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Mines Explosives

NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Reuters
Kuwait resumed oil exports Saturday with a 260,000-ton shipment--the first since Iraq invaded the emirate almost a year ago. Oil Minister Hamoud Rogba told the newspaper Al-Watan that most of the oil had been produced in June and July. The oil was loaded aboard the tanker Thorness, which was due to leave the Ahmadi terminal Saturday morning.
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NEWS
February 22, 1991
The amphibious assault helicopter carrier Tripoli was damaged by mines this week while on a minesweeping operation. The San Diego-based vessel is the flagship of the U.S.-led mine countermeasures group in the Gulf. Can accommodate 20 Sea Knight or 11 Sea Stallion helicopters and up to 4 Harrier jets. Class: Iwo Jima Crew: 686 Length: 600 feet Commissioned: Aug. 6, 1966 Displacement: 18,000 tons, full load.
WORLD
April 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight people were killed when land mines detonated near two military vehicles in separate attacks in northeastern Sri Lanka, officials said. Three were killed when one mine exploded near a jeep carrying air force personnel returning to camp, said Capt. Ajantha Perera, an air force spokesman. He blamed Tamil Tiger rebels. Earlier, a similar mine had exploded as a bus carrying troops approached the town of Vavuniya, said Gamini Silva, deputy inspector general of police.
WORLD
November 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Bangladeshi army explosives experts began destroying land mines to comply with an international treaty banning the weapons, which kill or maim thousands of civilians worldwide every year. In controlled explosions at a military demolition range near the capital, Dhaka, the specialists blasted 750 mines as army officials, diplomats, journalists and a few villagers watched.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
American peacekeeping troops launched a surprise raid Friday near the town of Kacanik in southeastern Kosovo, seizing a variety of illegally held land mines, U.S. military officials said. Details of the operation were sketchy, but a brief statement from Camp Bondsteel, headquarters for the U.S. peacekeeping force in Kosovo--a province of Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic--said the raid was launched in the early morning hours by air assault troops of the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry.
WORLD
May 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
A land mine exploded Thursday underneath a vehicle carrying two German peacekeepers, killing one and wounding the other. The explosion was a "tragic accident" and there is no evidence that it was a deliberate attack on the soldiers, German Defense Minister Peter Struck said in Berlin. They were on patrol in a two-vehicle convoy about 10 miles south of Kabul, the capital, when the mine exploded, said Lt. Col. Paul Kolken, a spokesman for the International Security Assistance Force.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
One of the top U.N. officials in Kosovo criticized NATO on Friday for its failure to reveal the location of cluster bombs that have killed or maimed hundreds during the last year. Dennis McNamara, the United Nations head of humanitarian assistance in Kosovo, said weapons-clearance experts are increasingly frustrated because they have insufficient information about the location of last year's NATO strikes to enable them to remove unexploded bombs.
WORLD
November 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A truck carrying soldiers drove over a land mine in western Colombia, killing six people in an attack an official blamed on the nation's largest guerrilla group. The blast, 93 miles southwest of Bogota, in Tolima province, killed five soldiers and a sub-official, said an official with the army's 5th division who requested anonymity before a scheduled announcement of the attack by a superior. The attack was blamed on the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mariano Jose Castillo spent most of the 1980s as a soldier planting land mines around Nicaragua's borders, bridges and power lines while officers like Manuel Segura carefully mapped their locations. The men were protecting their then-socialist country from U.S.-backed rebels who sneaked in from base camps in Honduras and Costa Rica. At the same time, the soldiers kept careful records of where the mines were planted, anticipating a future when the weapons would no longer be needed.
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