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OPINION
August 26, 2010
The saga of 33 Chilean miners trapped in a sweltering chamber 2,000 feet below the Earth's surface has gripped the world. For nearly three weeks before rescuers made contact, these disciplined men tunneled for water and survived on two spoonfuls of tuna, sips of milk and a cracker every two days. Their rations have nourished faith and inspired hope for humanity. But their dusty imprisonment in the San Jose gold and copper mine since Aug. 5 also has provoked horror and rage at an industry that time and again fails to protect its workers.
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TRAVEL
March 21, 2014 | By David Kelly
GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo.  - Since moving to Colorado from Southern California three years ago, I've come to hate winter. Scalding baths, wool blankets, the dog snoozing on my feet - nothing takes the edge off the bitter cold. It lingers in the air, in the bones and, most of all, in the soul. Then a friend told me about a place three hours from Denver guaranteed to rocket my moribund core temperature through the roof. I set off on a dark January morning in a raging blizzard.
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WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By David Zucchino and Kim Geiger
Four rescue crews made their way into the Upper Big Branch mine just before 5 a.m. Eastern time Thursday in an attempt to reach four miners unaccounted for since the devastating explosion that killed 25 coworkers Monday, Gov. Joe Manchin III told reporters. "We are in full recovery mode," Manchin said at an early morning news conference. "They are advancing. They will move as rapidly as they possibly can." Once rescue crews are deep inside the mine, they will decide whether to also try to recover the bodies of 18 miners near the two locations where officials hope the four missing miners will be found.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - Now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the yearlong process that could lead to halting construction on the controversial Pebble Mine, stakeholders in Alaska's bountiful Bristol Bay are weighing in. There is celebration over what could be possible protection for the world's most productive sockeye salmon fishery. There is wariness about a process that could impede progress on the largest open pit mine in North America. And there is also a lot of anger up in the Last Frontier, where many of the region's deeply independent residents bristle at what they view as the federal government's meddling in their affairs.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Two miners were killed and 20 others injured in a mining accident in Ouray County, Colo., state emergency officials said Sunday. Officials first received a call about the incident at Star Mine Operations at 7:20 a.m. Sunday, at which point 20 miners were taken to local hospitals with injuries. Two miners remained below ground and were discovered dead, according to the Colorado Office of Emergency Management. Rory Williams, project manager for Star Mining Operations, told the Ouray Watch that the accident was not a cave-in or a collapse but rather a "powder-smoke incident" that involved the release of chemicals.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and David Zucchino
The remains of all four miners missing from the devastating explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine were found by rescue crews late Friday night, ending a desperate, four-day search for men who authorities now say were killed by the blast Monday afternoon. "We did not receive the miracle we prayed for," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III said at a news conference at 12:30 a.m. Eastern time. The discovery of the four bodies brings the total death toll from the explosion Monday at the mine to 29, making it the worst mining disaster in nearly 40 years.
OPINION
May 12, 2011
What's in a name Re "Dishonored," Opinion, May 10 Karl Jacoby's general issue with how Americans do not fully grasp our Native American past is true in many respects, but I did not take the military code-name "Geronimo" as denigrating to the Apache leader. Quite the contrary. Whether we were playing games as kids or riding a roller- coaster, to yell out "Geronimo" was something of a war cry, a battle yell — shouting the name of that brave warrior to provide adrenaline and courage.
WORLD
April 6, 2010 | By Barbara Demick
For once, it was good news that came out from the depths of a Chinese coal mine as 115 workers were rescued Monday after eight days and eight nights trapped underground in Shanxi province. The extraordinary rescue turned into a round-the-clock reality show with state-run CCTV broadcasting live footage of the rescue workers carrying out the miners to a cheering audience. Crews were still hoping Monday night to bring out 38 more. Although the miners had their faces wrapped with towels to protect their eyes after so many days in darkness, their elation was evident.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been updated.
WASHINGTON -- Employees of a major coal industry donor to Republican causes have raised complaints about their participation in an event earlier this month organized for GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in the crucial swing state of Ohio. Several miners at Murray Energy's Century coal mine in Beallsville, Ohio, contacted a nearby morning talk radio host, David Blomquist, over the last two weeks to say that they were forced to attend an Aug. 14 rally for Romney at the mine. Murray closed the mine the day of the rally, saying it was necessary for security and safety, then docked miners the day's pay. Asked by WWVA radio's Blomquist about the allegations on Monday's show, Murray chief operating officer Robert Moore said: “Attendance was mandatory but no one was forced to attend the event.” The Century mine is owned by Robert Murray, an enthusiastic Romney supporter and major contributor to the Republican Party on his own and through Murray Energy, one of the largest private coal companies in the U.S. Murray and his wife have given Republican candidates a total of $471,185 since the 2008 election, including the maximum of $5,000 each to Romney this year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.
