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Military Leaders

WORLD
January 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates warned Saturday that China's development of advanced missiles and a new stealth fighter could endanger U.S. naval and air forces, and he said the Pentagon would "respond appropriately. " 4 a.m. update: U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has arrived in Beijing. "They clearly have the potential to put some of our capabilities at risk, and we have to pay attention to them. We have to respond appropriately with our own programs," Gates told reporters as he traveled to Beijing for three days of talks with senior Chinese leaders.
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WORLD
September 24, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
The Colombian armed forces delivered a major blow to the nation's largest insurgent group, killing a key rebel leader at his base camp in a remote area of southeastern Meta state. President Juan Manuel Santos, in New York to attend a session of the United Nations, confirmed Thursday that longtime rebel leader Victor Julio Suarez Rojas, 57, had been killed in an operation carried out Wednesday and early Thursday by 600 troops, led by special forces and supported by 27 helicopters and 30 other aircraft.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
A bombing at a martial parade in western Iran on Wednesday killed at least 12 people, including a 5-year-old and the wives of two Iranian military commanders. The explosion struck amid a large crowd attending the event, which was intended to underscore the nation's battle readiness. An additional 75 people were injured, at least 12 seriously, in what officials described as a "terrorist attack. " No one immediately claimed responsibility for the bombing, which occurred in the restive ethnic Kurdish city of Mahabad about 40 miles east of the border with Iraq.
WORLD
June 24, 2010 | Julian E. Barnes and Christi Parsons, reporting from washington
President Obama relieved Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal of command in Afghanistan on Wednesday, replacing him with the architect of the Iraq troop "surge," Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, in a move meant to reassert the authority of the White House while ensuring the continuity of its war strategy. In remarks at the Rose Garden, Obama said he was removing McChrystal with regret but believed that the general's conduct had undermined civilian control of the military. "War is bigger than any one man or woman, whether a private, a general or a president," Obama said.
OPINION
June 23, 2010
It's no surprise that voters in Colombia chose a tough former defense minister to succeed outgoing President Alvaro Uribe, who is leaving office after two terms. A resounding 69% of those who cast ballots opted for continuity, replacing Uribe, who made serious headway against the leftist guerrillas seeking to overthrow the government, with the man who helped him do it, Juan Manuel Santos. Santos' military's successes against the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia included a daring operation in which rebels were duped into freeing high-profile hostages, and a cross-border raid into Ecuador in which the FARC's No. 2 was killed.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama reached a deal with key Democrats on Monday that could repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy governing gays and lesbians in the military — assuming Congress signs on. The proposal would let lawmakers vote now to repeal the law and allow people who are openly gay to serve, once the president and top military leaders certify that the repeal wouldn't threaten the military's "readiness, effectiveness, unit cohesion, and...
OPINION
April 12, 2010 | By Timothy Rieger
The military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy is an easy target for an editorial board to express its moral indignation over the lies of U.S. military leaders. The Times has published several editorials on the subject, most recently the March 29 piece on retired Marine Gen. John Sheehan's false allegations that gay Dutch troops were partly to blame for the Srebrenica massacre. The comments are inexcusable, but as a gay American I thoroughly reject the notion that we ought to be focused on repealing "don't ask, don't tell" before addressing the far greater threats that the U.S. military structure poses to American democracy.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes
The commandant of the Marine Corps said Thursday that gays should not be allowed to serve openly in the military, becoming the most senior commander to break from President Obama's goal of lifting the ban. Gen. James T. Conway, testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee, said the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" should be left alone. "I think the current policy works," he said. "My best military advice to this committee, to the secretary, to the president, would be to keep the law such as it is."
OPINION
December 8, 2009 | By John Kerry
Eight years ago this month, Osama bin Laden walked out of the Tora Bora mountains in Afghanistan and disappeared into Pakistan. U.S. intelligence agencies have no real idea where he is today, but it is clear that the world's most wanted man and the terrorist organization he leads have reemerged as a powerful force behind the increasingly deadly insurgencies in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Three senior Obama administration officials warned last week that Al Qaeda is more dangerous than at any time in the last 18 months.
WORLD
November 30, 2009 | By Christi Parsons
Hours after issuing orders to launch his new strategy in Afghanistan, President Obama this morning began calling world leaders to tell them of his decision and ask for their assistance. But Obama does not plan to disclose the number of new troops he will deploy to the war zone until Tuesday, when he plans to inform a bipartisan group of members of Congress at the White House and then address the nation in a speech from West Point. "He's not going to get overly specific" in his calls to world leaders, Press Secretary Robert Gibbs told reporters this morning.
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