Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMining Russia
IN THE NEWS

Mining Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin took over most of the Soviet Union's gold and diamond mining on Friday to help finance a program of radical economic reforms, then suspended oil exports to ensure enough fuel for the winter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 26, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Thirty-three cold and exhausted miners who spent nearly two days trapped underground in a southern Russian coal mine were brought to the surface and sent to a hospital Saturday, but hopes faded for an additional 13 that rescuers could not locate. Rescue teams using inflatable boats explored partially flooded mine shafts late into the evening Saturday in search of the missing group.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 27, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than half a mile underground, Vladimir M. Pogoreyuv slogged through water up to his calves, careful not to touch the naked 600-volt wire running just inches above his head along the roof of the Maiskaya mine. "I'm wearing rubber boots, so even though we're standing in water it probably wouldn't kill me if I were to accidentally touch it," said the 47-year-old miner in Russia's DonBass coal region, about 450 miles south of Moscow.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If anybody in Russia is mad enough to take to the streets, it should be the quarter of a million people trying to scrape by in this Siberian coal-mining town, where salaries haven't been paid for months and the government in far-off Moscow hasn't lived up to its promises for years. "By the time things get better here, I'll be long dead," predicted Valentina Filimonova, a worker in a local mine who longs for the old days when she could vacation on Lake Baikal.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry coal miners blocked trains on the Trans-Siberian Railway and barricaded the offices of two high-ranking officials Friday, prompting lawmakers to vote for an emergency bill that would cut their own office budgets and send the money to Russia's troubled mining regions. The sudden show of generosity by the Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, followed days of protests by miners across the country over wages that have not been paid for up to a year--an estimated $600 million total.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diamond Mining OK'd in New Russian Field: Local authorities in Russia's far northern region of Arkhangelsk have given their seal of approval to plans to develop a vast new diamond field north of the Arctic Circle, Itar-Tass news agency reported. Geologists say the Lomonosov diamond field, discovered seven years ago, could produce one-tenth of the world's rough diamond output when it is fully operational.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Siberian city of diamonds, where billions of dollars' worth of gems are mined, one passerby after another on the central square turned sadly away from Lydia Vorobova's inviting packets of cookies and candies. The goodies cost only 88 rubles a packet, 40 cents at current rates. But "that's expensive for us," Vorobova shrugged.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after they last got paid, the miners of the Russian Far East are beginning to starve. By Friday, all 10,000 of them had stopped work--not, they say, out of ill will but simply because they are just too weak to handle the tough conditions underground. No coal is being extracted. The region's power plant workers, themselves unpaid for months, also are refusing to operate the stations that supply electricity to the factories, homes and port of the local capital, Vladivostok.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 600,000 Russian coal miners went on strike, and union officials said the one-day stoppage would cost the nation 1 million tons of lost production. An official of the miners' union said 80% of the membership heeded the call to strike and that 210 mines were affected. The strikers, many of whom have not been paid since October, want the government to hand over $650 million in back wages and to draw up a program to help restructure the coal industry.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry coal miners blocked trains on the Trans-Siberian Railway and barricaded the offices of two high-ranking officials Friday, prompting lawmakers to vote for an emergency bill that would cut their own office budgets and send the money to Russia's troubled mining regions. The sudden show of generosity by the Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, followed days of protests by miners across the country over wages that have not been paid for up to a year--an estimated $600 million total.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after they last got paid, the miners of the Russian Far East are beginning to starve. By Friday, all 10,000 of them had stopped work--not, they say, out of ill will but simply because they are just too weak to handle the tough conditions underground. No coal is being extracted. The region's power plant workers, themselves unpaid for months, also are refusing to operate the stations that supply electricity to the factories, homes and port of the local capital, Vladivostok.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than half a mile underground, Vladimir M. Pogoreyuv slogged through water up to his calves, careful not to touch the naked 600-volt wire running just inches above his head along the roof of the Maiskaya mine. "I'm wearing rubber boots, so even though we're standing in water it probably wouldn't kill me if I were to accidentally touch it," said the 47-year-old miner in Russia's DonBass coal region, about 450 miles south of Moscow.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 600,000 Russian coal miners went on strike, and union officials said the one-day stoppage would cost the nation 1 million tons of lost production. An official of the miners' union said 80% of the membership heeded the call to strike and that 210 mines were affected. The strikers, many of whom have not been paid since October, want the government to hand over $650 million in back wages and to draw up a program to help restructure the coal industry.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diamond Mining OK'd in New Russian Field: Local authorities in Russia's far northern region of Arkhangelsk have given their seal of approval to plans to develop a vast new diamond field north of the Arctic Circle, Itar-Tass news agency reported. Geologists say the Lomonosov diamond field, discovered seven years ago, could produce one-tenth of the world's rough diamond output when it is fully operational.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four decades ago, a tangle-bearded old prospector emerged from the piney Siberian woods around the frontier town of Aldan and offered a green youth of 17 the key to a fortune. "He said he knew where there was gold and had the equipment to pan it, but he was too physically weak to do it alone," recalled Vladimir Postoyalkin, now head of production at the sprawling Aldan Gold Mining Co.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If anybody in Russia is mad enough to take to the streets, it should be the quarter of a million people trying to scrape by in this Siberian coal-mining town, where salaries haven't been paid for months and the government in far-off Moscow hasn't lived up to its promises for years. "By the time things get better here, I'll be long dead," predicted Valentina Filimonova, a worker in a local mine who longs for the old days when she could vacation on Lake Baikal.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four decades ago, a tangle-bearded old prospector emerged from the piney Siberian woods around the frontier town of Aldan and offered a green youth of 17 the key to a fortune. "He said he knew where there was gold and had the equipment to pan it, but he was too physically weak to do it alone," recalled Vladimir Postoyalkin, now head of production at the sprawling Aldan Gold Mining Co.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Siberian city of diamonds, where billions of dollars' worth of gems are mined, one passerby after another on the central square turned sadly away from Lydia Vorobova's inviting packets of cookies and candies. The goodies cost only 88 rubles a packet, 40 cents at current rates. But "that's expensive for us," Vorobova shrugged.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|