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Military Ships

NEWS
November 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nine sailors were injured by smoke inhalation and four of them suffered burns in a fire Wednesday aboard the oiler Monongahela in the eastern Atlantic, the fifth incident this week involving Navy vessels. One civilian specialist on industrial hazards warned that cutbacks in Navy training could lead to more such accidents. "Congress is always trying to cut training budgets. But, if a pilot can't practice flying, those on the deck don't get trained either. . . .
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NEWS
February 26, 1991
Two Iraqi Silkworm missiles were fired at allied warships Monday, believed to be the first use of the large anti-ship missiles in the Gulf War. One was knocked out by British missiles and the other fell into the sea. The Silkworm is the Chinese version of the 30-year-old Soviet Styx, a relatively crude radar-guided missile. However, it is considered a potent naval threat. Launch: By ship or mobile launcher.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a defense spending blueprint that takes the first tentative steps toward a restructured military, President Bush on Monday proposed to cut troop levels, cancel numerous but relatively inexpensive weapons programs and close 55 mostly small military facilities, including 10 in California.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | Reuters
The hospital ship Mercy is in the Arabian Sea and by Wednesday will join its sister ship Comfort in the Persian Gulf, a U.S. Navy spokesman said Saturday. The 69,000-ton ships each have 1,000 beds, 12 operating theaters and up to 850 medical staff, the spokesman said.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If granted "testimonial immunity," the captain of the attack submarine Greeneville promised Thursday to persuasively refute assertions that he hastily ignored safety procedures in the moments before the sub's deadly collision with a Japanese fishing vessel. Through his attorney, Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle offered to provide a court of inquiry with details about the Feb. 9 accident that "no other witness is able to testify to." In a letter to Adm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
The battleship Iowa, scene of a horrific explosion that killed 47 sailors, and the battleship New Jersey, whose home port is Long Beach, top the Navy's "mothball" list in its plans to retire two of four battleships next year, Defense Department officials said Wednesday. The proposal to mothball two battleships, submitted to President Bush for the fiscal 1991 budget he will present to Congress on Jan. 29, would halve the number of the heavily armored World War II-era ships.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A predawn fire Tuesday killed one Navy officer and injured a dozen sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer Conyngham, which was left for hours without communications and dead in the water off the North Carolina coast. The blaze forced the captain to evacuate the bridge and the combat information center while the 380-man crew battled the main engine-room fire and a series of secondary fires. The dead officer was identified as Lt. A. Pope Gordon Jr., 34, of Virginia Beach, Va., son of a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a break from the nation's war on terrorism, Coast Guard officials and government dignitaries gathered Friday at Newport Harbor to commission the Narwhal, a state-of-the-art cutter that has been on constant patrol since Sept. 11. "The Coast Guard is on the front line as never before," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who spoke at the commissioning ceremony. "Your task is formidable. I want to thank the crew for its commitment to national security."
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resolving one of the great mysteries of its country's history, the Israeli navy confirmed Saturday that it has found the wreckage of the submarine Dakar, which vanished in 1968 with 69 sailors aboard. The submarine was discovered resting on the floor of the Mediterranean Sea between Cyprus and Crete, near its original route from Britain to Israel, at a depth of nearly 10,000 feet, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
A rusting, barnacle-encrusted World War II-era ship is available as a unique home for the homeless of Los Angeles County, Supervisor Deane Dana announced Tuesday. Dana said a Sacramento company has offered to sell, lease or operate a 328-foot barge--big enough for 400 people--if the county can find a place to anchor or berth it. City and county officials said that would not be easy.
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