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Military Sealift Command

WORLD
January 10, 2003 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
The Marine Corps issued an order barring virtually all Marines from leaving the service as the Air Force began sending dozens of fighters and bombers to the Persian Gulf in preparation for a potential war in Iraq, defense officials said Thursday. The surge in deployments and the Marines' freeze -- the first implemented service-wide since the 1991 war against Iraq -- capped a dramatic week of military preparations. The U.S.
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NATIONAL
October 5, 2005 | Ken Silverstein and Alan C. Miller, Times Staff Writers
The government's controversial agreement to lease three ships from Carnival Cruise Lines for emergency housing after Hurricane Katrina provided more benefits to the company than had previously been disclosed, according to contract documents obtained by The Times. But it also includes a clause -- inserted late last week at the company's request -- that calls for returning any excess profit.
OPINION
January 29, 2003 | James A. Lyons Jr.
From the earliest moments of the war against terrorism, President Bush has balanced the projection of military force with a matching deployment of humanitarian assistance. In these days of unconventional, shadowy warfare, humanitarian aid can be a cost-effective means of winning the hearts and minds of those living under terrorism's threat or tyranny's boot. In Afghanistan, the air campaign delivered food to a population close to starvation.
NEWS
September 3, 1990
About 550 Western and Japanese citizens held since Aug. 2 in Iraq and Kuwait began arriving in their home countries Sunday. Iraq's ambassador to the United States, Mohammed Mashat, was at the airport to greet the 47 Americans who landed at Washington's Dulles airport, but he disappeared quickly after one man on the flight blasted the Iraqi policy under which thousands of Westerners are still held. Other passengers on that flight revealed details of the dire situation in the U.S.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | GREG KRIKORIAN and JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In just 14 days, they accomplished something remarkable. Called to a crisis halfway around the world, several dozen ships moved the equivalent of a town of 50,000, plus all its vehicles, food, water and other supplies, from ports in the United States to the Persian Gulf. Over the months, they built U.S. troop strength there to 240,000.
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people of violence-torn East Timor have overwhelmingly voted to end 24 years of Indonesian rule and become an independent state, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Friday. The announcement, made simultaneously in Indonesia and at U.N. headquarters in New York, said 78.5% of the province's voters had opted for independence rather than autonomy within Indonesia in the U.N.-sponsored referendum held Monday under largely peaceful conditions.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tougher federal laws and heightened caution by oil shippers since the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster have dramatically reduced major oil spills and brought safer tankers into U.S. waters. The apparent trend--documented by industry experts and in several recent reports, including one released Friday--could mean a long-term reduction in the amount of oil spilled along the nation's sensitive coastlines.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. military has abandoned plans to rotate American troops serving in the desert of Saudi Arabia, which means that the 238,000 currently deployed there can expect to stay until the Persian Gulf crisis is over, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said Friday. President Bush's decision to build up the gulf force by more than another 200,000 troops brought an end to tentative Pentagon plans to start rotating units out after six months, beginning about the first of the year.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tougher federal laws and heightened caution by oil shippers since the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster have dramatically reduced major oil spills and brought safer tankers into U.S. waters. The apparent trend--documented by industry experts and in several recent reports, including one released Friday--could mean a long-term reduction in the amount of oil spilled along the nation's sensitive coastlines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2006 | Joel Rubin and Howard Blume, Times Staff Writers
The finalists for the job of Los Angeles schools chief include a retired Navy vice admiral and a former district insider who became a superintendent elsewhere, rounding out an eclectic mix of five candidates. Separately, a coalition led by school district officials filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging legislation giving Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa substantial authority over the Los Angeles Unified School District. One of the newly disclosed finalists for the superintendent post is David L.
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