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Military Misconduct

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2007 | Joe Mozingo and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. attorney in Los Angeles has filed charges against a former Marine sergeant for his alleged role in the killing of eight unarmed Iraqi prisoners during a November 2004 battle in Fallouja, according to military and civilian sources. Jose Nazario, a Murrieta resident who worked as a sworn officer in the Riverside Police Department until his termination last week, is expected to appear in a federal courtroom in Riverside today.
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NATIONAL
August 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A soldier charged with beating an Iraqi detainee with a baseball bat and trying to cover it up was convicted at Ft. Lee and sentenced to be reprimanded. A six-person military jury convicted Sgt. 1st Class Timothy L. Drake, 40, of assault and making false statements but acquitted him of impeding the investigation and encouraging a fellow soldier to beat a detainee. Drake will not serve jail time.
WORLD
August 11, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The last of five infantry squad members who pleaded guilty in the kidnapping and killing last year of an unarmed Iraqi man in Hamandiya was freed Friday after a review of his sentence. Lt. Gen. James N. Mattis, commanding general of Marine Forces Central Command, ordered the release of Marine Pvt. Robert Pennington, who had served 15 months of an eight-year sentence, after a meeting at Camp Pendleton with Pennington and his parents.
WORLD
August 8, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Two Marines who admitted taking part in the kidnapping and killing of an unarmed Iraqi man have been released from the brig at Camp Pendleton, the Marine Corps announced Tuesday, leaving only one of the five men who pleaded guilty still behind bars. Tyler A. Jackson and Jerry E. Shumate Jr. were ordered released by Lt. Gen. James N. Mattis, commanding general of the Marine Forces Central Command.
WORLD
August 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A soldier convicted of the rape and murder of an Iraqi teenager and the murders of her family members was sentenced Saturday to 110 years in prison. The sentence was part of a plea agreement attorneys for Army Pfc. Jesse Spielman had made with prosecutors that set the number of years he could serve in prison, regardless of the jury's recommendation. He will be eligible for parole after 10 years.
WORLD
August 4, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The ringleader of a plot by Marines to kidnap and kill an Iraqi man in Hamandiya last year was given a dishonorable discharge Friday and sentenced to 15 years in prison, the harshest sentence of the eight men convicted in the case. Prosecutors in the court-martial of Sgt. Lawrence G. Hutchins III had sought 30 years in prison and a dishonorable discharge. Hutchins, a squad leader, was found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder and unpremeditated murder.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A Ft. Campbell soldier accused of acting as a lookout while his colleagues attacked and killed a 14-year-old Iraqi girl and her family pleaded guilty to lesser offenses as his court-martial began on rape and murder charges. Pfc. Jesse V. Spielman, 22, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obstruct justice, arson, wrongfully touching a corpse, and drinking in the March 2006 attack on Abeer Kassem Hamza Janabi and her family. He still faces trial on more serious charges.
WORLD
July 25, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
With tears in his eyes and his voice breaking, a Marine lance corporal facing six murder charges told a hearing officer Tuesday that he did not realize there were Iraqi women and children in the line of fire when he began hurling grenades and firing his M-16. "It was dark," said Lance Cpl. Stephen B. Tatum. "I couldn't make out a lot -- just targets.... I didn't know there were women and children in that house until later." Tatum, 26, of Edmond, Okla.
WORLD
July 22, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Cpl. Trent D. Thomas had all the makings of a recruiting-poster Marine: a decorated warrior, devoted to his fellow grunts, hugely appreciative of the Marine Corps for helping him escape an impoverished upbringing in East St. Louis. But he was also a leader in the kidnapping and killing of an unarmed man in the Iraqi village of Hamandiya and then lying to superiors about it.
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