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Millie

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Marjorie Flathers
"Choose one, Millie!" her brother Jason demanded. "Come on. If we're going to play Monopoly, you've got to make up your mind." But there were too many choices. The thimble was cute, but it was so ordinary. She liked the little car, but Jason had that. She put the top hat on the Monopoly board, but it toppled over. That wouldn't do. It was always this way. Millie just couldn't make up her mind. Earlier that morning, she hadn't been able to decide whether the red shorts or the blue looked better.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - "Even if you're little, you can do a lot" sings the spirited 5-year-old heroine of "Matilda, the Musical," the Broadway hit adapted from the children's classic by Roald Dahl. The lyrics are a message of self-empowerment for Matilda, a Dostoyevsky-reading prodigy neglected by her dim-witted, vulgar parents. For the four young actresses who share the role onstage, the words are a mantra for making it through the frenzied run-up to Sunday night's Tony Awards, where "Matilda" is nominated in 12 categories.
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NEWS
September 11, 2003
Mr. Brownfield, I can't believe you left Millie's out of your breakfast A-list! ("L.A. Breakfast Place Haiku," Sept. 4) Waiters who look like Aged rocker space cadets. And the "Devil's Mess." Millie's, 3524 W. Sunset Blvd., Silver Lake, (323) 664-0404 Robert Helfman Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Strutting the stage in her white tuxedo jacket, shorts and sparkling top hat, Taylor Swift opened Sunday's Grammy Awards with a live performance of her current hit, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together. " Inside Staples Center, the singer's performance earned loud applause. But to the Twitterverse watching at home, the pop and country superstar sang a little bit flat. Swift was dancing in the footsteps of countless artists who have performed live at music's biggest night.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
You can criticize his arms control plans, oppose his flag burning amendment or even argue in favor of higher taxes, but don't mess with the President's dog. "I know you guys don't write the editorials, but our dog was named ugliest dog in Washington by the Washingtonian magazine," President Bush told three reporters from The Times at the end of an Oval Office interview Wednesday, referring to Millie, the family's springer spaniel. "I'd like some defense on the West Coast. "Imagine picking on a guy's dog."
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
"The Washingtonian" magazine Friday said it was sorry it called the presidential pet the ugliest canine in the capital. "Before you go away for the July 4th weekend, we would like to apologize for picking Millie the ugliest dog in Washington," Editor John A. Limpert said in a letter delivered Friday to the White House. He also sent a gift of dog biscuits to the offended beast. "You'll be pleased to know that our mail and phone calls are running about 99 to 1 in favor of Millie," he said.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
When I finished reading the column, I thought, "I wonder if Wanda Coleman knows that she's a racist?" MILLIE DE ROSE San Fernando
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | From United Press International
Barbara Bush had a news flash aboard Air Force One en route to China from Japan: Millie, her Springer spaniel, is expecting puppies between March 15 and March 20. "I'm a nervous wreck," she told reporters Saturday. She said she plans to take Millie to the veterinarian next week to discuss "home delivery" in the White House. "You know where she sleeps," she added with some trepidation. (Millie sleeps in the same bed with the Bushes.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Despite having been stripped of much of his holdings after World War II, Japan's late Emperor Hirohito has left his family $15.4 million in stocks and savings accounts, according to news reports. Hirohito never wrote a will, but his aides have come up with a plan to divide his estate between his widow, the Empress Dowager Nagako, and his eldest son and the new emperor, Akihito, according to the reports. Hirohito's estate would have been worth billions more if reforms imposed on Japan after the war by Allied occupation authorities had not forced him to relinquish holdings, including the Imperial Palace and several imperial villas, to the state.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | ANN CONNORS
The new U.S. ambassador to Italy, a man whose word choices have not always been the most choice, had the lingo down, however, when, with a preemptive gesture, he introduced his wife, two sons and a daughter as la famiglia to the Italian press on his arrival in Rome. Peter Secchia, dubbed the "ambassador of dirty words" by Italian journalists, had his nomination held up for a month in the Senate in a dispute over his qualifications, including concern about his tendency to make vulgar remarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court on Thursday overturned the littering conviction of an Arizona activist who left gallon-size bottles of water for illegal immigrants crossing into the United States through a desert wildlife preserve. Daniel Millis of NoMoreDeaths.org had been convicted of violating a statute prohibiting the dumping of garbage in an area designated as a refuge for endangered species. In a 2-1 ruling, judges of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said water didn't meet the definition of waste.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Marjorie Flathers
