidents in recent Air Force history, all 12 crew members aboard a pair of rescue squadron helicopters were killed early Friday when their choppers crashed in the darkness of the Nevada desert. The two Pave Hawk helicopters were nearing the end of a routine four-hour training mission when they went down shortly after midnight about 55 miles north of Las Vegas in a mountain region that reaches heights of 6,800 feet, military officials said.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military helicopters had evacuated 82 Americans and more than 300 other foreigners from Liberia as of Wednesday, but officials said that amid continuing fighting other Americans were having difficulty reaching the fortified U.S. Embassy compound where the flights are originating. With the capital, Monrovia, still tense despite a partly effective cease-fire that began late Tuesday night, the U.S. government pledged to evacuate all Americans who want to leave the nation torn by civil war.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Unlike most women in Afghanistan, Sourya Saleh knows how to drive - but she's taken the wheel only with her brother beside her, out of respect for tradition. Her friend Masooma Hussaini is still learning. Both young women, though, are experts in a more demanding mode of travel: They've flown 204 hours each as pilots of military helicopters. The first female chopper pilots in Afghanistan since the Soviets trained a woman as a pilot in the 1980s, these two young Afghans are pioneers in a land where a resurgent Taliban is determined to deny girls the right to an education, and violence against women is on the rise.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal agents who carried out the original raid of a religious sect's fortified compound two years ago near Waco, Tex., were unsuccessful because of unreliable intelligence and inadequate communication, experts testified Thursday. Donald A. Bassett, a former crisis-management specialist for the FBI, testified on the second day of congressional hearings on events at Waco that the raid was doomed when the element of surprise was lost.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Amro Hassan
CAIRO - At least 10 people were killed in street battles and clashes with security forces as supporters of Egypt's deposed Islamist president rallied in Cairo and elsewhere Friday in the first major show of defiance against what they termed an illegal military coup. As night fell and military helicopters circled the capital, supporters and opponents of ousted President Mohamed Morsi clashed on the bridges and overpasses leading to Tahrir Square, the heart of the protests that forced Morsi's removal Wednesday.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The spiritual leader of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood made a dramatic appearance Friday before tens of thousands of chanting supporters and denounced as “illegal” the military coup that ousted the country's Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi. “Our president is Mohamed Morsi,” the Brotherhood's supreme guide, Mohamed Badie, told the crowd, vowing that “our souls will be sacrificed” to return Morsi to power. The rousing speech by Badie, who had reportedly been under military arrest, was a show of defiance against the removal of Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president.
WORLD
January 17, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The Algerian military on Thursday launched a raid to retake a natural gas complex from Islamic militants who seized the compound a day earlier and took scores of hostages, including Americans, Britons and Japanese. Conflicting reports of casualties emerged. The Algerian news agency reported that as many as 45 hostages, including Americans, escaped the site in the Sahara Desert near the Algerian-Libyan border. Algeria media reports later in the day said that only between four and six foreign hostages were freed and that were a number of "victims.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Unlike most women in Afghanistan, Sourya Saleh knows how to drive - but she's taken the wheel only with her brother beside her, out of respect for tradition. Her friend Masooma Hussaini is still learning. Both young women, though, are experts in a more demanding mode of travel: They've flown 204 hours each as pilots of military helicopters. The first female chopper pilots in Afghanistan since the Soviets trained a woman as a pilot in the 1980s, these two young Afghans are pioneers in a land where a resurgent Taliban is determined to deny girls the right to an education, and violence against women is on the rise.
WORLD
June 24, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptians wept and hugged as fireworks exploded in Tahrir Square and their world suddenly changed. Tears in their eyes, men, in some cases accompanied by their families, congratulated one another as throngs pushed in on roads and bridges leading from the Nile. In all, tens of thousands of Egyptians took to the square to celebrate the election of Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi as the nation's first Islamist president. Although many in the crowd were ecstatic, others acknowledged that they were bracing for the struggle to come as Morsi inherits a country with a battered economy and ruling military still very much in power after President Hosni Mubarak's overthrow 16 months ago. The square - the battered, graffiti-streaked epicenter of Egypt's popular revolt - is where Egyptians have flocked to pour out their joy over the election results and their grievances about the military.
WORLD
February 23, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
  A Pakistani American businessman told a judicial panel Wednesday that Pakistani officials enlisted him last year to deliver a memo urging Washington to help rein in the country's powerful military, saying the idea was pushed by the nation's then-ambassador to the U.S. and endorsed by President Asif Ali Zardari. Mansoor Ijaz testified that during a phone call in the days after the May 2 killing of Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in a U.S. commando raid, a noticeably agitated Husain Haqqani, the ambassador at the time, said Zardari's government was "under enormous pressure" fromPakistan's military.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Capt. Bob Swain had just fired two Maverick missiles at Iraqi tanks in central Kuwait when he saw something moving far below, several miles away. "I noticed two black dots running across the desert that looked really different than anything I had seen before," said Swain, an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot. "They weren't putting up any dust and they were moving fast and quickly over the desert." Swain radioed his accompanying observation plane: "Hey, I think I've got a helicopter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1989 | JEFF MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Investigators were combing a crash site in South Korea, trying to determine why a Tustin-based transport helicopter went out of control and crashed during a training exercise, a Marine Corps spokesman said Saturday. The pilot and three crewmen, who were attached to the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing based in Tustin, died. The copter crashed in a rice field 280 miles southeast of Tokyo while on a joint U.S.-South Korean training mission known as Team Spirit '89.
OPINION
May 12, 2011
What's in a name Re "Dishonored," Opinion, May 10 Karl Jacoby's general issue with how Americans do not fully grasp our Native American past is true in many respects, but I did not take the military code-name "Geronimo" as denigrating to the Apache leader. Quite the contrary. Whether we were playing games as kids or riding a roller- coaster, to yell out "Geronimo" was something of a war cry, a battle yell — shouting the name of that brave warrior to provide adrenaline and courage.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: What can I expect from my Textron Inc. stock? I am a longtime shareholder. Answer: This manufacturer of Cessna planes and Bell helicopters is seeking to regain altitude after a nose dive in the recession. The company's Cessna unit is the leading maker of business jets, while Bell is a top supplier of commercial and military helicopters, including aircraft used in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The firm is also known for unmanned aircraft and military communication systems.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|