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Million Man March

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995
I think that many Americans are growing tired of the inference of one group of people always being victimized by another group, or that government is guilty of never doing enough to bridge the racial divide. Nowhere in The Times' editorial ("Action, Not Study, on Racism," Oct. 19) is any reference made to individuals and their communities assuming a greater responsibility in ridding themselves of drug abuse, gangs and guns, and an extremely high out-of-wedlock birthrate, which all lead to greater economic stagnation.
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NEWS
October 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and D'JAMILA SALEM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's capital stepped aside Monday as the "Million Man March" came through. The Senate and the House closed. Many government workers took the day off, leaving agencies shorthanded. And the U.S. Postal Service and private delivery companies changed their schedules because of the impact of the marchers. At college and high school campuses, many students were absent from classes--as were some teachers, both African Americans and other races as well.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Joe Markman
A sea of angry taxpayers marched on the Capitol on Saturday afternoon. That much is certain. But even before the march was over, the news media, bloggers and rally supporters were wrangling over the crowd count, with estimates ranging from 60,000 to 2 million. The Daily Mail in England initially reported that 1 million people flooded the west lawn of the Capitol, protesting what they called the dangerous big government policies of President Obama. Some conservative blogs claimed 2 million attendees.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After rallying in Washington to change destructive attitudes and behavior in the black community, an army of African American men are returning to their homes across the country to face the challenge of giving concrete meaning to their historic day of atonement. But how do they do that? The answer, judging from the comments and reactions of many who attended Monday's "Million Man March," is not simple.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
After months of mobilizing and fund-raising, throngs of women plan to pour into Philadelphia for a "Million Woman March" and daylong rally that they hope will revitalize black families and communities. Organizers told city officials that they expect 500,000, but the organizers hope a million-plus will join the two-mile march Oct. 25 that will begin at Independence Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan has called on black men to march in Washington Oct. 16 as a day of atonement and reconciliation. Though women were not invited to the march itself, many are helping to organize it. All blacks were asked to stay away from school, work, and entertainment to mark the day. Many Protestant ministers and African American social, political and professional organizations have endorsed the effort.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After rallying in Washington to change destructive attitudes and behavior in the black community, an army of African American men are returning to their homes across the country to face the challenge of giving concrete meaning to their historic day of atonement. But how do they do that? The answer, judging from the comments and reactions of many who attended Monday's "Million Man March," is not simple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed "Million Woman March" inspired by the "Million Man March" in Washington last fall will not take place this month in Los Angeles, after the Los Angeles Police Commission's denial Tuesday of a permit for the event.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As thousands of buses carrying African American men converged on the nation's capital Sunday, supporters and critics of the "Million Man March" agreed that it will sharpen racial feelings--for better or for worse--across the country. Coming on the heels of the O.J. Simpson verdicts and other racially polarizing events, the march has simultaneously raised hopes and fears about what it will accomplish after the participants have gone home.
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