"Choose one, Millie!" her brother Jason demanded. "Come on. If we're going to play Monopoly, you've got to make up your mind." But there were too many choices. The thimble was cute, but it was so ordinary. She liked the little car, but Jason had that. She put the top hat on the Monopoly board, but it toppled over. That wouldn't do. It was always this way. Millie just couldn't make up her mind. Earlier that morning, she hadn't been able to decide whether the red shorts or the blue looked better.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2009 | Susan King
Anne Frank put a human face on the horrors of the Holocaust, thanks to the gift of an autograph book she received for her 13th birthday on June 12, 1942. It was just a month before her Jewish family went into hiding from the Nazis in rooms in her father Otto Frank's office building. Until they were betrayed to the Nazis, arrested and sent to concentration camps in 1944, Anne Frank skillfully wrote, in the red-and-green-plaid cloth book with a small lock, about her life in the attic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Christina Talcott, The Washington Post
For a woman who describes herself as a character actor, Emily Watson's role in the new "Miss Potter" is a character, to be sure. The indie-queen actress -- who was nominated for Oscars in 1997 for Lars von Trier's "Breaking the Waves" and in 1999 for "Hilary and Jackie" -- plays the fiery, impulsive Millie Warne, a bright neon sign in the gaslight salons of Victorian London, where the unmarried woman finds a friend in author Beatrix Potter.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2005 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
It was in a spartan office in Santa Cruz that Kenny Swain met Grandma Millie -- and where a little Washington utility drew first blood in its feud with Enron Corp. Swain was on a squad of unlikely detectives that included a retired teacher, a high-tech entrepreneur, an anthropologist and a recent political science grad. Swain himself was a former employee of an organic farming group. Their task: to search more than 2,000 hours of recorded conversations between Enron energy traders.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2004 | James C. Taylor, Special to The Times
When it opened in New York two years ago, a combination of timing and casting made "Thoroughly Modern Millie" an unlikely Broadway hit. The city was reeling from the events of the previous September, and instead of spurning a musical based on a 35-year-old Julie Andrews movie, weary theatergoers welcomed it as a bright, optimistic show about making it in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
William Inge always intended "Picnic" as a play for the ages. Nabbing the Pulitzer was a good start, and it put Inge--for a short time--on top of the world. But in one of the quirks that makes American pop culture endlessly trashy and wonderful, "Picnic" will probably stand throughout time as the moment when male actors became beefcake hunks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
I thought nothing could top February's Club Make-Up anniversary bash--which gave the Hollywood scene a well-needed dose of electric-eclectic shock rock therapy. But to call Saturday's tribute to "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" off the hook would be to sell it short. It was out of this world. The El Rey Theatre, where Club Make-Up is housed each month, was sold-out by 10 p.m. The line curled down Wilshire Boulevard farther than I've ever seen it go.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2004 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Spot, the first family's 14-year-old dog, was euthanized after suffering a series of strokes, the White House said Saturday. "The president and Mrs. Bush and the entire Bush family are deeply saddened by the passing of Spot," a White House statement said. "A loyal and loving companion, Spot was a beloved member of the Bush family for nearly 15 years. She will be missed." Born at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
SPORTS
October 9, 2003 | STEVE SPRINGER, Times Staff Writer
Question: Have you watched a tape of the fight? Answer: I've watched it. What can you do? Q: Did the tape bear out your initial conviction that you won? A: I was pleased and actually surprised by what I saw. I thought I did even better than I had thought that night. I was keeping Mosley at bay and landing good punches. He came forward later in the fight because he knew he was behind, knew he was losing. But I used long punches to win rounds. The strategy was always to lure him in.
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