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WORLD
August 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Union leader Carlos Ortega escaped from a military prison where he was serving a sentence of nearly 16 years for rebellion, the attorney general said. Ortega, president of the Confederation of Venezuelan Workers, led a two-month general strike in 2002 that nearly shuttered the nation's vital oil industry in an effort to oust President Hugo Chavez.
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OPINION
May 7, 2013
Re "Obama's Gitmo woes," Opinion, May 5 As a fan of Doyle McManus, I was disappointed to read his claim that most of the detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay were anti-American extremists when they were apprehended. Our own government has acknowledged that many of these men were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time, near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border when the war started in 2001. They are guilty of nothing. I also note with dismay the remarks of Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.)
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NEWS
August 24, 1997 | LIBBY QUAID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The aging military prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., is crumbling around its inmates, prisoners allege in a lawsuit. Chunks of plaster have struck at least two inmates on the head, their lawyer, Denver attorney Alison Ruttenberg, said. And two of Leavenworth's commanding officers have warned of deteriorating conditions, according to Army memorandums obtained by the inmates.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Obaidullah, an Afghan villager captured with diagrams of improvised bombs, has marked nearly 11 years as a detainee at the U.S. naval base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Three months ago, outraged by what he called another prison "shakedown," he joined a hunger strike there, and now is locked in solitary confinement with at least 100 fellow detainees. "I have seen men who are on the verge of death being taken away to be force-fed," Obaidullah said in a federal court affidavit declassified Friday.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2013 | By David Cloud and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Confronted with a mass hunger strike and the use of forced feedings to keep inmates from starving, President Obama broke a long silence on the military prison for suspected foreign terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, declaring it "not sustainable" and making a strongly worded plea Tuesday for its closure. Guantanamo is "a problem that is not going to get better. It's going to get worse. It's going to fester," Obama said at a White House news conference in his most extensive comments on the issue in two years.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
If the U.S. captured Osama bin Laden or other senior Al Qaeda leaders, they would probably be imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, CIA Director Leon E. Panetta said in his first public acknowledgment that the controversial U.S. military prison in Cuba might be used to hold future detainees. Bin Laden and Al Qaeda's No. 2 leader, Ayman Zawahiri, both of whom are believed to be hiding in Pakistan, would probably be moved quickly to the U.S. air base at Bagram, Afghanistan, for questioning and eventually moved, "probably to Guantanamo," Panetta told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | MATT TRUELL, Associated Press
They call it The Castle, a massive stone building with eight wings radiating from a central six-story rotunda. The wings hold eight tiers of cells, stacked one upon the other, and in each 8-by-10-foot cell an inmate is allowed a cot, a table and a chair. The U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in Ft. Leavenworth is the biggest military prison in the nation. It is a grim home for about 1,450 inmates, sent here from bases all over the world, wherever American military men and women are stationed.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Haitian soldiers shot and stabbed to death 46 civilians in a military prison, according to a survivor of the massacre, the San Francisco Examiner reported today. In a taped interview, the 19-year-old woman said men in uniforms shot and bayoneted 46 people confined with her at the Ft. Dimanche military prison outside the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince over the weekend, the newspaper said.
OPINION
January 18, 2012 | By Kal Raustiala
Of all the hangovers from the George W. Bush years, the thorniest may be what to do about the U.S. military prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. There are still 171 detainees at Guantanamo and little consensus on what to do with them. Last spring, President Obama announced the resumption of military trials for some of those charged with participating in the 9/11 attacks. These trials, known as military commissions, have been stalled for years by legal challenges. Recently, the official in charge of the Guantanamo prison, Rear Adm. David Woods, issued a draft order that compounds these challenges.
