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Milk Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Much has been made of Sean Penn's performance in the extremely engaging "Milk," which follows the rise and tragic assassination of one of California's pioneering gay politicians, Harvey Milk. The subtle shift in Penn's voice, the change of its timbre, the ever so slight tilt of his head, the tension in his hand, the droop of his shoulder -- all of it fuses together to create a living, breathing, dimensional human on screen. But Penn takes it a step further, making the performance transcendent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
One day this thought won't matter. One day this thought won't be relevant. Today is not that day. Today, the fact that "Milk" received eight Oscar nominations from the academy, including best picture, is significant and says much about where we are in our relationship, and comfort level, with the gay rights movement. In a word -- improving. Why? Director Gus Van Sant's "Milk" is not a tentative film, rather it is openly, unapologetically gay.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When producer Zvi Howard Rosenman arrived at the recent academy screening of "Milk," he found someone occupying his reserved seat: Jack Nicholson. The actor ended up sitting right behind Rosenman. When the film was over, Nicholson leaned forward, tapped Rosenman on the shoulder and said, "Boy, oh, boy, you did a good job." Having produced dozens of films over the years -- including "The Main Event," "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Family Man" -- Rosenman is used to accepting accolades at movie premieres.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Much has been made of Sean Penn's performance in the extremely engaging "Milk," which follows the rise and tragic assassination of one of California's pioneering gay politicians, Harvey Milk. The subtle shift in Penn's voice, the change of its timbre, the ever so slight tilt of his head, the tension in his hand, the droop of his shoulder -- all of it fuses together to create a living, breathing, dimensional human on screen. But Penn takes it a step further, making the performance transcendent.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2008 | Claudia Eller, Eller is a Times staff writer.
If you thought marketing a film about the forbidden love of two cowboys had some challenges, how about one about a gay political activist? Focus Features, the specialty film division of Universal Pictures, is no stranger to selling movies that touch a nerve with the public. In 2005, it successfully steered "Brokeback Mountain," a drama about two Wyoming ranch hands who fell in love that pundits said would never find a wide audience, into a hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
One day this thought won't matter. One day this thought won't be relevant. Today is not that day. Today, the fact that "Milk" received eight Oscar nominations from the academy, including best picture, is significant and says much about where we are in our relationship, and comfort level, with the gay rights movement. In a word -- improving. Why? Director Gus Van Sant's "Milk" is not a tentative film, rather it is openly, unapologetically gay.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | Cristy Lytal, Lytal is a freelance writer.
For Cleve Jones, gay rights activist, initiator of the AIDS Memorial Quilt and historical consultant on director Gus Van Sant's new drama, "Milk," a chance meeting on the streets of San Francisco more than 30 years ago changed the course of his entire life. "Everything that I've done, everything I've accomplished, everything I survived, so much of it really just goes back to meeting Harvey Milk on the corner of Castro and 18th," said Jones. "I think of that every day."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | JAMES SCARBOROUGH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps it was intentional, perhaps not. But two photos thathang on the wall of the beauty parlor in the Cypress Civic Theatre Guild's production of "Steel Magnolias" use hairstyle models who resemble Daryl Hannah and Julia Roberts, stars of the 1989 movie of Robert Harling's tear-jerker. While use of those pictures might make it look as if the Cypress troupe intended to milk the movie's success, nothing could be further from the truth about a production that draws on far more modest resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2012 | Nicole Santa Cruz
As cities and schools across California celebrated the 82nd birthday of slain gay rights activist Harvey Milk, Orange County elected leaders remained steadfastly silent. Activists, for the second year, asked Orange County supervisors Tuesday to recognize Milk's birthday with a proclamation, but the board declined the opportunity, as it did last year. One of the supervisors, Janet Nguyen, walked from the board room shortly after the activists began their presentation. Last year, Nguyen also left the meeting as the activists spoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2012 | Kurt Streeter
The cafe is narrow, with a dozen little tables and a gray concrete floor. Nothing too fancy. Nothing too shiny. No espresso poured into designer porcelain with a dusting of organic cacao and a layer of orange-infused, textured milk. No movie stars. Or hardly ever. But Kaldi Coffee & Tea is home to a community of dreamers who share a singular ambition: They want to be part of the movies. Since the silent film era, people have flocked to L.A., seeking stardom. Hollywood may change, but the calculus remains the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | Cristy Lytal, Lytal is a freelance writer.
For Cleve Jones, gay rights activist, initiator of the AIDS Memorial Quilt and historical consultant on director Gus Van Sant's new drama, "Milk," a chance meeting on the streets of San Francisco more than 30 years ago changed the course of his entire life. "Everything that I've done, everything I've accomplished, everything I survived, so much of it really just goes back to meeting Harvey Milk on the corner of Castro and 18th," said Jones. "I think of that every day."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When producer Zvi Howard Rosenman arrived at the recent academy screening of "Milk," he found someone occupying his reserved seat: Jack Nicholson. The actor ended up sitting right behind Rosenman. When the film was over, Nicholson leaned forward, tapped Rosenman on the shoulder and said, "Boy, oh, boy, you did a good job." Having produced dozens of films over the years -- including "The Main Event," "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Family Man" -- Rosenman is used to accepting accolades at movie premieres.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2008 | Claudia Eller, Eller is a Times staff writer.
If you thought marketing a film about the forbidden love of two cowboys had some challenges, how about one about a gay political activist? Focus Features, the specialty film division of Universal Pictures, is no stranger to selling movies that touch a nerve with the public. In 2005, it successfully steered "Brokeback Mountain," a drama about two Wyoming ranch hands who fell in love that pundits said would never find a wide audience, into a hit.
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