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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - When you're raking in tens of billions of dollars in profits by helping credit-elite borrowers buy homes, couldn't you lighten up on fees a little for everyday folks who'd also like to buy? That's a question increasingly being posed to government-controlled home mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and their federal regulators. Though most buyers are unaware of the practice, Fannie and Freddie - by far the largest sources of mortgage money in the country - continue to charge punitive, recession-era fees that can add thousands of dollars to consumers' financing costs.
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NATIONAL
June 10, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Across the nation, the number of minorities continues to rise and the white population continues to decline, according to U.S. census estimates released Thursday. Minorities now make up about 35% of the population in the United States, an increase of 5% from 2000, reflecting demographic changes seen most powerfully in the Golden State. "More of the country is going to be like California," said William Frey, a demographer with the Brookings Institution. Minorities make up 57% of the population in California.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Congress recognized 40 years ago that it was counterproductive and just plain wrong to incarcerate juveniles for trivial misbehavior such as truancy, breaking curfew, smoking or drinking. These acts, known as status offenses, are illegal only because the person committing them is a minor. Federal law passed at that time prohibited states from locking away most status offenders, but in 1980 the law was amended to allow incarceration when a court order had been violated. In other words, if a truant teenager was ordered by a court to attend school, and then cut class, incarceration was allowed.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
The roller-coaster ride of the real estate market over the last 15 years has soared higher and plunged deeper for minorities nationwide than it has for whites, according to a study of homeownership released Tuesday. The declines in homeownership among African Americans and U.S.-born Latinos in recent years were especially sharp, according to the study by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Black and Latino infants exposed to air pollution are at heightened risk for developing asthma, according to a study led by researchers from UC San Francisco. The study is the largest of its kind looking at the connections between asthma and air pollution exposure in minority children, researchers said. The study included about 4,300 black and Latino children from Chicago, New York City, Houston, the San Francisco Bay Area and Puerto Rico. The authors said that they hoped the study would lead to stricter standards on air pollutants, including nitrogen dioxide.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | Gail MarksJarvis
Millions of Americans aren't saving enough for retirement, but African American and Latino investors, on average, are further behind than whites and are more likely to be a greater burden to their families because they save too little and invest too conservatively, new research has found. "It's extraordinarily disconcerting," said Mellody Hobson, president of Ariel Investments, which along with benefits firm Hewitt Associates conducted a study of 401(k) participants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999
If television's fall schedule is a white world (May 28), the reaction from minorities ought to be, "Whew." One need only scan the comedies on independent stations to see the low-brow stereotypes that all networks love. Unless our sole motive for getting up each day is booty worship, quality precedes equality as an issue. VAL BUTLER Irvine
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By Peter Galbraith
The Obama administration - with the backing of key Republicans in Congress - is poised to embark on a strategy that entails punitive airstrikes on Syrian government positions and stepped-up lethal aid to moderate elements of the Syrian opposition. So far, however, the Syrian opposition has been unable to win significant support from the country's ethnic and religious minorities. Without such support, the opposition is unlikely to prevail even with stepped-up U.S. assistance. Moreover, the inability of the Syrian rebels, who are almost all Sunni Muslim Arabs, to win over the country's Kurds, Alawites and Christians raises the question of whether their victory is even desirable.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
The senator from Kentucky had an important question for Republicans in Michigan. “How are you supposed to make child support payments if you've been in prison, and the best job you can get is $9 an hour?” Sen. Rand Paul asked, wearing a suit and tie at the opening of a new GOP office on Livernois Avenue in Detroit. Child support, prison and the war on drugs are not usual topics for the GOP senator, who had previously gained media attention for launching a filibuster against President Obama'a nominee to head the CIA  because Paul questioned the administration's use of drones.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke and Rong-Gong Lin II
A magnitude 5.1 earthquake was reported Friday evening one mile from La Habra, California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 9:09 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0.6 miles. 11:50 p.m. USGS scientist Lucy Jones' advice for Friday night: “Don't put your child to bed under a tall bookcase that could fall over him tonight. " Updated at 11:30 p.m. Fullerton police say the corner of Rosecrans and Gilbert avenues is closed because of a water main break.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
SURPRISE, Ariz. - For Mike Scioscia , one question was enough. The Angels had just traded his son, in a headline-grabbing deal. They sent Matt Scioscia to the Chicago Cubs for Trevor Gretzky , son of Wayne Gretzky, the greatest player in hockey history. Scioscia offered a brief reaction to the trade on Thursday, after the Angels' 3-2 victory over the Kansas City Royals. "It's part of baseball," Scioscia said. "It's a good opportunity for Matt. " Scioscia cut off a follow-up question, about whether General Manager Jerry Dipoto had discussed the trade with the manager or simply informed him after its completion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Jason Wells
No injuries were reported Friday morning after a small landslide was triggered at a residential construction site in Silver Lake. The cascade of dirt occurred on a barren, three-home hillside lot in the 1400 block of North Occidental Boulevard at about 8 a.m., according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. None of the multi-story homes was affected by the flow of dirt, which partially came down onto the street below. Six fire engines were sent to the scene. Aerial television news footage showed construction workers assessing damage to the hillside as a small Bobcat-type excavator worked to dig out the dirt.
WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - At least four people were reported dead after knife-wielding assailants stabbed and slashed passers-by Friday morning in Changsha, in China's south-central Hunan province. Witnesses described the assailants as Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking minority from northwestern China's Xinjiang region. Militants from that region were implicated in a knifing rampage March 1 that left 33 people dead at a train station in Kunming, China. 12:15 a.m. update: The death toll from Friday's knife attack in Changsha has reached six. Initial witness reports indicated that members of a Turkic minority from northwestern China could have been involved.
SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By Helene Elliott
NHL general managers, meeting Tuesday in Florida, agreed to formally recommend three minor changes to the league's competition committee for consideration at its next meeting, in June. Although the general managers couldn't reach agreement on changing the length or general format of regular-season overtime - or on expanding the use of video replay - they decided to recommend three tweaks to existing rules. First, they will recommend that the hash marks on the faceoff circle be separated by two more feet, or from three feet to five feet, to create more separation between players on the wings.
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Myanmar, the country formerly known as Burma, has made substantial progress in the last few years, moving from military rule toward democracy, releasing political prisoners and freeing from house arrest Nobel Prize-winning democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi. However, the government has relentlessly continued its appalling treatment of the Rohingya population that lives in Rakhine state in western Myanmar. A Muslim minority in an overwhelmingly Buddhist country, the Rohingya are effectively denied citizenship unless they can meet onerous requirements, such as tracing their lineage back decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1994
"Majority rules" is an abstract mathematical goal cherished by those who find truth in numbers, but it has nothing whatsoever to do with justice ("Is the Court Becoming the Politburo?" by Paul Craig Roberts, Column Right, July 12). A poor black candidate running against a wealthy white one has almost no chance of getting elected. Check the demographics of the U.S. Senate for confirmation of this fact. Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas, arguing against the use of the Voting Rights Act for setting racial and ethnic quotas, fail to understand that the philosophy of majority rule without a financially level playing field has often been used and continues to be used to keep minorities out of the power structure.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
OXON HILL, Md. - After steep losses in the 2012 election, there was broad agreement within the Republican Party that its biggest challenge was bridging the divide with key voter groups - minorities, women and young voters - who threw their support behind President Obama, giving him the crucial margin in battleground states. But a year after the GOP's so-called autopsy report, the speeches from the party's leading voices at the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, reflected a complex reality: Republicans are still searching for a unified message to reach those groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO--Assemblyman Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) was at the White House on Thursday for the unveiling of President Obama's new program to help young men of color. The initiative, called "My Brother's Keeper," brings together government agencies, philanthropic foundations and businesses to improve the lives of young black and Latino men, in an aim to stop the "school-to-prison pipeline. " Bradford chairs the Assembly Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color, which has examined disparities in health, economic opportunity and education for minorities.  "History shows how the justice system and the educational system has challenged both boys and men of color," Bradford said in an interview.  Bradford said he looked forward to sharing his input for the national initiative and that wants to see an action plan -- "not just talk" -- and federal resources devoted to improving opportunities for minority youth.
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