WORLD
August 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown asked the United States to free five British residents from the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. U.S. officials said Brown's request was a positive step in broader efforts to cut the number of inmates at the controversial prison and eventually shut it. State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said any transfers would depend on assurances that the detainees would not be mistreated.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2013 | By David Cloud and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Confronted with a mass hunger strike and the use of forced feedings to keep inmates from starving, President Obama broke a long silence on the military prison for suspected foreign terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, declaring it "not sustainable" and making a strongly worded plea Tuesday for its closure. Guantanamo is "a problem that is not going to get better. It's going to get worse. It's going to fester," Obama said at a White House news conference in his most extensive comments on the issue in two years.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- A military judge refused Tuesday to dismiss the charges against the Army private accused of treason for providing reams of government secrets to WikiLeaks, saying numerous pretrial delays were necessary because of the “voluminous amount of classified information.” The ruling now clears the way for Pfc. Bradley Manning to appear in a military courtroom here Thursday and probably plead guilty to some of the lesser charges against...
NATIONAL
January 3, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The military judge overseeing the trial for alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four others has ruled that lawyers cannot make public even unclassified materials. The ruling by the judge, Army Col. James L. Pohl, follows an order on Dec. 6 in which he directed that any evidence or discussion about harsh interrogation techniques used against the five men also be kept secret. He issued the ruling despite accusations by human rights groups that the government was trying to hide the fact the men were tortured.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
Omar Ahmed Khadr, the youngest and last remaining Western prisoner at the Guantanamo Bay detention center for terrorism suspects, was sent home to his native Canada on Saturday after a decade at the U.S. military prison in southern Cuba. Human rights organizations that had fought for his release for years applauded the transfer, and renewed calls on the Obama administration to make good on the president's pledge to close the  interrogation and detention facilities that have provoked international condemnation since they opened in January 2002.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
The latest prisoner to die at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility for terrorism suspects was a young Yemeni imprisoned there for more than a decade despite a 2010 federal court order that he be freed and the military's judgment three years earlier that he could be safely released. Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif died at the Camp V maximum-security block of the U.S. military prison in southern Cuba on Saturday, Joint Task Force Guantanamo said in a statement Tuesday. The statement gave Latif's age as 32, although reports from other sources said his birth date was Dec. 27, 1975.
TRAVEL
March 12, 2012 | By Terry McDermott
Among the many reasons Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the man who planned the Sept. 11 attacks, should be tried in an American court of law, there is this: "I decapitated with my blessed right hand the head of the American Jew, Daniel Pearl, in the city of Karachi, Pakistan. For those who would like to confirm, there are pictures of me on the Internet holding his head. " The murder of Pearl, the Wall Street Journal's South Asia bureau chief, was but one of 31 attacks or planned attacks that Mohammed confessed to in front of an American military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay on March 10, 2007.
NEWS
August 4, 1987
Cmdr. Donal M. Billig, the Navy surgeon convicted of involuntary manslaughter and negligence in the deaths of three patients, has lost his first bid for parole and must remain behind bars for at least another year. Billig, the former chief heart surgeon at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, was sentenced March 3, 1986, to four years in prison after a court-martial. He is in the military prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.
OPINION
January 18, 2012 | By Kal Raustiala
Of all the hangovers from the George W. Bush years, the thorniest may be what to do about the U.S. military prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. There are still 171 detainees at Guantanamo and little consensus on what to do with them. Last spring, President Obama announced the resumption of military trials for some of those charged with participating in the 9/11 attacks. These trials, known as military commissions, have been stalled for years by legal challenges. Recently, the official in charge of the Guantanamo prison, Rear Adm. David Woods, issued a draft order that compounds these challenges.
OPINION
January 11, 2012 | By Joseph Margulies
"I have here in my hand a list of ... names. " When Sen. Joseph McCarthy told the Ohio County Women's Republican Club of Wheeling, W.Va., on Feb. 9, 1950, that he held a list of 205 communists employed by the State Department, he ignited a firestorm and launched a career. We now know there was no list. Even then, it was obvious McCarthy was not particularly punctilious about the numbers. In Wheeling it was 205; in Salt Lake City it was 57; on the Senate floor it was 81. Nor was he especially careful about the allegation.
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