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NEWS
July 19, 1990 | From Times wire services
Six Army soldiers who deserted their military intelligence post in West Germany and were arrested in Florida told other soldiers they were leaving to find and destroy the "anti-Christ," it was reported today. The European edition of the military newspaper Stars and Stripes, citing Army sources, said the six soldiers destroyed or gave away all of their personal belongings before leaving their 701st Military Intelligence Brigade in Augsburg, West Germany, earlier this month.
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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence agencies disagreed on whether Russian President Vladimir Putin would order military intervention last week in Ukraine, officials said Tuesday, and the House Intelligence Committee is examining what caused the differing analyses. “We have begun a review to see what pieces were missing here,” said Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) who chairs the House Intelligence Committee. Lawmakers who read the competing intelligence analyses say they were given little guidance of what to believe, and were surprised last Friday when the Russians began taking control of border posts, airports and regional government facilities in Crimea.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Thomas B. Ross, 73, a journalist and author of books on military intelligence who served as the Pentagon spokesman during the Jimmy Carter administration, died of pancreatic cancer Thursday in a Long Island hospital. Ross was the Washington bureau chief for the Chicago Sun-Times when an American spy plane, piloted by Francis Gary Powers, was shot down over Russian territory in 1962. Ross and his co-author, David Wise, investigated the incident and published "The U-2 Affair."
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Laura King
CAIRO - In the latest of an intensifying pattern of attacks in and near the Suez Canal city of Ismailia, a powerful car bomb exploded Saturday outside a military intelligence compound, injuring six soldiers, the Egyptian military said. The army's chief spokesman, Col. Ahmed Ali, said on his Facebook page that the injuries were not life-threatening. The compound's outer wall was damaged in the midafternoon blast, which came on the first working day following the Eid al-Adha holiday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1992 | Tony Perry
Some things make more sense than others. * Bob Bayer, a copy editor at the San Diego County Edition of The Times, swears he saw this scene at Parkway Plaza in El Cajon: A young woman (a true denizen of the mall culture) walks up to a male counterpart and asks: "Have you seen a long-haired guy with short hair around here?" Sure, right next to the tall short guy. * Great moments in diplomacy. San Marcos is thinking of forming a sister-city relationship with Nakagawa, Japan.
WORLD
September 12, 2004 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. military intelligence soldier who blamed wartime stress for his abuse of detainees at Abu Ghraib prison was sentenced Saturday to eight months in prison, a reduction in rank and a bad-conduct discharge. Spc. Armin J. Cruz, 24, was the first military intelligence soldier to be convicted in the scandal that shocked the world when photographs of Iraqi detainees suffering physical and sexual abuse were made public. A military policeman also has been convicted.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Supreme Court justice has ruled against the prosecution of military intelligence agents for the abduction and murder of Carmen Soria, a U.N. official and Spanish citizen killed here in 1976. The Thursday ruling confirmed an earlier decision by a military court to close the Soria case, a notorious emblem of unredressed human rights violations under Chile's former dictatorship. Gen.
WORLD
June 18, 2003 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
A sweeping overhaul of the search for Saddam Hussein's suspected weapons of mass destruction is creating an operation with striking similarities to the United Nations inspection system that Bush administration officials openly derided before the war, according to senior military and intelligence officials here. Unlike the U.N. teams, however, the new weapons hunt will rely chiefly on "secret squirrels," as U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2007 | Richard Winton, Tony Perry, and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Federal and local investigations were underway Thursday into allegations by a Marine gunnery sergeant that he gave stolen top-secret antiterrorism files to a Los Angeles Police Department officer and an L.A. County sheriff's detective. Authorities said the probes by the FBI, LAPD internal affairs and Naval Criminal Investigative Service come after Gunnery Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992
Given politics and politicians in general, "political correctness" is like "military intelligence": a real good example of an oxymoron. With the emphasis on moron. MARJORY COYLE Lakewood
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- The military jury that will decide the fate of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers in a bloody rampage at this military base, is an elite group -- all officers of his rank or higher. Drawn from throughout the Army, the jury includes nine colonels, three lieutenant colonels and one major flown in from bases across the country. They will operate under rules that prevent hung juries and that encourage officers of differing ranks to speak freely and as equals once deliberations begin.  The jurors have worked as engineers and logistics specialists and in military intelligence, aviation, chemicals, ordnance, air defense artillery and the signal corps.
