Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMilitary Strategy
IN THE NEWS

Military Strategy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, American and South Korean military planners have studied what they sometimes call the Second Korean War. They have played out the war games and the scenarios aren't pretty. "The north's plan has two options to it," explains Paul Godwin of the Defense Department's National War College, an expert on Asian military affairs who has played the role of a North Korean in the war games. "One is to take Seoul quickly and sue for peace.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The Insurgents David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War Fred Kaplan Simon & Schuster: 400 pp, $28 Everyone knows - or thinks they know - about the influence exerted by the military-industrial complex on American foreign policy. But there is also a military-intellectual complex composed of think-tank researchers, policy theorists, academics, Pentagon bureaucrats, officers with PhDs, and even a few columnists and magazine writers. It was this complex that greatly influenced America's military strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 13, 1990
En route to Mediterranean: Aircraft carrier Saratoga, the battleship Wisconsin, one guided-missile cruiser and other support ships. Red Sea: Aircraft carrier Eisenhower, one guided-missile cruiser, one guided-missile destroyer and other support ships. Persian Gulf: The command ship LaSalle, two guided-missile cruisers, three guided-missile frigates and other U.S. Navy support ships. Also, one British destroyer and two French frigates.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- President Obama proclaimed the U.S. “exceptional” in the world as he paid tribute Wednesday to what he called the “finest, most capable military the world has ever known.” Speaking to graduates at the U.S. Air Force Academy here, Obama heralded the dawn of “another great American century” that he predicted will see recovery from tough economic times, new nation-building at home and an important role in...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1994
Let me see if I have this right. Certain military recruiters will overlook the fact that an applicant is not a United States citizen ("Mission Accomplished," Dec. 17). But if a lesbian or gay citizen wants to serve, she or he is not welcome. Great defense strategy, guys! RON WARD Los Angeles
NATIONAL
July 11, 2007 | Paul Richter and Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writers
As President Bush struggles to maintain support in Congress for his Iraq "surge" strategy, the three leading Republican presidential contenders have been quietly backing away from any commitment to continue the buildup. Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mitt Romney and Fred Thompson have made it clear that their original support for the escalation does not mean they are signed on to keeping the current 160,000 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1997
The Clinton administration's new review of defense policy outlines a military strategy and structure for the first decades of the 21st century that is disappointingly similar to the policy it is following in the last decade of the 20th century. The review continues the pretense that the United States has the ability to fight two major regional conflicts "nearly simultaneously." It reduces the armed forces and reserves slightly while maintaining defense spending at its current level.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea is preparing to voice high-level concern to the Clinton Administration about an emerging new American military strategy in which the United States, largely for budgetary reasons, would stand prepared to fight only one major war at a time, South Korean officials said Friday.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has prepared contingency plans for protecting Kuwait that call for using minimal American force to deter or repel an Iraqi invasion but stop short of equipping U.S. troops with the power to launch an offensive attack. The proposals, reflected in public statements recently by Defense Secretary William J. Perry and U.N. Ambassador Madeleine Albright, would rely mainly on American air strikes to break up Iraqi troop concentrations that appeared to threaten Kuwait. U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A young soldier in fatigues faces an NBC "Today" camera in the Saudi desert, smiling as he greets his fellow citizens in the United States. Click . In Illinois, just-activated reservists Capt. Priscilla Smith and Staff Sgt. Doug Martin are being interviewed on "CBS This Morning" about the call-up's impact on their families. In the case of Smith, whose husband is already serving in the Persian Gulf, the concern is who will now care for their three children? Click .
NATIONAL
January 5, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
Outlining new military priorities after a costly decade of war, President Obama called for shrinking the Army and Marines and refocusing Pentagon spending to counter dangers from China and Iran. Declaring that the "tide of war is receding," Obama outlined the shift in strategy in a rare appearance Thursday at the Pentagon, underscoring the White House desire to pivot away from the unpopular and costly conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan in an election year. In a sign of concern about China, and a new emphasis on the Asia Pacific region, the Navy is expected to keep its current fleet of 11 aircraft carriers and accompanying warships.
