Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMimicry
IN THE NEWS

Mimicry

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
April 18, 1993
There is no question--TV does teach. The problem lies in regulating what it teaches. As an elementary school teacher, I see the effects of the previous night's offerings on the playground in the morning. Martial arts movies invariably lead to kicking and play fighting before school even begins. The current fad of police ride-along shows has the children chasing each other around with "guns drawn." I don't think the mimicry stops at kids, either. Haven't you wondered why there are so many high-speed chases in the Los Angeles area?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Comic great Jonathan Winters was struggling to make a name for himself in the early 1950s when a man at the nightclub where he was performing offered some life-changing advice. Winters had a talent for channeling the voices of celebrities like Gary Cooper and Boris Karloff but, the man observed, "All you're doing is shining their shoes. You'd best think up your own characters. " That, Winters told TV Guide many years later, was "the best hunk of criticism I ever got. " With his rubbery, moon-shaped face and pitch-perfect ear for speech patterns, Winters began to unleash a cavalcade of charmingly twisted characters, including a redneck ballplayer, a lisping child and a prissy schoolmarm.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
John M. Wilson's article on the International Imitation Hemingway Competition ("To Almost Have and Have Not," March 16), came across as pure sour grapes, despite his quoting several of the final-round celebrity judges to support his point that the literature professors who serve as prescreening judges are a bunch of humorless curmudgeons When I interviewed several of the professors involved in culling competition entries a few years ago for an article,...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Robert Abele
"White Irish Drinkers" might be writer-director John Gray's profane, boisterous, blood-spattered love letter to growing up in '70s Brooklyn, but its truer and more regrettable connection is to the rampant Scorsese mimicry that characterized early-'90s indie calling cards. You know the kind: movies where young guys with glaringly obvious life choices ? here, it's whether kind-eyed, wisecracking, big-dreaming Brian (Nick Thurston), who paints secretly in the basement, should escape the influence of his boozy, violent father (Stephen Lang)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Robert Abele
"White Irish Drinkers" might be writer-director John Gray's profane, boisterous, blood-spattered love letter to growing up in '70s Brooklyn, but its truer and more regrettable connection is to the rampant Scorsese mimicry that characterized early-'90s indie calling cards. You know the kind: movies where young guys with glaringly obvious life choices ? here, it's whether kind-eyed, wisecracking, big-dreaming Brian (Nick Thurston), who paints secretly in the basement, should escape the influence of his boozy, violent father (Stephen Lang)
BOOKS
April 13, 1986 | David M. Graber, Graber is a research biologist with the National Park Service
One of the sad side-effects of this increasingly paved and polluted planet has been the decline of butterflies. Collectors, who could once swing their nets with great success in suburban gardens, now must content themselves with meager assemblages or mount expeditions to less sprayed and settled country. On the other hand, the hobby of lepidoptery and the modern synthesis of biological sciences have rediscovered one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2008 | Mary McNamara
The woman with a million faces is bringing them to Showtime. Starting tonight, the British comic who began her career as a pop vocalist is up to some of her old tricks in "Tracey Ullman's State of the Union." For a half-hour every week, she offers viewers a day in the life of America, playing a mind-boggling cast of characters including well-known celebrities and the homeless woman recently dumped on the street after her health insurance ran out.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | From a Times staff writer
A quip made on Thursday by Sen. Sam Brownback about Democratic fund-raiser John Huang touched off immediate criticism and prompted an apology from the Kansas Republican. "No raise money, no get bonus," cracked Brownback in describing a bonus pay scheme that the Democratic National Committee had arranged with Huang. A moment later, Brownback said that he meant "no slight by my statement previously," an apparent reference to his mimicking language and failed attempt at humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Steve Hochman
The Appalachian sounds, subject matter nd syntax still seem a bit suspect coming from a Los Angeles-raised singer-songwriter--especially with the wealth of "authentic" material available now. Sure, some top-flight artists have done amazing things appropriating from other cultures--e.g., Mick Jagger singing American blues. Much of this music by Welch and her partner David Rawlings, though, is mere stylistic mimicry.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1985 | ROBERT HANLEY, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge Tuesday denied a request by Digital Equipment Corp. to force C. Itoh Electronics Inc. and its Irvine-based subsidiary, CIE Terminals, to stop making equipment that allegedly looks too much like products made by Digital. The suit, filed last December in federal court in New Jersey contended that CIE's CIT-220-plus terminal mimicked the screen formats, keyboard layout and shape of Digital's VT220 video-display terminal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2008 | Mary McNamara
The woman with a million faces is bringing them to Showtime. Starting tonight, the British comic who began her career as a pop vocalist is up to some of her old tricks in "Tracey Ullman's State of the Union." For a half-hour every week, she offers viewers a day in the life of America, playing a mind-boggling cast of characters including well-known celebrities and the homeless woman recently dumped on the street after her health insurance ran out.
