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WORLD
September 22, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Two former Turkish generals and a retired admiral were among more than 300 ex-officers sentenced to prison terms Friday in a controversial case that highlighted tensions between Turkey's civilian government and the long-powerful military. The three ex-commanders were convicted in Istanbul, Turkey, of being the ringleaders of a complex plot to "overthrow the government by force" almost a decade ago and were initially sentenced to life in prison, Turkish news reports said.
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NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - “Wow!” said Elaine Brye of Winona, Ohio. “What's a mom like me doing in a place like this?” Brye was not planning a turn on stage at the Democratic National Convention when she sat down last December to write a Christmas card to First Lady Michelle Obama. It was “just a mom-to-mom note to say thank you for caring,” Brye said Tuesday night as she introduced Obama. “The first lady not only read my letter, she invited my husband and I to the White House. It was an amazing experience.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- Rep. Paul Ryan went deep into military country Thursday to make the case that President Obama is threatening national security by presiding over huge planned cuts in defense spending -- cuts that Ryan himself helped create as a member of Congress. Speaking to an audience near Ft. Bragg dominated by military contractors, retired military officers and their families, Ryan insisted that he voted for the budget bill that resulted in the so-called sequester in 2011 despite strong objections over its planned cuts to the military.
WORLD
March 25, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman
The Egyptian military stamps itself as protector of the nation, but behind this carefully tended mythology the army controls a multibillion-dollar business empire that trades in products not normally associated with men in uniform: olive oil, fertilizer, televisions, laptops, cigarettes, mineral water, poultry, bread and underwear. Estimates suggest that military-connected enterprises account for 10% to 40% of the Egyptian economy. It is an opaque realm of foreign investments, inside deals and privilege that has grown quietly for decades, employing thousands of workers and operating parallel to the army's defense industries.
WORLD
February 25, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The spasm of violence that has shaken the country since copies of the Koran were dumped in a trash incinerator at a U.S. military base is emblematic of a culture war among Afghans themselves, one that is likely to grow more intense as the Western military presence wanes. Five days of chaotic street battles have left more than 30 people dead, including two U.S. military officers killed Saturday in a heavily guarded Afghan government ministry. The unrest over the desecration of the Muslim holy book illustrated not only the depth of religious fervor felt by many here, but also a visceral distaste for Western behavior and values among a far broader swath of Afghan society.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
Appearing in a military courtroom Friday for the first time, accused WikiLeaks source Army Pfc. Bradley Manning said he understood the charges against him in a criminal case that involves one of the largest leaks of classified material in U.S. history. The pretrial proceeding got bogged down in legal maneuvering when Manning's civilian lawyer, David Coombs, argued that the presiding military officer could not be impartial because he is also a federal prosecutor. Coombs said Army Reserve Lt. Col. Paul Almanza should step aside because he is the deputy chief prosecutor of the child exploitation and obscenity section of the criminal division of the Department of Justice.
WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A Chilean judge is seeking the extradition of a former U.S. military officer to face murder charges in the 1973 slaying of freelance journalist and filmmaker Charles Horman, a case dramatized in the Oscar-winning film "Missing," court sources confirmed Tuesday. Judge Jorge Zepeda wants former U.S. Navy Capt. Ray E. Davis, whose whereabouts were not immediately clear Tuesday, to face trial in Chile for his alleged involvement in the deaths of Horman and U.S. student Frank Teruggi.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
An American-born terrorist who carried out a deadly shooting in front of an Arkansas military recruiting station pleaded guilty to his crimes in an Arkansas courtroom Monday, earning a life sentence without parole and avoiding the death penalty. Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad, 26, a convert to Islam, had previously confessed to the 2009 crime, in which he drove to the recruiting office in Little Rock and fired numerous rounds, killing one Army soldier and wounding another. Police said he told them he did so to protest the U.S. military and "what they had done to Muslims in the past.
WORLD
June 10, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
In one of his last major addresses before his retirement this month, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday that NATO's sometimes shaky air campaign in Libya had "laid bare" the shortcomings of the alliance, which he said was facing "collective military irrelevance" after years of inadequate defense spending by most of its members. In March, the alliance unanimously backed the decision to go to war in Libya to protect civilians from forces loyal to Moammar Kadafi, but Gates noted that fewer than half of NATO's 28 members were participating in the military operation and fewer than a third are conducting airstrikes against ground targets.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration admitted defeat in its efforts to prosecute the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks before a civilian jury in New York City, announcing that Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four others would be tried by a military commission at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The decision, announced Monday by Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr., marks a sharp political setback for President Obama, who had repeatedly pledged to use civilian courts to try "high-value" terrorism suspects.
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