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NEWS
June 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Don Beaulieu's homecoming fell a little short of a ticker-tape parade. He returned from the Persian Gulf War on a stretcher, his body in tatters. It took the U.S. military 12 days to get him to the right hospital. Then he learned that his left foot would have to be amputated. In late March, two days before the operation in an Augusta, Ga., medical center, the 26-year-old U.S. Army sergeant from rural Maine turned to his fiancee, Sandra Sapp. "Are you still going to marry me?" he asked her sadly.
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WORLD
November 1, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
U.S. and allied forces have failed to reduce the number of civilian fatalities caused by them in Afghanistan despite a two-year effort by American commanders, internal U.S. military statistics show. Civilian deaths have risen 11% from 144 at this time last year to 160 in 2010. The increase has coincided with the rising number of incidents in which U.S. and NATO attack helicopters mistakenly fired on Afghans who turned out to be civilians, the previously unreleased statistics show.
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NEWS
February 28, 1991
The strategy was launched Aug. 7, just five days after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. It was relentlessly executed through months of U.N. negotiation, six weeks of allied bombing and five days of lightning-fast ground war against experienced Iraqi forces that greatly outnumbered allied combat troops. While pockets of Iraqi resistance remain, the Iraqi army is effectively out of commission. Aug. 7, 1990-Jan.
WORLD
May 26, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military said Sunday that the number of attacks by militants in the last week dropped to a level not seen in Iraq since March 2004. About 300 violent incidents were recorded in the seven-day period that ended Friday, down from a weekly high of nearly 1,600 in mid-June last year, according to a chart provided by the military. The announcement appeared aimed at allaying fears that an uprising by militiamen loyal to radical Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr could unravel security gains since 28,500 additional American troops were deployed in Iraq in a buildup that reached its height in June.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American helicopters and jets hammered Iraqi tanks, trucks and armored personnel carriers in what one pilot described Tuesday as a "turkey shoot," and a senior U.S. military source said the month-old air campaign is inflicting "horrendous casualties" on Saddam Hussein's forces.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six U.S. helicopter crewmen were killed in two separate crashes, and three airmen were reported missing after their B-52 crashed into the Indian Ocean while returning from a bombing run over Iraq, U.S. military officials said Sunday. Also Sunday, Marine officials said seven of the 11 Leathernecks killed in a light armored vehicle last week and another Marine killed in a cluster-bomb attack Saturday were victims of so-called friendly fire.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
When Saddam Hussein's army invaded Kuwait last Aug. 2, it was among the largest in the world. By any of several measures, it was in the top 10. In the case of army size in proportion to population, Iraq was No. 1, according to a Times analysis. While the Iraqi army is now in ruins, it may be instructive to see where it stood, and which nations now move up the list. Size of Force in Proportion to Population Rank: Troops on active duty per 1,000 population 1. IRAQ: 53.0 2. Israel: 42.6 3.
NEWS
February 8, 1991
ALLIED SORTIES More than 52,000 missions flown. REPORTED BY THE ALLIES: 30 killed in action, including 12 Americans. 24 Americans listed as noncombat deaths. 43 missing in action, including 25 Americans. 12 prisoners of war, including eight Americans. 28 allied planes lost, 21 in combat. More than 885 Iraqis taken prisoner. 135 Iraqi planes destroyed.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
The Japanese Striking Force The Japanese carrier striking task force that attacked Pearl Harbor set sail from the Kuril Islands on Nov. 26. It was made up of six aircraft carriers, two battleships and had a support force of nine destroyers, one light cruiser, two heavy cruisers and eight tankers. Three I-class submarines were positioned in front of the task force to act as scouts. U.S. Ships That Missed the Attack Many ships of the U.S. fleet were not present at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call themselves "America's Army," and it fits, for they come from our workaday ranks. That guy who changes your car's oil might command a tank on weekends. Or maybe your boss trades her high heels and power suit once a month for military garb and a gun. But the weekend warriors of the National Guard are hurting. Faced with lean budgets in a post-Cold War world, the National Guard finds itself struggling along with the rest of the country's military monolith.
WORLD
September 10, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
In this besieged capital, it was a rare good-news story: Killings had plummeted by as much as 50% since U.S. and Iraqi forces hit the streets last month in a show of strength after the sectarian bloodbath of July. "We're actually seeing progress out there," Army Maj. Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, the chief military spokesman here, said when making the announcement. Not so fast.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2005 | Doyle McManus, Times Staff Writer
President Bush offered only a few pieces of specific evidence Sunday to support his assertion that "we are winning the war in Iraq." And like so much in Iraq, even those are hotly debated. The president said more than 126 Iraqi combat battalions were now engaged in "fighting the enemy" and "more than 50 are taking the lead." Those numbers are based on current Pentagon estimates of Iraqi troop strength, officials said. An Iraqi battalion includes about 600 men.
WORLD
October 30, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a rare look at how the Defense Department tracks non-U.S. casualties in the war in Iraq, the Pentagon has estimated that about 26,000 Iraqis were killed or wounded by insurgents between Jan. 1, 2004, and Sept. 16 of this year. The Pentagon, in response to questions from congressional staffers, provided daily casualty estimates -- those killed and wounded -- over six time periods, the most recent period ending Sept. 16.
WORLD
January 27, 2005 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
U.S. forces killed or captured about 15,000 suspected militants in Iraq last year, the top U.S. commander in the country said Wednesday, suggesting that the American military has underestimated the strength of the insurgency. The new figures seemed to show that previous estimates of an insurgent force of 6,000 to 9,000 fighters were inaccurate, Army Gen. George W. Casey said in a rare meeting with the U.S. media here.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2004 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military lacks sufficient personnel to meet the nation's current war and peacekeeping demands throughout the world in coming years, despite steps being taken by the Army to stretch its ranks and increase the number of soldiers available for combat, according to a Pentagon advisory board. The report by the Defense Science Board, a panel of outside advisors to Defense Secretary Donald H.
NEWS
June 21, 1999
A roundup of events as Yugoslavia completes its pullout from Kosovo: * Kosovo: The last of 40,000 Yugoslav troops roll out of the province. * Brussels: NATO declares an official end to the bombing campaign. * Serbia: Hundreds of Kosovo Serbs head back to province they fled days ago. * Kosovo: NATO signs demilitarization agreement with the Kosovo Liberation Army. Number of Serbs reported to have fled Kosovo: 50,000 Number said to have returned: several hundred
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
Body count. That's one of the more grisly aspects of the Vietnam War that the U.S. military can't seem to shed, no matter how hard it tries. Time after time, Gen. H.
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