AUTOS
August 10, 2005 | Dan Neil
IMITATION is the sincerest form of thievery, and no car is more sincere than the new Hyundai Sonata. The first car issued from the loins of a new billion-dollar factory in Montgomery, Ala. -- chances are you've seen the ads trumpeting Hyundai's investment in the right-to-work homeland -- the Sonata is to the Honda Accord what the tribute band Zoso is to Led Zeppelin, a startlingly faithful rendition of the original at state fair prices. But ultimately not very original.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2005 | From Reuters
Elephants have an unusual ability to mimic and learn new sounds, which scientists believe they use as a form of acoustic communication. Birds, bats, primates and marine mammals do it, but this is the first time the trait has been found in elephants, said Joyce Poole of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project in Nairobi, Kenya. "Elephants appear to be capable of imitating other sounds, including those that are not part of their repertoire," Poole said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Simon says: Walk my walk. Simon says: Talk my talk. Simon says: Imitate. Such copycat games of follow the leader, dependent on matching the actions of others, are the stuff of childhood afternoons and nursery school play. Now, research also reveals that they are incorporated into the bedrock of the brain itself as an important natural tool for development and learning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Steve Hochman
The Appalachian sounds, subject matter nd syntax still seem a bit suspect coming from a Los Angeles-raised singer-songwriter--especially with the wealth of "authentic" material available now. Sure, some top-flight artists have done amazing things appropriating from other cultures--e.g., Mick Jagger singing American blues. Much of this music by Welch and her partner David Rawlings, though, is mere stylistic mimicry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decades ago, artists generally spent years in relative obscurity, showing their work only to a few friends. In a speedier world, artists crave the spotlight. Further down the food chain, dealers, collectors and critics find themselves frantically chasing what they hope will be tomorrow's wonders. That's simply the way it is in a post-Warholian world. Nevertheless, it can feel faintly ridiculous to be standing in a gallery and taking notes on works by artists who may not be ready for prime time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phil Hartman, the "Saturday Night Live" veteran who has received raves for his dead-eye impersonation of Bill Clinton, drafted a long letter this week to the President-elect. "I don't want him to be offended," Hartman said from NBC's studios in New York, explaining that he had voted for Clinton. "Whatever I say or do, I want him to know that I'm on his side, and I'm a fan. I'm a satirist, and satire on the surface can seem cutting and mean, but it's my job to impersonate him on network TV."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decades ago, artists generally spent years in relative obscurity, showing their work only to a few friends. In a speedier world, artists crave the spotlight. Further down the food chain, dealers, collectors and critics find themselves frantically chasing what they hope will be tomorrow's wonders. That's simply the way it is in a post-Warholian world. Nevertheless, it can feel faintly ridiculous to be standing in a gallery and taking notes on works by artists who may not be ready for prime time.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | From a Times staff writer
A quip made on Thursday by Sen. Sam Brownback about Democratic fund-raiser John Huang touched off immediate criticism and prompted an apology from the Kansas Republican. "No raise money, no get bonus," cracked Brownback in describing a bonus pay scheme that the Democratic National Committee had arranged with Huang. A moment later, Brownback said that he meant "no slight by my statement previously," an apparent reference to his mimicking language and failed attempt at humor.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
In the past, saxophonist Brandon Fields used to get a lot of mileage out of the fact that he could pretty much imitate the saxophone sound of the popular musician David Sanborn in the recording studios. These days, the 33-year-old North Hollywood resident, who says he never has been strictly a Sanborn clone, feels that it's a lot more important to be known for his own playing, so he's avoiding situations that lead to comparisons to a player such as Sanborn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|