Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMinneapolis Mn
IN THE NEWS

Minneapolis Mn

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
March 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
MINNESOTA Minneapolis and St. Paul bus drivers went on strike, forcing up to 75,000 riders to find other ways to get to work. City officials claimed credit for averting major problems by using nonunion drivers and alerting commuters ahead of time. "Things could not have worked out more smoothly than that," said Peter Bell, chairman of the Metropolitan Council, following a problem-free morning rush hour. Drivers hit the picket lines about 2 a.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A city panel recommended that Minneapolis officials fire Bonnie Bleskachek, the nation's first openly lesbian big-city fire chief, in the wake of firefighter lawsuits accusing her of harassment and discrimination. Bleskachek, 43, had earlier agreed to step down. But the city's executive council unanimously rejected a negotiated deal after a closed-door meeting. "She was pretty stunned, because it was a complete surprise," said Bleskachek's attorney, Jerry Burg.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Light-rail trains began carrying passengers in Minneapolis 50 years after streetcar service ended. The first of the sleek yellow-and-blue cars rolled out after a morning ceremony in the downtown Warehouse District. The trains run only from the Warehouse District to Fort Snelling. Full service, which will extend to Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and on to the Mall of America in suburban Bloomington, is scheduled to begin in December.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Jeffrey Jamar has been named as the special agent in charge of the FBI's Minneapolis division, FBI Director William S. Sessions has announced. Jamar, 44, most recently was chief of the white-collar crimes section of the FBI's criminal investigation division in Washington.
SPORTS
January 20, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have had 65 inches of snow here since October. And as recently as 24 hours ago in Minneapolis, it was 12 below zero. But as the Super Bowl XXVI tourists began arriving Sunday, a week before the kickoff, the sun was out for a while, and the temperature had risen to 25. "Isn't it a nice day?" Minneapolis host committeemen and women remarked, greeting all visitors. And nobody seriously disagreed. For, on Halloween eve, there was a 28-inch snowstorm here, and it could have happened again.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail Gorbachev may be engaged in superpower summitry with a Republican President, but the moment he arrives in Minnesota on Sunday he belongs to the Democrats. Gorbachev will get only a six-hour glimpse of the American heartland as he and his wife, Raisa, stop in Minneapolis and St. Paul to lunch with Gov. Rudy Perpich and meet with business leaders before flying on to San Francisco.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not everybody was going gaga over Gorby. True, the fires of Gorbymania are being stoked by entrepreneurs with souvenirs to sell and by a high-powered corps of business leaders and politicians eager to capitalize on the Gorbachev visit. But at least one Minneapolis resident was not impressed. Injecting a note of dissent, the owner of a trendy restaurant covered his windows with a five-foot-long banner that reads, "Gorby Meets Goofy. Visits Iron Range Toilet Paper Recycling Plant."
NATIONAL
March 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
MINNESOTA Minneapolis and St. Paul bus drivers went on strike, forcing up to 75,000 riders to find other ways to get to work. City officials claimed credit for averting major problems by using nonunion drivers and alerting commuters ahead of time. "Things could not have worked out more smoothly than that," said Peter Bell, chairman of the Metropolitan Council, following a problem-free morning rush hour. Drivers hit the picket lines about 2 a.m.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the uninitiated, the weathered saloon doors leading into the Dry Gulch cantina might as well be a doorway to biker hell. But they open into a world where private struggles for redemption exert an uncommon sway. Past a leviathan row of Harley-Davidson motorcycles, bikers with matted beards and arms the width of cordwood hunker over a bar piled high with street hog badges, decals and shirts. As cigarette smoke curls in the dimly lit room and Z. Z.
SPORTS
January 20, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have had 65 inches of snow here since October. And as recently as 24 hours ago in Minneapolis, it was 12 below zero. But as the Super Bowl XXVI tourists began arriving Sunday, a week before the kickoff, the sun was out for a while, and the temperature had risen to 25. "Isn't it a nice day?" Minneapolis host committeemen and women remarked, greeting all visitors. And nobody seriously disagreed. For, on Halloween eve, there was a 28-inch snowstorm here, and it could have happened again.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black man had a gun. No, he didn't have a gun. He was shot in the chest. He was shot in the back. He was trying to escape. He was going to shoot. All that is known for sure is that the black man is dead, shot--it is now clear, in the back--by a white policeman. It is a street-corner tableau played out with chilling frequency in city after city, often with the predictable results: controversy, protests, calls for investigations.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrapping up his meetings with President Bush at a joint press conference, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev heads west today for the first tour of the United States by a Soviet leader since Nikita S. Khrushchev tramped through Iowa cornfields 31 years ago. The Gorbachev tour, with stops scheduled in Minneapolis and San Francisco, has one underlying theme: trade.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black man had a gun. No, he didn't have a gun. He was shot in the chest. He was shot in the back. He was trying to escape. He was going to shoot. All that is known for sure is that the black man is dead, shot--it is now clear, in the back--by a white policeman. It is a street-corner tableau played out with chilling frequency in city after city, often with the predictable results: controversy, protests, calls for investigations.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not everybody was going gaga over Gorby. True, the fires of Gorbymania are being stoked by entrepreneurs with souvenirs to sell and by a high-powered corps of business leaders and politicians eager to capitalize on the Gorbachev visit. But at least one Minneapolis resident was not impressed. Injecting a note of dissent, the owner of a trendy restaurant covered his windows with a five-foot-long banner that reads, "Gorby Meets Goofy. Visits Iron Range Toilet Paper Recycling Plant."
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a cold, dreary Sunday, the leader of the Soviet Union flew to the Great Plains for the sort of warm, hearty welcome that he no longer gets at home. Greeted by the orchestral music of Shostakovich at the airport, the sound of ringing bells at the governor's mansion and chants of "Gorby! Gorby!" at nearly all points in between, Mikhail S. Gorbachev proved that while he may be a bust in St. Petersburg, he's still boffo in St. Paul.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|