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NEWS
April 24, 1999
the basic element of NATO's structure is the national authority of its 19 members. Representatives to NATO present and vote on proposals based on the policies of their respective governments. For Operation Allied Force, NATO's campaign in Yugoslavia, the chain of command for day-to-day operations is as follows:
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BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
For more than 15 years, a $518-million military weather satellite sat in a clean room at Lockheed Martin Corp.'s facility in Sunnyvale waiting for the day it would be launched into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base. On Thursday morning, the spacecraft is finally set to be blasted into space atop Atlas V rocket. It will be the latest satellite launched in support of the military's long-running Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, a satellite system initiated in 1962.
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WORLD
August 9, 2008 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
In Mexico's drug war, Gen. Sergio Aponte Polito racked up crime-fighting credentials worthy of the Dark Knight, making record seizures of drugs and weapons and forcing out top Baja California law enforcement officials he accused of corruption and of having links to organized crime.
WORLD
October 1, 2013 | By Ralph Jennings
TAIPEI, Taiwan - An American woman who used a mocking video to quit her job at an animated graphics company here has virally showcased Taiwan's demanding work conditions, which sometimes mean taking a cot to the office and have even led to death from fatigue. The video posted Monday by Next Media Animation content editor Marina Shifrin shows the writer and comedian dancing through her Taipei office at 4:30 a.m. to lyrics to the Kayne West song “Gone.” As she makes her way toward a dark doorway, presumably for the last time, video subtitles say that for two years she has sacrificed time, energy and relationships to work.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - The case against six Mexican military officers accused of colluding with the Beltran Leyva drug cartel may be falling apart as federal prosecutors under new President Enrique Peña Nieto have reportedly admitted they lack sufficient evidence to back up the government's allegations. The prosecutors' statement to a federal judge presiding over the criminal case was included in court documents obtained by the newspaper Reforma and published Tuesday. A representative of the Mexican attorney general's office would not comment.
WORLD
September 22, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Two former Turkish generals and a retired admiral were among more than 300 ex-officers sentenced to prison terms Friday in a controversial case that highlighted tensions between Turkey's civilian government and the long-powerful military. The three ex-commanders were convicted in Istanbul, Turkey, of being the ringleaders of a complex plot to "overthrow the government by force" almost a decade ago and were initially sentenced to life in prison, Turkish news reports said.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica retired 13 top military officers, including indicted war criminal Gen. Dragoljub Ojdanic, a former army chief, the state-run Tanjug news agency said. But Gen. Nebojsa Pavkovic, the current army chief and longtime ally of former President Slobodan Milosevic, was not on the list.
WORLD
September 4, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Three military officers accused of ordering the slaying of a Guatemalan human rights activist went on trial in her stabbing death. Myrna Mack was stabbed 27 times outside her Guatemala City office Sept. 11, 1990. In 1993, Sgt. Noel de Jesus Beteta was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the killing. Three years later, Gen. Edgar Augusto Godoy and retired Cols.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the most baffling mysteries of the World War II era. How did convicted war criminal Hermann Goering manage to poison himself as U.S. soldiers prepared to hang him? A dozen competing theories have swirled for nearly half a century about how the onetime Nazi second in command was able to commit suicide despite around-the-clock surveillance of his military prison cell.
NEWS
September 17, 1985 | Associated Press
Four former top-echelon military officers, one a political party leader and former prime minister, were arrested today and charged with treason in a failed coup on Sept. 9. Police identified the four as Kriangsak Chomanand, a former supreme commander; his one-time deputy, Krasae Intharatna; Serm Nanakorn, another former armed forces supreme commander, and Yod Thephasadin, former deputy army commander in chief.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Maria Halkias
The first civilian to run the military's $10-billion-a-year retail business is working to bring the enterprise into the modern age. The CEO of the Dallas-based Army & Air Force Exchange Service, Tom Shull, is the first retailer to hold the post. It had been held by military officers on a two-year basis for 117 years. Shull, 61, was named to the position last year and his tenure doesn't have a time limit. There had been many complaints about the service in the comments section of Military Times.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Survivors of sexual assault in the military urged lawmakers to require independent review of claims, taking the final authority out of the hands of high-ranking officers who have in some cases reversed decisions by military juries. That, they testified in a Senate hearing Wednesday, is the best way to end widespread underreporting of sexual assaults in the military. In the first Senate examination of sexual assault in the military in nearly a decade, the Senate Armed Services subcommittee on personnel weighed a range of potential solutions to a long-standing problem that permeates every branch of the military.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
The news of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's death this week was striking not because it came as a surprise. Rather it was because his death ignited a bitter debate over what the populist leader's lasting legacy will be at home and abroad. To his supporters, Chavez was a force for good who made them a priority, who established government programs to combat poverty and illiteracy. But to his critics, he was little more than an old-style Latin American caudillo , or strongman, who mismanaged the country's vast oil wealth and allowed inflation and crime to spiral out of control.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - The case against six Mexican military officers accused of colluding with the Beltran Leyva drug cartel may be falling apart as federal prosecutors under new President Enrique Peña Nieto have reportedly admitted they lack sufficient evidence to back up the government's allegations. The prosecutors' statement to a federal judge presiding over the criminal case was included in court documents obtained by the newspaper Reforma and published Tuesday. A representative of the Mexican attorney general's office would not comment.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali, Washington Bureau
FT. MEADE, Md. - Pfc. Bradley Manning swiveled in the witness chair, smiling and occasionally talking over his lawyer. In his Army dress-blue uniform, he appeared even younger than his 24 years. It was difficult to reconcile the bespectacled Manning's relaxed, almost chatty demeanor with the vast charges against him - perpetrating one of the biggest leaks of classified material in U.S. history. Manning is accused of providing the anti-secrecy Internet group WikiLeaks with hundreds of thousands of U.S. diplomatic cables and classified war logs from Afghanistan and Iraq while based in Baghdad as a military intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Gen. William “Kip” Ward, who was found by investigators to have improperly spent thousands of dollars on lavish travel and other expenses, will retire as a three-star general, one step below the four-star rank he held when he was head of the U.S. Africa Command, according to a spokesperson for the Department of Defense. The decision to demote Ward was announced as official Washington is dealing with the resignation of retired Army Gen. David Petraeus as CIA director because of an extramarital affair.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A major and two lieutenants of the Liberian army were arrested in the besieged capital city of Monrovia and charged with the murder of 12 people, including a township mayor. Authorities said some of the bodies had been mutilated. Leftist guerrillas now control most of the country and have been threatening Monrovia.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwanese prosecutors charged a former navy commander in chief and eight other retired officers with corruption for their purported roles in multibillion-dollar arms scandals that have shaken the military. Prosecutors indicted six retired officers on corruption charges over the purchase of six French-made frigates in 1991, according to a copy of the indictment. Retired Adm.
WORLD
September 22, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Two former Turkish generals and a retired admiral were among more than 300 ex-officers sentenced to prison terms Friday in a controversial case that highlighted tensions between Turkey's civilian government and the long-powerful military. The three ex-commanders were convicted in Istanbul, Turkey, of being the ringleaders of a complex plot to "overthrow the government by force" almost a decade ago and were initially sentenced to life in prison, Turkish news reports said.
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