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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milt Hinton, a jazz bassist known for a big, rich tone and an unerring sense of rhythmic timing, and who also utilized a flair for photography to capture his colleagues at work throughout his 70-year career, died Tuesday at a hospital in New York's Queens after a long illness. He was 90.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milt Hinton, a jazz bassist known for a big, rich tone and an unerring sense of rhythmic timing, and who also utilized a flair for photography to capture his colleagues at work throughout his 70-year career, died Tuesday at a hospital in New York's Queens after a long illness. He was 90.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking literally, Friday night's festivities at the outdoor amphitheatre of the Hyatt Newporter Resort, where bass ace Milt Hinton was spotlighted, should have been called "A Tribute to Duke Ellington," not "A Tribute to Jimmy Blanton." Most of the Ellington tunes performed in the two-set concert weren't songs that Blanton--the seminal bass figure who was with Ellington's orchestra just two years (1939-41) and died of tuberculosis in 1942 at age 23--recorded or played with the maestro.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking literally, Friday night's festivities at the outdoor amphitheatre of the Hyatt Newporter Resort, where bass ace Milt Hinton was spotlighted, should have been called "A Tribute to Duke Ellington," not "A Tribute to Jimmy Blanton." Most of the Ellington tunes performed in the two-set concert weren't songs that Blanton--the seminal bass figure who was with Ellington's orchestra just two years (1939-41) and died of tuberculosis in 1942 at age 23--recorded or played with the maestro.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
**** Milt Hinton, "Old Man Time," Chiaroscuro Records. This two-CD package is virtually an aural autobiography as the bassist, now 80, surrounds himself with many peers, friends and former colleagues in a loving tribute. In tapings from various sessions, Hinton plays, sings and raps with Doc Cheatham, Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Cab Calloway, Lionel Hampton and Danny Barker. The notes are unique: hosannas from 57 other bass players.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The extent to which a musician's life can mirror the evolution of society in 20th-Century America has never been more graphically illustrated than in "Bass Lines: The Stories and Photographs of Milt Hinton" (Temple University Press: $39.95, 328 pages). His family links go back to antebellum days (his mother's mother was a slave on a Vicksburg plantation) and to Africa (his father came here with a missionary group from Monrovia).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Milt Hinton likes to quip that he's "the oldest bass player standing." While no doubt you could find an active bassist a few years older than Hinton, who's 81, you won't find one who can match his combination of celebrity and longevity. Hinton, a native of Vicksburg, Miss.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
"You simply have to go to the Otter Crest party. The music is different, and the setting is idyllic." When one has heard endorsements along these lines from jazzman after jazzman, it eventually becomes embarrassing not to act on their recommendation. As it turned out, the Otter Crest Jazz Weekend was everything that had been promised. The Inn at Otter Crest, a resort hotel six miles north of Newport and 50 miles northwest of Eugene, is a rambling collection of timbered buildings clinging to the hilly shoreline, surrounded on three sides by hundreds of pine and fir trees, on the fourth by the Pacific Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1988
More than 225 jazz and classical bassists are due in Los Angeles this week for the opening of the L.A. '88 Music Festival, a cornucopia of concerts, competitions and seminars being held today through Saturday at UCLA. The fourth biannual convention of the International Society of Bassists will feature performances by leading bass players, including the Paris Opera's controversial avant-garde musician, Francois Rabbath, and Milt Hinton, who has been a top-flight jazz bassist since the Swing Era.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
**** RICKY FORD "Manhattan Blues", Candid Tenorman Ford, a veteran of bands led by Charles Mingus and Mercer Ellington, displays his enterprising manner of combining modern and traditional values into a very appealing style. His big, rollicking sound and fleet improvisations make him sound like Ben Webster and Sonny Rollins rolled up in one.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Milt Hinton likes to quip that he's "the oldest bass player standing." While no doubt you could find an active bassist a few years older than Hinton, who's 81, you won't find one who can match his combination of celebrity and longevity. Hinton, a native of Vicksburg, Miss.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
**** Milt Hinton, "Old Man Time," Chiaroscuro Records. This two-CD package is virtually an aural autobiography as the bassist, now 80, surrounds himself with many peers, friends and former colleagues in a loving tribute. In tapings from various sessions, Hinton plays, sings and raps with Doc Cheatham, Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Cab Calloway, Lionel Hampton and Danny Barker. The notes are unique: hosannas from 57 other bass players.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The extent to which a musician's life can mirror the evolution of society in 20th-Century America has never been more graphically illustrated than in "Bass Lines: The Stories and Photographs of Milt Hinton" (Temple University Press: $39.95, 328 pages). His family links go back to antebellum days (his mother's mother was a slave on a Vicksburg plantation) and to Africa (his father came here with a missionary group from Monrovia).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Hard-swinging, baby-faced organist Joey De Francesco has been saddled on half the tracks of this new release with a completely unnecessary big band. Despite the presence of such names as Wallace Roney, Milt Hinton, Jerome Richardson and Warren Covington in the large ensemble, De Francesco sounds best on the pieces in which his Jimmy Smith-styled licks have a chance to establish some momentum.
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