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Milky Way Galaxy

NEWS
January 6, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Rapidly rotating red giant stars and a faint infrared glow have been discovered near the center of the Milky Way, supporting the hypothesis that an exotic black hole may lurk deep inside Earth's otherwise undistinguished home galaxy, scientists said Tuesday. After two decades of studying intense radio-wave emissions from a mysterious object called Sagittarius-A-Star, scientists had suspected it was a black hole.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 30,000 light-years from the center of the Milky Way, a cosmic message jolted Gwen Bell from bed: The Ulsa Minor and Sculptor galaxies are repelling each other. Realizing that she had drawn her vectors wrong, Bell flipped on her computer and began to finally make some headway on the problem that had stumped her for weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
Large balls of gas--failed stars that glow faintly like dying embers--are a newly discovered class of stellar objects and may be the most common bodies in the Milky Way, Caltech astronomers reported Tuesday at a San Diego meeting of the American Astronomical Society. They call the new objects "L" dwarfs and said their discovery will force revision of a century-old system of classifying stars based on chemistry and temperature. J.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
From Earth, the Milky Way is a band of stars that lights up the night sky. From outside the galaxy looking in, astronomers say, it's an entirely different picture. Astronomers say a bar of stars cuts through the center of the galaxy that includes the sun and Earth. "We're pretty certain of the extent and orientation of this bar because we got more data than anybody else ... by a long shot," said Edward G.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC San Diego scientists have discovered a second huge source of gamma rays in the Milky Way, a black hole or a neutron star that is generating enough radiation to power 50,000 suns. Reporting to the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, research physicist Michael S. Briggs said the object is about 1,800 light-years away from Earth. This is much closer than the so-called "Great Annihilator," the gamma ray source that is believed to be a black hole near the center of the galaxy.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An astronomer has found "irrefutable evidence" of at least two planets orbiting a nearby star--the first confirmed observation of planets outside the solar system humanity calls home. What has scientists most excited, however, is that the finding suggests that planets can form around almost any star and that the galaxy may well be crowded with planets.
SCIENCE
October 15, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dozens of massive stars, destined for short but brilliant lives, were born less than a light-year from the Milky Way's central black hole, one of the most hostile environments in our galaxy, astronomers reported Thursday. Researchers using the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and other instruments believe there is a safe zone around black holes, a big dust ring where stars can form.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Astronomers studying photographs of the sky said Monday that the Milky Way apparently is shrouded by enough invisible "dark matter" to make Earth's home galaxy five to 10 times larger and heavier than once thought. UC Santa Cruz astronomer Douglas N.C. Lin said the Milky Way is so massive that it is swallowing up the smaller, neighboring galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud.
SCIENCE
January 7, 2003 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
Snapping the most detailed images yet of the center of the Milky Way, astronomers have captured their first glimpses of the day-to-day life of the monstrous black hole residing at our galaxy's core. They reveal a temperamental and somewhat wimpy beast that appears to be starving. Black holes -- space and time twisters that personify the extremes of physics -- are among the most mysterious objects in the universe. Our neighborhood black hole is no exception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new study of some of the Milky Way's oldest stars deepens the riddle of the age of the universe. The study suggests that the stars are at least 9.5 billion years old, meaning that our galaxy and indeed the universe cannot be any younger than that. Some estimates of how the cosmos has expanded since the "big bang" suggest that the universe was created as recently as 8 billion years ago.
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