WORLD
April 5, 2010 | By Barbara Demick
For once, it was good news that came from the depths of a Chinese coal mine as 115 workers were rescued Monday after eight days and eight nights trapped deep inside a mine in Shanxi province. The extraordinary rescue turned into a round-the-clock reality show with state-run TV broadcasting live footage of the rescue workers carrying out the miners to a cheering audience. Rescue crews were still hoping as of Monday night to bring out 38 more miners. Although the miners had their faces wrapped with towels to protect their eyes after so many days in darkness, their elation was evident.
FOOD
February 19, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
From the legendary Quintarelli estate in Valpolicella, here's a lovely and surprising white wine scented with white peaches and lime. With its minerality and bright acidity, this could be the Veneto's analogue to Grüner Veltliner. Perfect for impressing a wine geek. It's terrific with oysters and chilled shrimp, and a great choice with a frittata or omelet. It works with asparagus too. And, of course, it would be ideal with sushi and Thai food. Region: Valpolicella, Veneto, Italy Price: $38 to $40 Style: Crisp and minerally What it goes with: Chilled shellfish, omelet and frittata, sushi, Thai food Where to find it: John and Pete's Fine Wines & Spirits in West Hollywood, (310)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Derived from found footage, Bill Morrison's films are odes to snubbed celluloid. Whether he slices the surviving moldy fragments of a lost silent film, as in "Decasia," or crafts a dirge to the 1927 flooding of the Mississippi River with old documentary material, as in the recent "The Great Flood," Morrison savors decayed film stock for its ghostly beauty. Lost worlds are not created or evoked; they are discovered and recovered. What makes Morrison a great filmmaker, though, is not merely his application of restoration hardware but his brilliant exercise of symphonic software.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Apple released its annual supplier responsibility report Thursday, drawing praise from Greenpeace for steps the company has taken to reduce use of conflict minerals in its products.  "Apple's increased transparency about its suppliers is becoming a hallmark of Tim Cook's leadership at the company," said Greenpeace Energy Campaigner Tom Dowdall in a statement. "Apple has flexed its muscles in the past to push suppliers to remove hazardous substances from products and provide more renewable energy for data centers, and it is proving the same model can work to reduce the use of conflict minerals.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Two miners were killed and 20 others injured in a mining accident in Ouray County, Colo., state emergency officials said Sunday. Officials first received a call about the incident at Star Mine Operations at 7:20 a.m. Sunday, at which point 20 miners were taken to local hospitals with injuries. Two miners remained below ground and were discovered dead, according to the Colorado Office of Emergency Management. Rory Williams, project manager for Star Mining Operations, told the Ouray Watch that the accident was not a cave-in or a collapse but rather a "powder-smoke incident" that involved the release of chemicals.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Pablo Jaramillo Viteri and Chris Kraul
QUITO, Ecuador - The vice president of Ecuador on Friday denounced illegal mining as growing scourge a day after a violent confrontation between soldiers and miners in an Amazonian region left one civilian dead and nine soldiers wounded. The violence occurred after soldiers attempted to confiscate river dredges and dislodge mostly indigenous miners in the province of Morona Santiago, about 200 miles southeast of Quito, the capital. Foreign mining concerns and small-scale miners, often without permits, have ramped up gold-mining projects in the region in recent years.
OPINION
October 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's not exactly Big Data. Not yet, anyway. Los Angeles City Hall has so far given us two Big Burps of public information, one in the form of a website from the mayor's office that measures the performance of city departments, and one from the controller making it easier to find out how much city workers and contractors get paid. The numbers, by themselves, don't necessarily mean much. But that's OK. Local government has been generally behind the curve in sharing with the public the massive amounts of information it has on the money it collects and spends and on the services it provides; Los Angeles is about in the middle of the pack in catching up to the private sector in compiling and making use of operational and customer data.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Six miners fell 100 feet to their deaths when a steel structure they were standing on collapsed, the mine's management said Thursday. Gold Fields South Africa said the accident occurred late Wednesday.
NEWS
August 23, 1988
At least 10 miners have died and 20 others were injured in a series of cave-ins in the southern Philippines, where thousands of people have flocked in search of gold, officials said Monday.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
LOGAN, W.Va. - When President Obama laid out ambitious plans in June for combating climate change, coal miners like Roger Horton heard what they considered the latest fusillade in the administration's "war on coal. " Until his retirement two weeks ago, Horton, 59, worked underground for decades in southern West Virginia's Logan County, then operated a 200-ton earth-moving truck to remove debris from blasted mountaintops. A milestone in Obama's initiative will come this week, when the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to issue rules limiting emissions from new power plants.
WORLD
March 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
TAGHAR, Afghanistan - In a rugged valley outside Kabul, where mud-walled villages blend into bare scrubland, a team of international mining experts and Afghan trainees set up camp over the winter to probe the region's mineral resources. Protected by armed guards, they spent three months drilling test holes into the snowcapped peaks, as curious goat- and sheepherders looked on. "We hit copper damn near everywhere," said Robert Miller, a Colorado-based mining executive recruited by the Pentagon to help advise Afghan authorities on how to develop the country's natural resources.
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