WORLD
July 3, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
June 30, 2012:   Mohamed Morsi, a U.S.-educated engineer and activist with the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, is sworn in as Egypt's first freely elected president. Morsi won 52% of the votes in a runoff election two weeks earlier and will rule over a deeply divided country. The military hierarchy, which has governed during the chaotic 16 months since President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown, will retain power over the armed forces, security and budget until a new constitution is drafted.
WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Seven Egyptian soldiers who had been abducted in the Sinai last week were set free by their captors early Wednesday amid conflicting reports as to how their release was secured. Many local news websites reported that tribe leaders in the Sinai mediated negotiations between authorities and the abductors. But the office of Egypt's president denied reports that concessions were made to win their release. “The seven abducted Egyptian soldiers are on their way to Cairo after they were released as a result of the efforts of the Egyptian military intelligence in cooperation with the honorable tribal leaders and residents of Sinai,” Egypt's military spokesman Col. Ahmed Ali, had posted on his official Facebook page earlier.
WORLD
April 23, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Israel's accusation that Syria used chemical weapons against rebels raises the prospect that Damascus crossed what President Obama has termed a "red line," but appears unlikely to overcome deep resistance of the U.S. and its allies to military involvement in the country's civil war. Brig. Gen. Itai Brun, Israel's top military intelligence analyst, said at a security conference in Tel Aviv on Tuesday that Syria used chemical weapons, probably a sarin-based nerve agent, in attacks March 19 near Aleppo and Damascus.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali, Washington Bureau
FT. MEADE, Md. - Pfc. Bradley Manning swiveled in the witness chair, smiling and occasionally talking over his lawyer. In his Army dress-blue uniform, he appeared even younger than his 24 years. It was difficult to reconcile the bespectacled Manning's relaxed, almost chatty demeanor with the vast charges against him - perpetrating one of the biggest leaks of classified material in U.S. history. Manning is accused of providing the anti-secrecy Internet group WikiLeaks with hundreds of thousands of U.S. diplomatic cables and classified war logs from Afghanistan and Iraq while based in Baghdad as a military intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010.
WORLD
August 12, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on Sunday purged the nation's military leadership in a provocative move to expand his power and push aside generals who epitomized the inner circle of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak. The dismissals, including the forced retirement of Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, who led the military council that had ruled for more than a year, stunned a nation engulfed in months of political turmoil. The president also scrapped a constitutional declaration by the generals that had dramatically constrained his authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1994
It's a sad truth of modern life that while "military intelligence" is an oxymoron, "criminal attorney" isn't. BURT PRELUTSKY North Hills
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | From Times wire services
Tass press agency said today that Soviet military intelligence has cut its operations by 10%, closing down more than 20 counterintelligence units in the armed forces. Tass quoted the weekly government bulletin Pravitelstvyenny Vyestnik as saying military intelligence, the GRU, had made the cuts in line with general reductions in the Soviet armed forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman
Omar Suleiman, Egypt's former spymaster and a confidant of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak, died Thursday in a U.S. hospital, months after his unsuccessful presidential bid to restore the old guard to power after a national revolution, state media reported. He was 76. There were conflicting reports about the cause of death. The Egyptian Embassy in Washington said Suleiman died of a blood illness, according to the Ahram Online news website. The state news agency MENA reported that he died of a heart attack while undergoing tests in a Cleveland hospital.
WORLD
December 29, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
After a U.S. airstrike mistakenly killed at least 15 Afghans in 2010, the Army officer investigating the accident was surprised to discover that an American civilian had played a central role: analyzing video feeds from a Predator drone keeping watch from above. The contractor had overseen other analysts at Air Force Special Operations Command at Hurlburt Field in Florida as the drone tracked suspected insurgents near a small unit of U.S. soldiers in rugged hills of central Afghanistan.
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