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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998
I read with interest the letter by James Buchanan of Orange regarding "Designation Is Not Quite Historic" (Aug. 9). Unfortunately, Buchanan has been misinformed about the Old Towne Historic District as it relates to the Mills Act availability. Not all buildings within the Historic District qualify for Mills Act property tax relief. The building must be a "contributing" house to the State and Federal Registers. Simply, any building built after 1940 is not eligible. The moneys not contributed to the tax assessor must be accounted for in the preservation of the building, so I do not consider it newfound wealth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Most of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County are failing to adequately protect historically important structures that are in danger of being razed, according to a new study by the Los Angeles Conservancy. A “preservation report card” assigns an “F” to 51 cities and all of the county's unincorporated communities -- - some that made no effort to save their historic places since the group's last county-wide assessment was completed six years ago. Conservancy leaders said some newer communities incorrectly believe they have no historic resources, and officials of other communities have delayed creating historic preservation programs because of budget cuts tied to the recession.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | DEBRA CANO and JOHN POPE
Officials will discuss the city's recently adopted Mills Act Program at a community meeting Saturday. The Mills Act is state legislation that allows for a reduction in property taxes for owners of historic properties, if the owners agree to maintain and preserve the property for at least 10 years. The program is available to owners of certain residential properties, officials said.
OPINION
August 15, 2011
Maybe it should come as no surprise that Beverly Hills — notorious for its outsized, sometimes gaudy homes — does not have an ordinance to protect architecturally significant structures. But that appears to be changing. Prompted by a public outcry over the expected demolition of the iconic Kronish House designed by Modernist architect Richard Neutra, the Beverly Hills City Council has ordered its planning commission to craft a preservation ordinance that would offer some protection for historically important buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1998 | Lesley Wright, (714) 966-7824
The first seven Old Towne residents to seek tax cuts in exchange for historic preservation efforts may get their contracts approved today. The state's Mills Act, which allows the exchange, was passed in 1972 as a way of preserving more of California's historical buildings. The City Council, which oversees the state's largest historic district, drafted a pilot Mills Act program in August and limited the number of participants to 10. They will vote on approving the first contracts today at 4:30 p.
REAL ESTATE
September 20, 1992 | EVELYN DE WOLFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Weise and Cynthia Yehle of La Verne went looking for a low-interest home-improvement loan to repair their leaky roof. What they found, instead, was a way to cut their annual property tax bill by 50%. How they did it may be the best-kept secret in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a fire burst through the floor of Fred Gillett's turn-of-the-century Victorian house last year, he knew it would take more than a trip to Home Depot to repair it. Restoring the three-story structure to its original 1887 specifications would cost $15,000, but Gillett knew that doing anything less would harm the integrity of the Old Towne Orange neighborhood where he lives. But he might soon be getting some financial help from an unexpected place: City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Most of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County are failing to adequately protect historically important structures that are in danger of being razed, according to a new study by the Los Angeles Conservancy. A “preservation report card” assigns an “F” to 51 cities and all of the county's unincorporated communities -- - some that made no effort to save their historic places since the group's last county-wide assessment was completed six years ago. Conservancy leaders said some newer communities incorrectly believe they have no historic resources, and officials of other communities have delayed creating historic preservation programs because of budget cuts tied to the recession.
OPINION
August 15, 2011
Maybe it should come as no surprise that Beverly Hills — notorious for its outsized, sometimes gaudy homes — does not have an ordinance to protect architecturally significant structures. But that appears to be changing. Prompted by a public outcry over the expected demolition of the iconic Kronish House designed by Modernist architect Richard Neutra, the Beverly Hills City Council has ordered its planning commission to craft a preservation ordinance that would offer some protection for historically important buildings.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | Scott Marshutz
After Diana and Stuart Livingstone bought this two-story brick Italianate estate home in Old Towne Orange from a Catholic missionary in 1987, they realized they had stretched themselves to the brink of financial disaster. The timing couldn't have been worse: The stock market crashed that year, and Diana found out she was pregnant with the couple's second child shortly after they opened escrow. To recoup some cash, they rented the property out for two years before beginning the monumental task of updating the house, which was built in 1923 by Dr. Arthur Domann, one of the city's early physicians.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | Scott Marshutz
After Diana and Stuart Livingstone bought this two-story brick Italianate estate home in Old Towne Orange from a Catholic missionary in 1987, they realized they had stretched themselves to the brink of financial disaster. The timing couldn't have been worse: The stock market crashed that year, and Diana found out she was pregnant with the couple's second child shortly after they opened escrow. To recoup some cash, they rented the property out for two years before beginning the monumental task of updating the house, which was built in 1923 by Dr. Arthur Domann, one of the city's early physicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1998 | Lesley Wright, (714) 966-7824
The first seven Old Towne residents to seek tax cuts in exchange for historic preservation efforts may get their contracts approved today. The state's Mills Act, which allows the exchange, was passed in 1972 as a way of preserving more of California's historical buildings. The City Council, which oversees the state's largest historic district, drafted a pilot Mills Act program in August and limited the number of participants to 10. They will vote on approving the first contracts today at 4:30 p.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998
I read with interest the letter by James Buchanan of Orange regarding "Designation Is Not Quite Historic" (Aug. 9). Unfortunately, Buchanan has been misinformed about the Old Towne Historic District as it relates to the Mills Act availability. Not all buildings within the Historic District qualify for Mills Act property tax relief. The building must be a "contributing" house to the State and Federal Registers. Simply, any building built after 1940 is not eligible. The moneys not contributed to the tax assessor must be accounted for in the preservation of the building, so I do not consider it newfound wealth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a fire burst through the floor of Fred Gillett's turn-of-the-century Victorian house last year, he knew it would take more than a trip to Home Depot to repair it. Restoring the three-story structure to its original 1887 specifications would cost $15,000, but Gillett knew that doing anything less would harm the integrity of the Old Towne Orange neighborhood where he lives. But he might soon be getting some financial help from an unexpected place: City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | DEBRA CANO and JOHN POPE
Officials will discuss the city's recently adopted Mills Act Program at a community meeting Saturday. The Mills Act is state legislation that allows for a reduction in property taxes for owners of historic properties, if the owners agree to maintain and preserve the property for at least 10 years. The program is available to owners of certain residential properties, officials said.
REAL ESTATE
September 20, 1992 | EVELYN DE WOLFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Weise and Cynthia Yehle of La Verne went looking for a low-interest home-improvement loan to repair their leaky roof. What they found, instead, was a way to cut their annual property tax bill by 50%. How they did it may be the best-kept secret in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997 | J.J. POPE
Owners of historic properties who wish to receive a tax break will pay a fee to join the program under a resolution recently adopted by the City Council. The $500 fee for the city's new Mills Act program will help to pay for the staff, officials said. The state Mills Act allows for reduced property taxes on a historic building if the owner agrees to maintain and preserve the property for at least 10 years.
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