OPINION
November 21, 2011
Mexican President Felipe Calderon's most enduring legacy may well turn out to be the death toll from his country's bloody drug war. Since 2006, some 45,000 civilians have died, and the body count continues to rise. The homicide rate increased by more than 260% between 2007 and 2010. And a new report by Human Rights Watch indicates that drug cartels and organized crime aren't solely responsible for the bloodletting. The military, deployed to protect civilians, may have caused many of their deaths, according to the group's study.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2011 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
During the men's European runway shows this summer, I overheard a fashion editor describing a military history book he'd read. "The commanding officers in the British army at the time of the Crimean War were dandy aristocrats who were more concerned with one-upping each other with over-the-top uniforms and military regalia than they were with military strategy," he said. With the cardinal-red military jacket, blue sash and chest full of medals worn by Prince William during his April nuptials to Kate Middleton fresh in my mind, I was intrigued and inquired further.
OPINION
March 29, 2011
Before President Obama's address to the nation about Libya, three questions about U.S. involvement there loomed large: Why, among all the places with vulnerable civilian populations, did the U.S. and its allies choose to intervene in Libya? Was the mission designed to prevent civilian suffering or to topple Moammar Kadafi? How (and how quickly) would the U.S. extricate itself from this engagement? In his speech Monday, Obama addressed these thorny questions and many others with cogency and clarity, though not all of the answers were persuasive.
WORLD
December 16, 2010 | By David S. Cloud and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
A long-awaited White House review of the U.S. troop buildup in Afghanistan lays claim to progress in the fight against the Taliban insurgency, but it also acknowledges challenges to building a stable Afghan government and in eliminating militant sanctuaries in Pakistan. The review, released Thursday, says President Obama's military strategy is "setting the conditions" for a reduction of U.S. forces beginning in July 2011 and affirms the policy that Obama implemented just over a year ago. It suggests no changes to American troop levels in the region, according to an early summary released by the White House.
WORLD
April 19, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes, Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Iran unveiled what it described as a new air defense system during an annual military display Sunday as policymakers in Washington confronted new reminders about their limited range of options for responding to Tehran's apparent arms buildup. The new system, which Iran said is designed to defend against attacks by missiles and high-altitude planes, was introduced as the government awaits delivery of sophisticated missile defense batteries it has bought from Russia but which have been delayed because of Israeli pressure on Moscow.
WORLD
November 15, 2004 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
The United States' top military commanders converged here Sunday to craft a strategy for using the momentum from a seemingly successful anti-insurgent battle in Fallouja to pacify other embattled Iraqi cities, pressing toward a decisive "tipping point" in the war. In an unusually high-profile mid-battle gathering, Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, arrived from Washington, and Central Command chief Gen. John P. Abizaid flew in from his regional headquarters in Qatar.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath the 190-mile road that leads from Kuwait down Saudi Arabia's east coast is a pool of oil that many believe to be the richest in the world. But at ground level, in shimmering heat and a litter of abandoned cars, the scene for hundreds of miles is one of desolation. Camels lope alongside the road, and onto it, oblivious to the occasional car. Here and there in the distance, a bleached Bedouin tent rises out of the sand. Herds of long-haired black sheep stand in the unrelenting sun.
WORLD
December 28, 2009 | By Alex Rodriguez
As Pakistan forges ahead with its bid to uproot Taliban fighters from tribal areas along the border with Afghanistan, its troops are bypassing an enemy that the Obama administration desperately wants confronted. Rather than expand on its gains in South Waziristan and drive into North Waziristan to tackle the Haqqani network -- a wing of the Taliban that views U.S. and NATO-led troops in Afghanistan as its principal target -- the Pakistani military is now focusing its attention on driving Taliban militants from their strongholds in the surrounding tribal regions of Kurram, Orakzai and Khyber.
WORLD
December 16, 2009 | By Julian E. Barnes
The U.S. military command has quietly shifted and intensified the mission of clandestine special operations forces in Afghanistan, senior officials said, targeting key figures within the Taliban, rather than almost exclusively hunting Al Qaeda leaders. As a result of orders from Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the top U.S. and allied commander in Afghanistan, the special operations teams are focusing more on killing militants, capturing them or, whenever possible, persuading them to turn against the Taliban-led insurgency.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|