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Mind Body

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elderly women tap a staccato cadence in a dance studio. Older men pump iron in a fitness room next door. Preschoolers romp on a grassy playground. For more than a decade, the Bernard Milken Jewish Community Campus on Vanowen Street has provided recreational, social and cultural programs for young children and elderly West Valley residents. But the Jewish Federation / Valley Alliance and West Valley Jewish Community Center, which together run the campus at 22622 Vanowen St.
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NEWS
January 23, 1998 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when doctors said Ray Mills would never speak his own name, when Tammy Brackens' counselors saw no job future for the child who liked to draw. And a time when Milton Davis could not imagine that his constant doodles would wind up framed, on other people's walls. That time has passed. Ask any of these developmentally disabled adults what they do, or who they are, and they will answer: "Artist."
HEALTH
December 22, 1997 | SHARI ROAN
Elizabeth Miles, Book: Berkley $12, 291 pages CD: Deutsche Grammophon $11.99, 71 minutes Cassette: Deutsche Grammophon $7.99, 71 minutes * In 1993, researchers at UC Irvine showed that people listening to a Mozart piano sonata improved their IQ by an average of nine points. This nice collection of resources by Los Angeles radio personality (KKGO-FM / 105.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1997 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Huntington Beach is cut from a different cloth. Along Beach Boulevard, you can investigate the Shroud of Turin, possibly the most studied object in history, then check in at Strouds The Linen Experts. Contemplate the rich fabric of life over Italian fare at Baci. AFTERNOON 1 The history--or legend, depending on whom you ask--of the Shroud of Turin begins when St. Jude purportedly carried the burial cloth of Jesus Christ from the tomb to the ailing king of Turkey.
NEWS
August 18, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Even though thousands of Americans have been found to have chronic fatigue syndrome since the disorder was officially recognized in 1988, experts still cannot agree on what CFS is or how it's caused. The disparity of opinion was on prominent display here Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Assn. during a debate on the question: Is CFS a mind or body illness?
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A frozen waterfall is a slick seductress, fragile and breathtaking. To climb the face of one--to shinny up all 600 feet of Colorado's Ames Ice Hose, for example--is to skate on the razor edge of disaster. The ice is fickle, sometimes weakened by sunlight, or corroded by trapped air. Or frozen so brittle it shatters in face-stinging shards under the force of an ice ax.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | ROSALYNN CARTER, Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter is chairman of the Mental Health Task Force at the Carter Center in Atlanta
The Health Insurance Reform Act, passed by unanimous vote in the Senate last week, gives equal weight to mental and physical illnesses in our health care system. Unfortunately, this portion of the bill is hotly contested. This is not the first chance Congress has had to end the historic discrimination against people with mental illness.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The anesthesia had worn off and once again 9-year-old Ryan Wilson could feel the pain. "It hurts! It hurts!" His doctor happened to be walking by. Earlier that morning, Dr. Allen Richard Grossman and three other surgeons had huddled over Ryan in the operating room at Sherman Oaks Hospital, taking scalpels to the discolored flesh of his left arm and leg, searching for hope that the limbs could be saved.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battling a recent illness, Vicki Bennett endured the usual unpleasantness of a trip to the hospital: bouts of pain so bad she couldn't sleep, a battery of awful tests and the fear of knowing she was sick enough to be there. But Mid-Columbia Medical Center is no ordinary hospital. The only hospital in this Columbia River Gorge town may be a window into the future of medical care.
TRAVEL
December 24, 1995 | HANK KOVELL
The College of the Tehachipis, which is an affiliate of the Elderhostel learning programs for mature travelers, has a choice of programs in Southern California in 1996 that include golf and tennis clinics, a hiking tour, a backpacking tour and a grandparent-grandkids camp. There are also two foreign tours, one in Costa Rica and the other in Australia and New Zealand. Several programs offer a choice of two dates. All prices quoted are per person, double occupancy. * Tennis Everyone?
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