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Mining Poland

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BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poland Plans Mine Closings: The leftist coalition government approved a plan to lose 80,000 jobs and shut down nine coal mines by 2000 to stem losses in Poland's formerly pampered mining sector. A report published after the government's weekly meeting said the financial health of the country's 64 mines had "deteriorated abruptly" in 1995. Unable to adjust to the market economy, production is exceeding domestic needs and employment is running too high.
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NEWS
February 7, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Second-generation miner Jerzy Gacek and his family lived the traditional Silesian coal-mining life for many years. He went below ground every day; his wife stayed home with the children; work was hard, but the pay was good. Now, as Poland struggles to become more competitive in a global economy, Gacek, 48, hopes that the restructuring of the nation's coal industry won't catch up with him before he gets a miner's pension.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Two miners were killed and a third was injured in two separate accidents on Thursday in the Walbrzych mining area of southwest Poland, the official PAP news agency said.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poland Plans Mine Closings: The leftist coalition government approved a plan to lose 80,000 jobs and shut down nine coal mines by 2000 to stem losses in Poland's formerly pampered mining sector. A report published after the government's weekly meeting said the financial health of the country's 64 mines had "deteriorated abruptly" in 1995. Unable to adjust to the market economy, production is exceeding domestic needs and employment is running too high.
NEWS
February 8, 1989
About 5,000 Polish coal miners pressed ahead with a strike, apparently defying appeals by two emissaries sent by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa. The miners said they stopped work shortly after midnight at the Belchatow mine, 90 miles southwest of Warsaw, after talks with management broke down. The strikers have demanded more pay but said they did not want to disrupt round-table talks in which the government is seeking a deal with the banned Solidarity union to help solve Poland's economic
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Second-generation miner Jerzy Gacek and his family lived the traditional Silesian coal-mining life for many years. He went below ground every day; his wife stayed home with the children; work was hard, but the pay was good. Now, as Poland struggles to become more competitive in a global economy, Gacek, 48, hopes that the restructuring of the nation's coal industry won't catch up with him before he gets a miner's pension.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
A yellow smog hangs over the sooty snow of Poland's industrial heartland, carrying noxious dust and gases to the gaily painted apartment blocks that rise among the coal mines, steel plants and power stations. "If you wash your windows on Monday, on Tuesday they're dirty already, and on Wednesday you can't even see through them," a woman told a visitor. The dirt this woman can wash away may be the least of her problems.
NEWS
February 8, 1989
About 5,000 Polish coal miners pressed ahead with a strike, apparently defying appeals by two emissaries sent by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa. The miners said they stopped work shortly after midnight at the Belchatow mine, 90 miles southwest of Warsaw, after talks with management broke down. The strikers have demanded more pay but said they did not want to disrupt round-table talks in which the government is seeking a deal with the banned Solidarity union to help solve Poland's economic
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Two miners were killed and a third was injured in two separate accidents on Thursday in the Walbrzych mining area of southwest Poland, the official PAP news agency said.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
A yellow smog hangs over the sooty snow of Poland's industrial heartland, carrying noxious dust and gases to the gaily painted apartment blocks that rise among the coal mines, steel plants and power stations. "If you wash your windows on Monday, on Tuesday they're dirty already, and on Wednesday you can't even see through them," a woman told a visitor. The dirt this woman can wash away may be the least of her problems.
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