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NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The world's largest private coal company was fined $500,000 by the federal government for tampering with coal dust samples taken to protect miners' health. Peabody Coal Co. pleaded guilty to federal charges of violating a required testing program that is designed to keep dust concentrations low and thus prevent such respiratory diseases as pneumoconiosis, or black lung. Peabody was fined last week in Charleston, W. Va.
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NATIONAL
April 14, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and David Zucchino
Nearly 50 mines nationwide were targeted for enforcement action by federal mine safety inspectors for repeated violations last summer but remained open because of unresolved appeals by mine operators, U.S. Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez) said Wednesday. Among the 32 coal mines targeted was the Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia, where 29 miners died in a massive underground explosion April 5. High methane levels are suspected at the mine, which has long history of safety violations.
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NATIONAL
April 14, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and David Zucchino
Nearly 50 mines nationwide were targeted for enforcement action by federal mine safety inspectors for repeated violations last summer but remained open because of unresolved appeals by mine operators, U.S. Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez) said Wednesday. Among the 32 coal mines targeted was the Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia, where 29 miners died in a massive underground explosion April 5. High methane levels are suspected at the mine, which has long history of safety violations.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Labor Department said it has found widespread fraud in the coal industry by mine operators who repeatedly tampered with the coal dust samples used to gauge miners' risk of black lung disease. A 20-month investigation uncovered about 4,700 alleged instances of tampering at about 850 underground coal mines, Labor Secretary Lynn Martin said. The department proposes that a record $5 million in fines be levied against 500 companies for alleged tampering at mines in 16 states.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The uranium mine is shut now. Has been for years. Air compressors, tools, coils and pulleys are rusting on the ground. Yet the men who once worked the mine continue to die. Lynn Frederick toiled in this mine and was happy to get the work until it closed in 1966. Each morning he would leave before sunrise and work deep underground, operating the heavy water drill and carving out chunks of rock from inside the mountain. Now, Lynn Frederick is missing a lung.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Labor Department said it has found widespread fraud in the coal industry by mine operators who repeatedly tampered with the coal dust samples used to gauge miners' risk of black lung disease. A 20-month investigation uncovered about 4,700 alleged instances of tampering at about 850 underground coal mines, Labor Secretary Lynn Martin said. The department proposes that a record $5 million in fines be levied against 500 companies for alleged tampering at mines in 16 states.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Appalachian coal miners voted nearly 2 to 1 to ratify their contract with Pittston Coal Group, union officials announced today. The vote ends a bitter 10-month strike that served as a rallying point for the American labor movement. Pittston employees in Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky voted 1,247 to 734 in favor of the pact. Sixty-three percent of the striking miners and laid-off workers endorsed the contract and 37% opposed it, according to figures provided by the United Mine Workers.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Appalachian coal miners voted Monday on a contract with Pittston Coal Group that could end an acrimonious 10-month strike that drew international support from labor organizations. United Mine Workers Vice President Cecil Roberts planned to announce the result of the vote this morning at the union's southwest Virginia district office, UMW spokesman Gene Carroll said. A simultaneous announcement was planned at the AFL-CIO convention in Miami. James Hicks, president of Local 1259 in Cleveland, Va.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A state mining inspector's shouts during the Sago Mine disaster might have been what led the relatives of 12 missing miners to believe they had all been found alive, he told a public hearing Wednesday. "I don't recall the exact words I used," said Bill Tucker, an assistant inspector at large for the state Office of Miners' Health Safety and Training. "I was just screaming out for help. I think I may have said 'They're alive.'
NATIONAL
May 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"Did our dad have to die?" Peggy Cohen wanted to know Tuesday as mine safety regulators opened an emotional public hearing on questions surrounding the January disaster that left 12 men dying deep inside the Sago Mine. Relatives of the other miners followed her to the microphone, some clutching framed photos of the victims. "We assure you, Mr. Politicians, that we're not going to let this rest," said John Groves, whose brother Jerry Groves was among the victims.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The world's largest private coal company was fined $500,000 by the federal government for tampering with coal dust samples taken to protect miners' health. Peabody Coal Co. pleaded guilty to federal charges of violating a required testing program that is designed to keep dust concentrations low and thus prevent such respiratory diseases as pneumoconiosis, or black lung. Peabody was fined last week in Charleston, W. Va.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The uranium mine is shut now. Has been for years. Air compressors, tools, coils and pulleys are rusting on the ground. Yet the men who once worked the mine continue to die. Lynn Frederick toiled in this mine and was happy to get the work until it closed in 1966. Each morning he would leave before sunrise and work deep underground, operating the heavy water drill and carving out chunks of rock from inside the mountain. Now, Lynn Frederick is missing a lung.
WORLD
October 12, 2010 | Chris Kraul, Kraul is a special correspondent.
In a test run Monday, engineers succeeded in lowering a rescue capsule almost all the way down the 2,000-foot hole through which crews plan to lift 33 trapped miners, perhaps starting late Tuesday or early Wednesday, government officials said. Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne told reporters that the team preparing to retrieve the miners trapped since Aug. 5 had finished the job of partially lining the uppermost part of the shaft with metal tubing to guard against cave-ins.
WORLD
October 14, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Chile freed the last of 33 miners from imprisonment nearly half a mile underground late Wednesday, the miracle of a second chance at life made real by the methodical shuttle of a battered red, white and blue rescue capsule willed on by a joyful nation and global audience of hundreds of millions. When 54-year-old foreman Luis Urzua emerged at 9:55 p.m. from the 28-inch-diameter hole that curved deep into the San Jose mine, it had been 69 days since the miners were trapped, 52 days since they were able to declare to the world that they were still alive ?
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